Repair Help!

Thread starter #24
Could it be a piece of carpet. Some people insert carpet to protect their daggerboard and make it fit more snugly.
No its actually a hard plastic. I'm going to remove it and see how my daggerboard fits, if it does need to be snugged up i may add a piece of carpet. Any suggestions on what kind of carpet and how to secure it?
 
#25
I just use tabs at the edges, top and bottom. These can be maybe a couple of inches long by about one inch wide. You really want to cover the edges of the trunk where the daggerboard makes contact, and where it scrapes when you lift and lower it.

Once you take out that old plastic shim, put your finger in the trunk at the edges and see if you have a lip inside. Newer boats have a smooth transition from deck to trunk inside, while many older boats have a sharp lip. On those you can feel the sharp edge.

If you have a newer boat with smooth trunk seams, you can put a self stick strip of the fuzzy half of a Velcro tab, or something similar at the fore and aft edges.

If you have sharp edges inside, common on older boats, you may want to use something more robust. Opinions vary, but what I do is save the old factory hiking straps or similar straps and cut them crosswise in one inch strips, or a tad narrower. I use 3m marine or similar adhesive and coat one side of the strip and insert it on the inside trunk edge just below the sharp deck seam.

The idea it to build up that recessed trunk area so it is about flush with the deck lip. Then I insert and adhesive another tab over that, so it is just built up a bit, but the main thing is that the board doesn't scrap. On the bottom of the trunnk the transition from trunk to hull is usually smoother, so I just use one tab.

I use those strap tabs so i get some protection against scaping and impact shocks, without encroaching on the space too much. Keep in mind that if you have an older board now but may upgrade in the future, you don't want to overly restrict the space. Since I use a shock cord to keep the board up, I often just use two tabs, the top (deck end) of the trunk one forward, and the bottom (hull) end aft.

Some folks use indoor/outdoor carpet tabs and such. The material just has to be durable against the board edges scraping.
 
Thread starter #26
PAINT! I am going going to buy paint tomorrow. I am getting some Rustoleum topside and Rustoleum primer. What color is generally used on the hull? I know to avoid a gloss white so I wont go blind; Is it the oyster white? Also, what are the stripe patterns on the deck. I have the Mackinaw sail and was thinking about doing those colors as the stripes; anyone know what colors those are or what would look good with them? I was thinking a navy blue for the larger stripe and battleship gray for the 2 smaller? Also, is there a difference between the 3 stripes and the 2 stripes?

For anyone what has refinished a hull with rustoleum's: does the primer fill most of the scratches?

Garrett
 

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Thread starter #27
So I was starting to fit my new gudgeon backing plate in the hull... It doesn't fit up against the wall of the transom. Has anyone else had this issue?
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#28
So I was starting to fit my new gudgeon backing plate in the hull... It doesn't fit up against the wall of the transom. Has anyone else had this issue?
You probably got the flat backer plate that does not have the "hump" in the middle. What you can do now is get some rot resistant wood (cedar, mahogany, cypress) and make a shim to fill that gap on either side between plate and transom, install with longer bolts. Then hunt down the correct backer plate later. You probably need the pre 1972 style backer plate even if your boat is >1972. The boats were built for years with the carriage bolt cutout still there, but at one point I believe they flattened out the transom.
 

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signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#29
PAINT! I am going going to buy paint tomorrow. I am getting some Rustoleum topside and Rustoleum primer. What color is generally used on the hull? I know to avoid a gloss white so I wont go blind; Is it the oyster white? Also, what are the stripe patterns on the deck. I have the Mackinaw sail and was thinking about doing those colors as the stripes; anyone know what colors those are or what would look good with them? I was thinking a navy blue for the larger stripe and battleship gray for the 2 smaller? Also, is there a difference between the 3 stripes and the 2 stripes?

For anyone what has refinished a hull with rustoleum's: does the primer fill most of the scratches?

1. I've used semigloss white, looks great.

2. the difference in stripes is how old the boat was. Original Sunfish had no stripes. 2 stripes was late 60s. 3 stripes came out in the 70s. For the first 6-8 years there was only a bow stripe. For the mackinaw sail matching stripes, you could go old school and put 2 inch stripes, 2 inches apart, one deep green and one navy blue. Or if you want the 3 stripe set up, do blue-green-blue or green blue green.

