Running the mainsheet from the back?

#21
Considering the additional leverage on the boom from a force at the rear, can the boom be more easily broken at the gooseneck or elsewhere?

Fred
 
#22
The most efficient place to mount your mainsheet is at the end of the boom, with the mainsheet pulling down at a right angle to the boom. Obviously this won't work on a SF as the end of the boom is aft of the transom. The next best thing would be to run it as far aft as possible. The further forward you attach the mainsheet to the boom the greater the loads are on the hardware at that point.
 
Thread starter #23
Talked to the manufacture today. In their perspective, running a 2:1 purchase with a harken 57mm ratchet/cam/swivel with becket on the bridal and the rear traveler block on the boom, shouldn't be an issue. They said, it could possibly be harder to sheet in, but load wise they said it should be ok. Though they were not entirely sure, i'm going to move forward and see if this works at all. Hopefully at least it will be better on those light to moderate wind days where it is enjoyable to bring more people along, and switch it to the normal setup for those windy days solo.

BC
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#24
We have a similar setup when I’m flying airplanes, so the crew knows who has flight controls (called positive exchange of flight controls). Very effective, eliminates a lot of mishaps
… a communication practice adopted from sailing ships. :rolleyes:



It definitely seems that you can dial in some curve to the boom with the vang. I won't profess to be an expert on Sunfish trim, but I've spent plenty of time racing keelboats.
The Sunfish vang is described and illustrated both in The Sunfish Bible and at the Starboard Passage website.
http://www.starboardpassage.com


My vintage 1969 Ratsey sail has a ton of draft in it. I started wondering how exactly how you control the draft on the sail. On a conventional boat, you'd use the outhaul and backstay
Have you run out of outhaul (and uphaul) adjustment? If so, your sail is blown out … time for a new sail.



Considering the additional leverage on the boom from a force at the rear, can the boom be more easily broken at the gooseneck or elsewhere?
That was my thought too. It will be the calculated risk, especially with two adults aboard in a strong wind.



Talked to the manufacture today. In their perspective, running a 2:1 purchase with a harken 57mm ratchet/cam/swivel with becket on the bridal and the rear traveler block on the boom, shouldn't be an issue. They said, it could possibly be harder to sheet in
You can always go to a 3:1 system.
 
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