Repeated capsizing

#21
Not sure about the Capri... but most of these smaller boats have the deck sealed to the hull in a permanent manner. Some Sunfish have had the deck successfully separated from the hull and been resealed, but its not something that I would recommend trying. My bet is a professional shop would just tell you that it can't be done.

Typical for gaining access to do the modifications you list would be to cut holes and install "inspection ports"
Its pretty easy to get up to 5 inch hole saws and a 5 inch dia (nominal... actual hole you cut may be 5.5 inches) port is under $10. Cut the hole and do the work then install the port since the ring will reduce the hole available to put your hand through. Covers either snap in or 1/4 turn and then lock in place.
Lots of threads are in the Sunfish and Laser sections about installing the ports and doing work through the holes in the deck.

Ports are also available in other sizes including large enough to crawl through.
 
#22
Duly noted about the transom. Now could I get some kind of pressure injected foam that could be shot in through a small access hole in a fairly large quantity while the boat was level? If the foam was stiff maybe enough could be injected providing sufficient body to hold level in the needed area and just let the rest go where it goes. I also wish it had the larger trailer line eye on the bow like the newer versions. Mine is part of the plate that secures the forestay, a poor angle for the line to draw the boat on to the trailer.
@aquaman did you ever do this? Are you happy with it? Does it seem solid? Any pictures of the process?
 

kkolkebeck

Airflow Doctor
#23
centerboard was locked by means of lines cleated, it was definitely down when capsize occurred.

As for cleating sheets, I can't imagine just holding the line and controlling the sail that way. I would've been beat to death. I keep the sheet in my hand, yes, but did not seem practical to leave it uncleated the whole time. I'll try to pay more attention to that next time I go out.

I was hoping for some feedback on ideal or recommended wind conditions for a green learning environment.
This thread is three years old but I am a long time sailor, bought a Mod 2 last year and had similar issues. I've spent decades sailing and racing my 23 ft. keel boat in the lower Hudson, Long Island Sound, and in New England. We moved inland to a lake, I sold the Sonar and bought the Capri. Going from a keel boat to a dingy was a learning experience, and add to that moving from an area where we sailed in open water to the confines of a lake and all the shifts that go with it. I have become proficient both single handling and with crew but there was a learning curve.
  • First, this isn't a keel boat where you can have a dance in the cockpit or bow and it's really stable. When walking around you need to have both the rudder in and centerboard down if you want stability. That said, at the dock the unweighted centerboard doesn't counter balance your weight, it just slows the roll if you go to one side or the other. Underway you get lift in the centerboard so it is much more stable.
  • Second, my boat didn't have hiking straps or a hiking stick and they are a necessity. The folks I bought it from complained of flipping and the way the boat was rigged I can see why. If you don’t have the gear to allow you to hike out, you will be really limited in wind speed you can sail in.
  • Third, spend the money on a Hobie Baby Bob rather than dealing with the anxiety that it might turtle. Likewise find the article in this forum about adding a ladder and do that as this isn't the easiest boat to get back into. I’m almost 70 and the first time I flipped I needed to be rescued because I couldn't get back in the boat.
  • Next, the jib sheets on my boat were really fat, like half inch and as such they didn't run free through the cleat and fairlead. They would twist and get stuck in the fairlead. I have read that some say take the fairlead off but to me that would be a pain single handing. Better to replace the sheet with 5/16" as recommended in the Class handbook (but I think you could use 1/4"), and keep it at least as long as specified by the class. That said you need to make sure the line runs free (avoid butt cleats). When sailing single handed I keep the sheet draped over my knee so that I can get at it fast, otherwise it is the crew’s job.
  • Make sure that you make the modification suggested in the class handbook for the rope traveler which limits block travel. This allows you to get the boom into the boat better which makes it easier to trim harder and point higher.
  • Next, roller furling really is a blessing when the wind pipes up. Make sure the furling line runs back into the cockpit where you can get at it in a hurry and replace the cleat that comes with the boat with a small cam cleat with a fairlead. With this set up you can easily reset it without going forward to wrap it around a cleat. Trim in the sail area to reduce heel and weather-helm (tendency of the boat to want to head up). The boat sails just OK without a jib so even when blowing hard I usually have some amount of jib cloth exposed.
  • Next, you absolutely have to get used to sailing with the main sheet uncleated as most experienced sailors do. And in a dingy there is a reason for it, you can ease or release the line quickly if you are getting knocked over. Learn to sheet it in or out quickly by two handing it with the fair end held by the hand with the hiking stick.
  • When tacking singlehanded, the high boom allows you to stand up with feet across the cockpit so you can balance the boat. Learn to tack facing forward by passing the tiller behind you (lots of people spin backwards and unless you have eyes in your butt this is dangerous), transferring the sheet and hiking stick as you do. Just before I start to tack I release the jib sheet so that it flaps. Just take care that it doesn't get caught on one of the mast cleats. Once the tack is complete you can sheet in the main and then the jib.
  • Lakes are tricky, especially when you don’t know where the holes are. By holding the sheet in your hand uncleated, if you get disastrously shifted (>90 degrees) you can at least dump the main which gives you a second or two to dump the jib. If this happens during a tack, standing up really helps you shift your weight quickly where as if you are on the seat or rail you can’t.
  • When sailing tight to the wind if the boat heels, hike out more. If you are nervous about that, the first thing to do is just gently feather up into the wind a bit so the jib depowers. Feathering up and down will keep the boat moving without a lot of drama.
  • When really windy, lots of cunningham and outhaul will flatten the sail and make it less powerful. Adding vang (yes, even up wind and this is called vang sheeting) also makes the main sail flatter and depowers it.
  • As for wind speeds, I would keep it below 10 until you feel comfortable. Now that I have become used to the boat I’ve had it out alone in 15 and gusting without much problem. The Capri 14.2 is a nice sailing little boat, perfect for our lake.
 
