Roof racking or trailering... Vote for which you like best?

Vote which method you prefer: Roof racking or trailering


  • Total voters
    34

CaptainAhab

Active Member
#3
Two people are required to car top a single handed Laser. Your comment about hull stress is incorrect. I prefer dolly's on trailers. Completely self sufficient.
 
#4
I talked to a boat repair guy and he said the metal gunwale supports on the kitty hawk type trailers can damage the boat, I think it all depends on how far you trailer the boat and what type of surface you drive on,

For short trips like going to practice I like to put my dolly on the trailer so I can go singlehanded, there are a few different methods but they all seem to work well

for longer trips I usually trailer the hull upside down on the trailer with sufficient padding to absorb shock, so I use some foam padding under the deck where it contacts the trailer, then put soft padding under the straps to again spread the load out and protect the hull from scratches, this has worked pretty well

I've got more dings on my lasers from car topping, sometimes because there are protruding eyes in the racks or just the fact that its tough to load on some cars, It also seems to take alot more time to tie it down,

the laser fits pretty well in pickup bed's, even the shorter 6ft beds work, you can also fit two lasers on a pickup pretty easily, I've done that a bunch of times
 

torrid

Just sailing
#6
My rule of thumb is this - if I'm a long distance where I have to stop for the night, I cartop. Otherwise I trailer. There's a certain amount of extra hassle in securing the boat for cartopping, so there is a threshold to make it worth my while.
 
#7
Both.... I keep the boat at home on a trailer, I can load it on the car by myself by having extra long roof bars. I trailer to anything that is less than ~3 hrs away and car top to anything that's farther, particularly when going north-east of Washington DC where cartopping cuts the tolls by almost half and allows using some of the NYC parkways that are off limits to trailers.
 

AlanD

Former ISAF Laser Measurer
#8
Your comment about hull stress is incorrect. I prefer dolly's on trailers. Completely self sufficient.
That depends so much on the trolley. Most of the Australian built trolleys are rigid (fully welded) trolleys with the gunnels, which are ideal. Some of the international trolleys the boats are supported on their bottoms and the trolleys are made of aluminium with plastic joints, hence not really rigid and not that ideal for long trips. Even some of the Australian aluminium trolleys fail when used over long distance trips.
 

AlanD

Former ISAF Laser Measurer
#9
Having two cars damaged by the using roof racks, I'm hesitant to put a boat ever again on the roof racks. Modern roof racks are better but a laser is relatively heavy and creates a lot of windage.
 
#10
Having two cars damaged by the using roof racks, I'm hesitant to put a boat ever again on the roof racks. Modern roof racks are better but a laser is relatively heavy and creates a lot of windage.
That's a good point Alan, you're definitely not going to damage the trailer by loading a laser
 
#11
Trailer for sure. I have my Right-On trailer. Boat lives on the dolly and rarely leaves the yacht club (although I'm hoping to change that this year), but when I do need to trailer it it's really simple to get it up there and the Seitech holds the boat by the gunwales.
 
#13
I have used both Kitty Hawk and Trailex trailers. Both come with pivot bow support so you can load it by yourself. You can also double stack your buddies' boat for long road trips. I break down the trolley and put it in the trunk or put on top of the inverted second boat.
 
#14
Used a Rhino Rack T-loader. At 67 and after four shoulder surgeries I can load my Laser onto the topper which is on my Toyota Tundra. It is long way up there, but not difficult with the t-loader.
 

andyatos

Active Member
#15
Used a Rhino Rack T-loader. At 67 and after four shoulder surgeries I can load my Laser onto the topper which is on my Toyota Tundra. It is long way up there, but not difficult with the t-loader.
Thanks for posting about the Rhino Rack T-Loader. I take it you load it hull up, deck down, correct? And is the webbing strap that goes across wide enough to handle the width of the beam of the Laser? Or do you have to lift the stern above that webbing and T as you push it the rest of the way on to the top of your Tundra?

Thanks,

- Andy
 
#16
Have loaded it upright. Ordered a wider bar,1650mm, to make it easier to load it upside down.

The strap will not be long enough. Will add my own strap.
 

Voodoo 158546

Hard hiking at the end of a 3hr race, killer
#19
I used to roof rack it everywhere.
Cost of dedicated roof bars - £30 on ebay.
Versus
Cost of dedicated electronic hook up for car inc. towbar & labour £995 ( vw quote, new golf still in warranty )
Cost of trailer - £250 - £350
Cost of storing the trailer £90 pa

Then there's the worry some fker will nick it, UK roads fairly suk and lasers ain't heavy enough to activate trailer suspension so the gunnels or deck take the abuse.
The kick up of road dross/tar/stones ain't fun on the hull, cover or not.

I used to have a vw bay van, I used to put the laser on the roof solo no probs.
Standing the boat up on the transom next to the van, rest the bow on the sponge on the roof bars and bench press the stern up and over..
 
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