Refurbishing a Vintage SF - Where to Start

Thread starter #21
Really? I didn't think it was that bad. I admit that it's a bit heavy, and there are a few places to patch, but I've seen boats in worse condition get a renovation and look really good. But, yes, it's a labor of love for me and I enjoy being able to work on the boat to improve its condition. I have the time and it's worth it to me, especially to see my kids, nephews, nieces, etc. get a chance to enjoy the boat at the lake.

Well, thanks for your input. I'll keep updating as things go along.
 
#22
No question it appears pretty rough, but nothing that can't be fixed. If you ever doubt yourself, just take another look at the job signal charlie did on 'Merci'. My hat is off to him... I'd never seen a boat in THAT condition brought back to life!
I'm fortunate in that with four Sunfish and a Daysailer, I've always got something to sail while I'm working on one or the other.
Keep us posted on your progress.
 
#23
Btw. To answer your question about the backing plate, I don't think it's that critical.... Maybe 2 1/2 x 2 1/2.... Marine plywood epoxied to the deck underside. I've always used stainless bolts with a washer instead of screws so it never has to be done again. I'd think you'd want to go ahead and replace the cleat backing as well, as long as you're there.
 
Thread starter #24
I am thinking the exact same thing. I like your idea about using a washer with stainless bolts though. That would make much more sense than doing wood over again. I believe that's what I'll do.

I've been thinking of ways that I might repair the bow. The damage goes all the way through the fiberglass so this will have to be repaired from the inside. I'm thinking that I might be able to cut/file/grind away the damaged fiberglass and do a blind patch. If not, then I'll have to install another inspection port just aft of the bow handle to gain access to the inner bow. I'm not sure about having three inspection ports on the deck (this one up front, one just aft of the mast step that I will use to repair the backing plates, and one at the rear of the boat). I don't like the way that I'm imagining this would look cosmetically.

Do you think I could get away with doing a blind patch on the bow? I imagine that I would have to use something a bit stiffer than cardboard but also would provide enough flex so that when I apply pressure it bends to conform to the shape of the hull interior at the bow.
 
#26
I am thinking the exact same thing. I like your idea about using a washer with stainless bolts though. That would make much more sense than doing wood over again. I believe that's what I'll do.

I've been thinking of ways that I might repair the bow. The damage goes all the way through the fiberglass so this will have to be repaired from the inside. I'm thinking that I might be able to cut/file/grind away the damaged fiberglass and do a blind patch. If not, then I'll have to install another inspection port just aft of the bow handle to gain access to the inner bow. I'm not sure about having three inspection ports on the deck (this one up front, one just aft of the mast step that I will use to repair the backing plates, and one at the rear of the boat). I don't like the way that I'm imagining this would look cosmetically.

Do you think I could get away with doing a blind patch on the bow? I imagine that I would have to use something a bit stiffer than cardboard but also would provide enough flex so that when I apply pressure it bends to conform to the shape of the hull interior at the bow.
Just to be clear, I would use the bolt and washers AND the plywood to spread out the load.
I'm no expert, but I've repaired a lot of Sunfish, and can only tell you what I would do with the bow. Signal Charlie or someone else might have some better ideas.
First, I have two inspections ports on all my boats... One in the back and one behind or in front the splash guard. This is a necessity to get good air flow for drying. If you can avoid any more than that... Good!
As for the bow, I'm assuming your talking about the top and not the front? I would use a piece from the inspection port cutout, cut it to a size larger than the hole to be repaired, and drill a small hole in the middle of it. I'm imagining you could get it inside the hull either through the deck or through the bow itself? Put a piece of string through the hole in the backing patch, wet out it and the inside of the hull where it will be placed, then add some colloidal silica to your epoxy and glop it generously on the patch. Work it into place and pull the string tight to hold it in place til it dries. You can then fill and fair as needed. I fixed an 8" hole on the side of one of our club boats this way and its held up fine....
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#27
I guess this is a labor of love, but in reality, this boat is in terrible shape. It will take many hours (labor and drying) and dollars to get it in shape to actually go sailing. But some on this Forum seem to enjoy to journey more than the destination.
"Not all who wander are lost". ;)
 
#28
Let the fun begin! It had been stored over 10 years, looks to be in pretty good shape, but really dirty, full of leaves and spiders, mast is straight, tiller is very good, daggerboard has some splits and a loose screw , like me. Has an old metal bailer, coaming is good. May be a little heavy, like me! I've read a lot of the restoration information, so I started by a good washing and got the moaning chair out. After I washed it, there is a silverish crud remaining. It scraps off. But that may take some time. I think all I am going to NEED to buy are some new lines, but I WANT to buy a pretty new sail and paint the stripes yellow, add a cam cleat and a mast cleat, and a cover! I'm sure the list will grow.. Sorry if the pics aren't right, three before and one after cleaning. This is more fun than my Birthday!
 

