Repairing/Reinforcing "Blind" Holes in Fiberglass

Thread starter #1
The link below is to the write up of a method I’ve used over the years to get reinforcement behind small holes or punctures in composite laminates. This method is much neater than just adding reinforcement to the top of the laminate, which
• mars the surface finish
• usually results in much of the reinforcement just sanded off if the repair is to be faired in

A large metal backer plate is always best for highly stressed hardware like lifting handles or rudder gudgeons, but the method here works well for riveted attachments and for many screwed-on fixtures.

Link to PDF at: https://www.bk410.com/boats/repair_small_holes.pdf
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#3
The link below is to the write up of a method I’ve used over the years to get reinforcement behind small holes or punctures in composite laminates. This method is much neater than just adding reinforcement to the top of the laminate, which
• mars the surface finish
• usually results in much of the reinforcement just sanded off if the repair is to be faired in

A large metal backer plate is always best for highly stressed hardware like lifting handles or rudder gudgeons, but the method here works well for riveted attachments and for many screwed-on fixtures.

Link to PDF at: https://www.bk410.com/boats/repair_small_holes.pdf
Good technique, which would benefit with a slow-set hardener.

I just learned of an even slower hardener for West Systems epoxy--24 hours to "set", with hours of time to work with it. ("pot-time"). 'Think it's called "209".
 
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