3. When we used rustoleum we just prepped scratches with marine tex epoxy putty, sanded and did 2 coats, light sanding between coats. That covered fine. Closer than 3 feet and you could start to pick out some repaired areas. So ask yourself are you going sailing or entering a boat show? I am not a primer kind of guy but others here have great results. The question they could answer is what brand they prefer and whether to thin primer a bit with brushing liquid before application.

Picture is of keel repair in progress, hull with brushed rustoleum
 

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Thread starter #30
You probably got the flat backer plate that does not have the "hump" in the middle. What you can do now is get some rot resistant wood (cedar, mahogany, cypress) and make a shim to fill that gap on either side between plate and transom, install with longer bolts. Then hunt down the correct backer plate later. You probably need the pre 1972 style backer plate even if your boat is >1972. The boats were built for years with the carriage bolt cutout still there, but at one point I believe they flattened out the transom.

I have the bracket with the hump in the middle. The issue is that its not fitting over the hump on the boat. So I am going to find something to make a shim to secure it.

As for paint I got some rustoleum painter's touch primer (Marine safe and works almost like topside just not as durable). I plan on doing 2 coats of primer with some sanding in between. Then finishing it off with 2 coats of rustoleum topside semi gloss white. All of which is going to be sprayed on.

Stripes: I got some gloss deep blue and some gloss gray. Thinking about doing gray blue gray. Then painting the coaming deep blue. I think this will look pretty slick. Anyone else think so?

Garrett
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#31
In that case I wouldn't worry about shims, the 4 bolts will keep it snug and gudgeon will stay tight against transom.

The boat is your canvas, paint what you like! In my case the Skipper picks the colors

KB
 

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Thread starter #32
In that case I wouldn't worry about shims, the 4 bolts will keep it snug and gudgeon will stay tight against transom.

The boat is your canvas, paint what you like! In my case the Skipper picks the colors

KB
No shims even if the gap between the ends of the bracket (where the bolts will go) and the transom is a 1/4" ?
 
Thread starter #34
So do not use Rustoleum's Painter's Touch Primer under topisde paint. Painter's touch is a water based primer and topside is oil-based. I guess the salesman was, well, a salesman and not a wealth of accurate information. Luckily I found out before I painted :rolleyes:


What have other's used as a primer under Rustoleum's Topside paint.

Thanks,
Garrett
 

danpal

Active Member
#35
Rustoleum has a marine primer that's supposed to be used under the topside paint. I just purchased it so I'll let you know how it goes although it could be a while.
 
Thread starter #36
So I talked to an "expert" and he said it would be fine to use the rustoleum painters touch primer under the topside. Im going to trust his advice and hope all goes well.

After MANY hours of sanding, fiberglassing, sanding, marine texing, sanding, and sanding its finally ready for primer and paint!!

Paint 1.jpg
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#38
Make sure to use a close cell foam roller designed for your paint, regular roller will give you lots of bubbles. I recommend having a good 2 inch brush ready to tip, as you will most likely have some bubbles. Topside levels well but the bubbles may not pop.
 
Thread starter #39
So the bottom is done (and I am very happy with how it came out!) and I have a couple more coats to put on the top! I'm preparing my hardware etc and I need to get rivets. What size rivets are used for the trim on a 1971 boat?

T-Minus 4 Days till vacation!

Garrett
 

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L&VW

Well-Known Member
#40
Most of your issues can be addressed with white MarineTex. Especially if you are looking for cheap, effective repair that will last. You can get it at West Marine or any of the on-line vendors who advertise on this site.
On my first Sunfish's hull, I used automobile-type filler and gave it a couple of coats of regular white Rustoleum. I got a good glossy coat, but I've only just learned with my third Sunfish to use more thinner for a smooth coat.

Now I come to my in-between (second) Sunfish—probably the best one of three. The hull appears to have no damage, except that it appears to have been dragged everywhere it went. :(

My question is this, does this hull need a professional re-gel-coating, or can I apply Marine-Tex (or something else) to bring the condition up to "very smooth"? Hopefully, a photo of the very worst part P8100004.JPG will appear below:
 
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