#24
After 2 seasons under my belt with Capri I can offer the following which has been learned through experiance:
1. My small Minkota has served me well. Docking, manuevering around other boat traffic, sail hoisting, etc. Also this year I'm having a canopy made to place over the boom for sun protection when not sailing. On hot light air days it's nice to just motor out, drop anchor, and chill. Now when under sail it's easy to lift the motor straight up, turn sideways (keeps the lower unit clear from the rudder). And essential to install the motor mount purchased through Catalina Direct.
2. For battery I have a pair of Odyssey PC 680's which can be connected in series. On days when minimal motoring is anticipated I just drop in one, otherwise both together results in decent running time performance. Always remove them when boat's not in use, which is another reason why it's better to have 2 smaller rather than one larger. Built a custom battery holding setup just inside the cuddy and it would be a pain to try horsing a large heavy unit into that space. And you need to be sure battery is securely stowed, a loose unit could cause a lot of damage. Also installed circuit breaker and battery level gauge.
3. Tiller Tender is essential for single handling, locks tiller in place.
4. Modified sails as follows: a. Slugs installed in main to allow for easy hoisting while underway. b. Reef points enhance stability on windy days. c. Oversized brass hanks installed on jib allow for a second tag line to be run inside so I can hoist/lower jib while underway. Didn't see the logic to trash a perfectly good jib and pay $500 for a new roller furling setup, and it also would have been harder to deal with when raising/lowering mast. d. Shortened the factory jib sheets to the minimum needed (do this through dry run trial). Also downsized diameter a bit factory version is way too thick. The cockpit's cluttered enough as it is!
5. Installed Baby Bob. It's agreed that there's some windage penalty to have that thing sitting way up there, and it does look a bit weird. I had a bracket made up which allows for easy on/off, that way I only need to use it when conditions warrant. And you definetely don't want to trailer with it hanging on top of mast. After 2 seasons there were only a few times when I could have gone over, but my seat of the pants feel for Capri kept that from happening.
6. Matching sail size to wind conditions: I've been in 20-25 knots with reefed main only and it works well. Agreed that you don't get optimal pointing without jib, but under those conditions who cares? I'd rather be sailing than sitting on the dock. And if wind recedes it's easy for me to hoist jib which is tube bungeed to the deck, kept taught with one cleated sheet line, ready to go. Once again, sail changes while underway can only be made if you have a Tiller Tender.
7. Boarding Ladder: I'm an old fart at 65 years but still in pretty good shape. Installed a ladder that makes it easy to snap myself up from the drink and drop into cockpit. Use it on those hot days when I will drop my 8 lb mushroom anchor and then take a plunge to cool off.
8. Mounting things on transom: Now keep in mind that is a whole arena that must be addressed by itself. If not done properly you will be in a world of hurt!
9. Fixed vs. swing keel versions of Capri: After 5 years of Lake Michigan sailing on my beloved Catalina 22 I can make the following observations.....
The stability enjoyed with a heavily weighted keel boat just ain't happening with the swing board Capri. I lost my incentive to drop a few pounds in favor of gaining additional hiking leverage when going to weather! And it's really not a rough water boat, I tried Lake Michigan once and quickly returned with tail between legs. Better off staying with small/medium sized lakes because if you do go over the water tends to be warmer, calmer, and help more readily available. Now if I was to keep boat permanently moored in the water for the season would definately get the fixed keel (200 lbs?) version, which would solve the issue. Now what I do gain with swing version is ease of trailerability (which I do a lot of), ease of launch/retrieval (I'm a single hander and mostly do everything alone), ease of storage (sits much lower on trailer), and ease of dragging it around with my small hand dolly so it can be ideally stored on my property.

