Self-Bailer Substitude

Trueke

New Member
Thread starter #1
Looking around for a cheap bailer (yes I'm kind of cheap), and someone offered me a kayak bailer (didn't know kayaks used bailers) from an Aqua-Terra kayak that supposedly will work fine on my SF. Does anyone knows anything about using a different bailer on a SF whether it is this aqua-terra one or any other bailer method? Have anyone used a different method for a bailer; eg. plugs, pvc pipes, homemade from fiberglass etc? Do I actually need a bailer, or should I just stop trying to save a few bucks and go for the real thing? I'm already over my intended budget so...:(
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#3
Looking around for a cheap bailer (yes I'm kind of cheap), and someone offered me a kayak bailer (didn't know kayaks used bailers) from an Aqua-Terra kayak that supposedly will work fine on my SF.

Does anyone knows anything about using a different bailer on a SF whether it is this aqua-terra one or any other bailer method? Have anyone used a different method for a bailer; eg. plugs, pvc pipes, homemade from fiberglass etc?

Do I actually need a bailer, or should I just stop trying to save a few bucks and go for the real thing? I'm already over my intended budget so...:(
Do you need a bailer, no..., it's a convenience.

The low budget alternatives are scoops and sponges...






Bailers come in a variety of types and sizes. The Sunfish bailer is a little nicer to bare feet than most.




You can adapt whatever you wish.

I don't see the Perception Kayak, Aqua Terra boat's bailer as an accessory part. You may need to speak to a dealer about what hull thickness it works with and how to special order one. I'm skeptical about using a CPR mask's one-way valve, but you might devise a design of your own using the concept ... don't forget Bernoulli too.

.
 
#4
Mine doesn't work either. Do what Wayne recommended, the cut off milk jug and sponge. I use a grout sponge, used for tiling, it holds a ton of water.

If I can balance it I'll open the bailer underway, suck out the water and reseal it.

Nick
 

Trueke

New Member
Thread starter #5


[ I'm skeptical about using a CPR mask's one-way valve, but you might devise a design of your own using the concept]

This was intended as a joke


... don't forget Bernoulli too.

.[/quote]

You had to drag him in didn't you?
 
#6
You can't just open the bailer hole and expect the water to be sucked out because the shape of the bailer in the water creates the low pressure to draw out the water.
If you can't pay for a regular bailer, just plug the hole and use one of the above methods to dump the water. You don't get much water in the cockpit unless you're smashing waves or going down wind like a submarine.

Fred
 
#7
Fred,

My boat is an older 67 model, and the ball doesn't seal. The bailer functions underway, however it doesn't seal when stopped.

I wouldn't recommend opening a hole in the boat either :D

Nick
 
#8
Who said put a hole in the boat? The hole referred to the bailer. If the ball doesn't seal at all, replace the ball. My ball lets some water in when moving slowly but the water leaves when moving quickly. Does everybody want a perfectly dry boat? Lots of luck with that. Are you wearing your Sunday shoes?

Fred
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#9
My boat is an older 67 model, and the ball doesn't seal.
Yup, it's an imperfect system.

The buoyancy of the back flow check ball isn't sufficient to form a tight seal with the rubber o-ring.
That's why there's a back-up. On the metal bailer, screw the cap closed, on the current design, put the stopper in.


A ball in good shape and a fresh o-ring help though.

.
 
#10
...like the rest of them say, the bailer is a good idea, (on paper) but they don't work perfectly, (I even have a new plastic one), . I too, use a large grout sponge. It works as a bailer and while sailing in soft wind, I clean the boat with it.
And at the end of a day of sailing, I again use it to clean the deck and hull off when on the trailer.
 
Thread starter #11
Thanks all. In reality I do plan to eventually buy a new bailer but just wanted to see what alternatives I had and whether I could take it out for a run mean while. I will be sailing in very calm protected waters, and I guess it will be alright to just plug the hole, bring a sponge and a clorox jug and just scratch this itch. Just one more thing. If I am not permanently sealing that hole, what can be used to temporarily close it. Please no stuffed rags....:p
 
#12
"(yes I'm kind of cheap)", I just thought that you were looking for a cheap way, a $2 sponge, or a $46 replacement bailer. I don't even bother using the new bailer that I had put on, the sponge takes care of it. Oh well...
 
Thread starter #13
"(yes I'm kind of cheap)", I just thought that you were looking for a cheap way, a $2 sponge, or a $46 replacement bailer. I don't even bother using the new bailer that I had put on, the sponge takes care of it. Oh well...
Oh but I am looking for a cheap way out. However I will eventually like the thing working as intended. Right now, I am just looking for a cheap way to get it in the water and start sailing...Thanks to you guys I will be doing so pretty soon with a sponge, and then, within the next year, a bailer will be bought (have to save my $$$...educators are being laid-off by the gross in NJ right now...) Any ideason how to plug that whole???
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#14
Oh but I am looking for a cheap way out. Any ideas on how to plug that whole???
There's the good ol' rubber stopper ... use the hole to install a little eye bolt for tethering. Found at hardware stores and hobby shops everywhere.


... and there are expanding bailer plugs found at most boating suppliers.


As you alluded earlier, get creative with PVC



... just remember, when you are aboard, the cockpit
floor sits below the waterline so seriously, don't forget Bernoulli.




Some days are better than others ... keep smiling.
 

Attachments

#15
Funny story: The gentleman I bought my fish from tried to tell me that the bailer in the cockpit was actually to let water IN to the boat to act as a balast. I looked at him and said that I was pretty sure that was to be a one way valve. He looked at me puzzled and then I had to show him how the ball in there worked.

But it was good to know that the bailer didn't work corectly before I popped it open underway. Had to unstick the ball and it works better now.
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#16
Funny story: The gentleman I bought my fish from tried to tell me that the bailer in the cockpit was actually to let water IN to the boat to act as a balast.

Maybe I've had it wrong all these years...,
those Sunfish weren't water logged after all,
it's a ballast system

:eek:





NOT



 
#17

walmart has something similar to this in their boating dept. One of my boats came with one instead of a bailer cap.

I have an intact metal bailer cap if anyone needs it.
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
#18
Funny story: The gentleman I bought my fish from tried to tell me that the bailer in the cockpit was actually to let water IN to the boat to act as a balast. I looked at him and said that I was pretty sure that was to be a one way valve. He looked at me puzzled and then I had to show him how the ball in there worked.
This thread is taking an interesting turn; :)
In defense of the above mentioned gentleman, some boats are designed to take in water (in a tank on the windward side) as ballast. However, this technology is not Sunfish class legal....

 
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