Soon to be mine?

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#21
A section of aluminum trim is missing on Sunfish #1. While not a difficult repair, obtaining that particular section could be problematic. :oops:
 

norcalsail

Active Member
#27
A section of aluminum trim is missing on Sunfish #1. While not a difficult repair, obtaining that particular section could be problematic. :oops:
There is a complete set of trim for the Sunfish on Ebay. It's local pick up only in Sloatsburg New York.
 
Thread starter #29
The ports mean that someone has been inside the hull to repair the hull or dry it out, not bad in fact it looks like someone has worked to keep her sailing. The stand up block is an upgrade as far as I know, and as Beldar mentions the daggerboard looks hand crafted but good to use.

As far as I know the hull weight did not drop from 139 to 129 until the 1988 move to the rolled edge boats. Even if she weighs 139 + a few pounds she will sail well.

$500 is a good price as long as the sail is in good shape, no rips or ugly repairs or dry rot, and the hull is not waterlogged.

Good luck!
I have lots if deck/hull trim for sale. Contact me at: aglos@colgate.edu if interested.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY
Good to know, thank you
 
#31
Meh, you're dealing with the C/L factor... and the usual misrepresentations of the truth. Well, there's always the first boat, or maybe something else will pop up on the web. Don't forget the bulletin boards of any nearby clubs & marinas, there might be something for sale there... :rolleyes:
 
#32
Yeah anytime you see missing trim that's an indication of damage. Any damage on a sunfish hull will easily cost in excess of the hull value so the only thing left of value is the parts.
 
#34
I wouldn't buy a sunfish with DIY fiberglass repairs done either. You never know what your getting. Lots of threads here to prove it. The old hulls are only worth what $200-300, the rest of the value is in the parts. Sure you can patch it up for cheap, but to fix it right you need more than a band-aid. You've got to grind it down, lay some glass on both sides, and gelcoat to match. That ain't cheap or simple, it's a royal pain, particularly when you are starting from scratch and don't have all the tools and supplies a glass guy has.
 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#35
Sure you can patch it up for cheap, but to fix it right you need more than a band-aid. You've got to grind it down, lay some glass on both sides, and gelcoat to match. That ain't cheap or simple, it's a royal pain.
Sorry to disagree again, but grinding it down and laying on glass (only needed on the outside of the hull in most cases) is simple and if you use polyester resin not expensive at all. I don’t know anyone who would want to spend the time or money to gelcoat an old hull. For finishing, Rustoleum sprays are perfectly suitable, and specific marine paints are an option. If you want to make an old hull look new, you are talking time and some $$, but to make an old hull decent and seaworthy often isn’t very hard or expensive. If the repairs are complex, the foam is soggy, etc., then I agree with you.
 
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#36
I agree with Beldar- I’ve repaired and sold more than a dozen Sunfish. Never have I used gelcoat. Everything I’ve learned was from the wealth of information on this site and the yahoo forum. I have very few tools- only power tools are a jigsaw, a dremel and an orbital sander. Even an overweight boat can be dried out, and the boat the OP posted already has the inspection ports, so just add a fan and some off-season time (though the major stress cracks mentioned are a red flag)
I’d pay a lot less for a heavy boat, but wouldn’t automatically rule it out.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#38
I agree with Beldar- I’ve repaired and sold more than a dozen Sunfish. Never have I used gelcoat. Everything I’ve learned was from the wealth of information on this site and the yahoo forum. I have very few tools- only power tools are a jigsaw, a dremel and an orbital sander. Even an overweight boat can be dried out, and the boat the OP posted already has the inspection ports, so just add a fan and some off-season time (though the major stress cracks mentioned are a red flag)
I’d pay a lot less for a heavy boat, but wouldn’t automatically rule it out.
A Sawz-All costs $19 at Harbor Freight. You'll need a blade for it, but when demolition of a Sunfish is unavoidable, :( it'll speed up the process.

For a fan, look up "muffin fan". You only need one, they're less than $10, efficient, stay in place, and run 24/7 at very low cost--using house current.
 
#39
A Sawz-All costs $19 at Harbor Freight. You'll need a blade for it, but when demolition of a Sunfish is unavoidable, :( it'll speed up the process.

For a fan, look up "muffin fan". You only need one, they're less than $10, efficient, stay in place, and run 24/7 at very low cost--using house current.
Well, OK, I’ve got both of those, and I forgot, I have a power drill, too... But I rarely use the Sawzall!
 
#40
All my trailers get black Rustoleim for touch ups. I once painted a Catalina 22 waterline with a rattle can....maybe 30 yrs ago. But having gelcote supplies, it's hard for me to use paint (unless it's Awlgrip or the cheaper Brightside), as the final finish is far superior in durability and you can't buff Rustoleim to a high shine like you can gelcote. My metal patio furniture gets Rustoleim too! :)
That said....those that prefer sailing over maintenance and typically drag their boats a lot, the can paint is an option, but at that point why even paint is my theory...Formula 27 is white, Marinetex is close to white and West System can easily be tinted pure white. That's good enough imo for a scratched boat bottom or the sailor that isn't entering beauty contests.
 
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