Now I think I've touched on all the things brought to the table through my 2 years of experiance. Most of what I did was learned from this chat room, for which I'm grateful. Suggest you browse through the threads, if you want more specifics I'd be happy to post more details when I have the time.
Fair Winds!
 
#25
After 2 seasons under my belt with Capri I can offer the following which has been learned through experiance:
1. My small Minkota has served me well. Docking, manuevering around other boat traffic, sail hoisting, etc. Also this year I'm having a canopy made to place over the boom for sun protection when not sailing. On hot light air days it's nice to just motor out, drop anchor, and chill. Now when under sail it's easy to lift the motor straight up, turn sideways (keeps the lower unit clear from the rudder). And essential to install the motor mount purchased through Catalina Direct.
2. For battery I have a pair of Odyssey PC 680's which can be connected in series. On days when minimal motoring is anticipated I just drop in one, otherwise both together results in decent running time performance. Always remove them when boat's not in use, which is another reason why it's better to have 2 smaller rather than one larger. Built a custom battery holding setup just inside the cuddy and it would be a pain to try horsing a large heavy unit into that space. And you need to be sure battery is securely stowed, a loose unit could cause a lot of damage. Also installed circuit breaker and battery level gauge.
3. Tiller Tender is essential for single handling, locks tiller in place.
4. Modified sails as follows: a. Slugs installed in main to allow for easy hoisting while underway. b. Reef points enhance stability on windy days. c. Oversized brass hanks installed on jib allow for a second tag line to be run inside so I can hoist/lower jib while underway. Didn't see the logic to trash a perfectly good jib and pay $500 for a new roller furling setup, and it also would have been harder to deal with when raising/lowering mast. d. Shortened the factory jib sheets to the minimum needed (do this through dry run trial). Also downsized diameter a bit factory version is way too thick. The cockpit's cluttered enough as it is!
5. Installed Baby Bob. It's agreed that there's some windage penalty to have that thing sitting way up there, and it does look a bit weird. I had a bracket made up which allows for easy on/off, that way I only need to use it when conditions warrant. And you definetely don't want to trailer with it hanging on top of mast. After 2 seasons there were only a few times when I could have gone over, but my seat of the pants feel for Capri kept that from happening.
6. Matching sail size to wind conditions: I've been in 20-25 knots with reefed main only and it works well. Agreed that you don't get optimal pointing without jib, but under those conditions who cares? I'd rather be sailing than sitting on the dock. And if wind recedes it's easy for me to hoist jib which is tube bungeed to the deck, kept taught with one cleated sheet line, ready to go. Once again, sail changes while underway can only be made if you have a Tiller Tender.
7. Boarding Ladder: I'm an old fart at 65 years but still in pretty good shape. Installed a ladder that makes it easy to snap myself up from the drink and drop into cockpit. Use it on those hot days when I will drop my 8 lb mushroom anchor and then take a plunge to cool off.
8. Mounting things on transom: Now keep in mind that is a whole arena that must be addressed by itself. If not done properly you will be in a world of hurt!
9. Fixed vs. swing keel versions of Capri: After 5 years of Lake Michigan sailing on my beloved Catalina 22 I can make the following observations.....
The stability enjoyed with a heavily weighted keel boat just ain't happening with the swing board Capri. I lost my incentive to drop a few pounds in favor of gaining additional hiking leverage when going to weather! And it's really not a rough water boat, I tried Lake Michigan once and quickly returned with tail between legs. Better off staying with small/medium sized lakes because if you do go over the water tends to be warmer, calmer, and help more readily available. Now if I was to keep boat permanently moored in the water for the season would definately get the fixed keel (200 lbs?) version, which would solve the issue. Now what I do gain with swing version is ease of trailerability (which I do a lot of), ease of launch/retrieval (I'm a single hander and mostly do everything alone), ease of storage (sits much lower on trailer), and ease of dragging it around with my small hand dolly so it can be ideally stored on my property.