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signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#29
I am thinking the exact same thing. I like your idea about using a washer with stainless bolts though. That would make much more sense than doing wood over again. I believe that's what I'll do.

I've been thinking of ways that I might repair the bow. The damage goes all the way through the fiberglass so this will have to be repaired from the inside. I'm thinking that I might be able to cut/file/grind away the damaged fiberglass and do a blind patch. If not, then I'll have to install another inspection port just aft of the bow handle to gain access to the inner bow. I'm not sure about having three inspection ports on the deck (this one up front, one just aft of the mast step that I will use to repair the backing plates, and one at the rear of the boat). I don't like the way that I'm imagining this would look cosmetically.

Do you think I could get away with doing a blind patch on the bow? I imagine that I would have to use something a bit stiffer than cardboard but also would provide enough flex so that when I apply pressure it bends to conform to the shape of the hull interior at the bow.

1. The block helps spread the load, so I'd keep that and use the machine screw/nut/bolt method if desired.

2. Blind patch with cardboard will work great on that area, you can get a nice v shape. It only has to be about one inch bigger than the hole. Do a dry fit first to make sure patch will go inside the hull, but don't push it all the way in. Use a filler to thicken the epoxy like west 406 and remember your blind patch will have a few layers of fiberglass cloth as well. Once you wet the cardboard and fiberglass you need to get the patch in place ASAP, the cardboard will get soggy but eventually dry and harden.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#30
Let the fun begin! It had been stored over 10 years, looks to be in pretty good shape, but really dirty, full of leaves and spiders, mast is straight, tiller is very good, daggerboard has some splits and a loose screw , like me. Has an old metal bailer, coaming is good. May be a little heavy, like me! I've read a lot of the restoration information, so I started by a good washing and got the moaning chair out. After I washed it, there is a silverish crud remaining. It scraps off. But that may take some time. I think all I am going to NEED to buy are some new lines, but I WANT to buy a pretty new sail and paint the stripes yellow, add a cam cleat and a mast cleat, and a cover! I'm sure the list will grow.. Sorry if the pics aren't right, three before and one after cleaning. This is more fun than my Birthday!

Hey can we get a close up of that sticker behind the coaming?
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#32
Here's the two, the one behind the coaming, and the one in the cockpit. I'm having difficulties reading the serial number on the transom, looks pretty beat up. Why did you want to see this?
I have never seen the actual sticker on the deck, all I have ever seen is the shadow from where a sticker used to be, and I was curious if it had a serial number on it.

Post a picture of the Hull ID Number from upper right transom if there is one and we can maybe decipher it.
 
#33
I have never seen the actual sticker on the deck, all I have ever seen is the shadow from where a sticker used to be, and I was curious if it had a serial number on it.

Post a picture of the Hull ID Number from upper right transom if there is one and we can maybe decipher it.
Hull ID looks like a 74 I had to sand off some bottom paint to find it. So the hull had been painted. I've sanded most of that off, do I need to sand all of it off before I repaint?

Then I don't know what to do about the cracks in the cockpit, and how to repaint the cockpit?
This has been fairly easy, and I am a total novice at all of this!
 

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#37
Just finishing up the fairing of the hull. Found a great sanding gadget for the hull.
I may try that, when does the painting start and what are you using? My primer and easypoxy should be here today. I need to do some more sanding, then acetone and taping off the alum trim. I'll post a pic of before and after.
 
Thread starter #38
Ill prime and paint the hull later. In a few months maybe. Just flipped her over to start working on the deck. I've removed all of the hardware and am trying to remove the splash guard but there are five bolts the spin free but won't come out.

Any suggestions on how to remove them?
 
#40
First coat of easypoxy primer, before and after, I'll let it dry tonight then sand and 2nd coat tomorrow. It filled a lot of the spider cracks, but I still have some pinholes. Mistakes made, should have worn gloves, and should have shook the paint, and stirred a lot more first. I poured some of it out and had to repour it into the can to remix. I can also tell that I should have used a bit more marine tex in areas and sanded more.
 

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