Now I think I've touched on all the things brought to the table through my 2 years of experiance. Most of what I did was learned from this chat room, for which I'm grateful. Suggest you browse through the threads, if you want more specifics I'd be happy to post more details when I have the time.
Fair Winds!
 
#26
I have a “optimist mast float”
It’s 4 liters and you run it up in your sail track along with your sail We use it when she’s blowing good for extra insurance. We have tested in shallow waters and you can try to push the mast under water and she always comes up even with hull to windward. The fact that it’s not bolted to your mast means we can also use it across our fleet and we even tested on my brothers hobie 16 with positive results.
I highly recommend this
 

Attachments

#27
Yep in retrospect I probably would have gone your route. The mounting bracket I bought for the Bob is easy to use but there is a bit of a windage penalty I'm afraid. Case in point; last summer I pulled out of the lake when it got super windy. Just by chance had trailer parked beam to the wind. Also not perfectly centered on trailer because I usually lift and shove boat to center when out of water. Unfortunately the off center was to the downwind side. So with boat in this setting I sat in my van to eat lunch and take a short nap. While napping I could feel the wind howling but thought nothing of it. Suddenly I heard a crash and a bunch of people yelling "holy s......"! Sat up and saw Capri laying on it's side on the pavement, still front tethered to trailer with winch line.
The nice people helped me lift boat back on trailer, and I almost puked when I saw the big indentation where boat made contact with pavement. As I pondered what this meant for my boating season and wallet, the indentation suddenly popped out all by itself! Only damage seems to be crazing on the gel coat. Now if there had been a reinforcement secured inside the hull it certainly would have cracked and made for costly repairs, so lucky me.
The point is that I had the Bob on and also the main was flaked to the boom. This presented a lot of windage which created half the problem, along with my carelessness in not centering boat properly on trailer.
I'm also sure that when I sail in 20+ wind (with reefed main only), the Bob does add to the heeling effort on the boat. But conversely if I had your device it would not be at the top of the mast since I'm reefed, maybe would not give the same amount of floatation at the lower height. If I owned the fixed keel Capri would not have to even worry about capsizing, but as we all know the swing board version in a bit on the tender side.
Fair Winds!
 
#28
You can get two of those concrete bricks without holes that weight 30 to 35# each, wrap it in a towel or carpet, place one on each side of centerboard trunk floor. The weight will increase your upright stability markedly if you are not racing or bringing children aboard. One capsize will scare children and some wives forever from sailing. Don't scare them. We are a shrinking sport. The bob is not enough! If not two bricks you can use two batteries.

You cannot prevent sudden gusts of wind. A lifetime of sailing dinghies and big sailboat (in the ocean) has shown me that By the time you let go of the sheets you are over.
 
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