Ratchet block with cam

BobMcT

Member
Wow. I'm a little more perplexed. I didn't realize there are 3 Harken blocks with cam cleat: 2615 (no ratchet), 2138 (ratchet), and 2627 (auto ratchet). A bit confused now which combo would be best.
 

norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Here's the one Andy and I put on my boat. I really like this integrated block and cleat. Hope to sail soon Andy!
 

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BobMcT

Member
Here's the one Andy and I put on my boat. I really like this integrated block and cleat. Hope to sail soon Andy!
The one in the pic isn't a 2138 as LaLi mentioned above. The 2615 and 2627 look like that except the 2627 is an auto ratchet block. Is it the 2627 that you and Andy are using? Is that better than the regular ratchet block (2138)?
 

andyatos

Well-Known Member
The one in the pic isn't a 2138 as LaLi mentioned above. The 2615 and 2627 look like that except the 2627 is an auto ratchet block. Is it the 2627 that you and Andy are using? Is that better than the regular ratchet block (2138)?
I started to call mine the 2138 because Lali kept referring to it that way. But yes, mine is in fact the 2627. Under low loads, the block free spools in both directions but when you load it up more, the ratchet kicks in. I believe Norcalsail also has the 2627 because I gave him one of mine to try.

The only other ratchet block I use is an old one on my Laser. It has a switch which allows for free spooling both directions which I use when the winds are really light. But the vast majority of the time I have the switch the other way with the ratchet on. So, if the 2138 has a switch so you can turn the ratchet on and off, then I don't see any big advantage having the 2627. It was always the function of the cam cleat being integrated with the block on my Sunfish that I was after.

Great job you guys picking up on the fine details! :)

- Andy
 
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BobMcT

Member
I ordered the Harken 2627 this morning. Glad I waited until I understood all the differences. The 2627 is the most expensive, but I like the "auto" feature and after reading the manuals, I saw that it is much easier to adjust cam cleat angle. It requires one screw to loosen and rotate. The 2138 requires removing 3 screws and replacing to adjust. The 2627 will be a lot easier to adjust while out sailing to get adjustment right. Thanks again for all the replies.
 

Fremont

Active Member
I have a Nautos ratchet block with cleat that I like.
Also, I mentioned in a post a while back about using a yoga block to protect the coaming from the spars when transporting. So here are photos of them both.

IMG_1925.jpegIMG_1926.jpeg
 

BobMcT

Member
Looks like a nice arrangement. My block came in and I should be able to configure it to where it will work without having to change any mounts or drill.

It’s getting a bit cold to do much sailing and getting into the water, but I’ll post results when I can get it set up and working.
 

BobMcT

Member
Have a question for Andy or someone very familiar with the 2627 block. I figured out how to get the angle adjusted like Andy's pic and reverse the cam. I noticed the block wheel freely turns in either direction. Is this normal. If there's a load on it, will it work like a regular ratchet block? Finally, it is a lot heavier with the cam and I assume that's why you added the additional larger spring. Should I do this before trying it out? I can get the springs at West Marine here.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
necessary to change the load adjustment on the block?
Probably not. However, one is tempted to think that on a Sunfish a lower engagement load would work better as the sheet makes a relatively shallow turn at the block. But as with everything else, it has to be tested. Personal preferences also vary.

_
 

andyatos

Well-Known Member
Finally, it is a lot heavier with the cam and I assume that's why you added the additional larger spring.
Actually, the reason I added a second spring was so that when I would apply downward force on the main sheet to cleat it in the cam cleat, the block would dip downward and towards the cockpit and not always cleat. Adding a second spring made the force holding the block upright "stiffer".
Should I do this before trying it out?
Yes, I would add the second spring before trying it out. Might as well.

Here's a series of photos of the process I used to tame the springs before and during installation.

Cheers,

- Andy
 
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BobMcT

Member
Andy, really appreciate the info and pics. When I installed the original spring I used tie-wraps which I could pull tight then clip after install. I was going to do the same with the two. I bought the large spring at West Marine yesterday. I'm not sure if I can find a way to keep large spring pulled toward the cockpit without drilling some mount. I guess I'll try first and see how it works. I wanted to avoid drilling any new mounting holes. I set up the block cam matching your pics mounted on your boat. I figured it was a good place to start. Did you ever adjust the ratchet tension?

The block came with a mounting plate to use if inverting the cam without the fairlead. It's black (mounts over the red flat part) and has recessed mounting for the screw heads.
 

andyatos

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure if I can find a way to keep large spring pulled toward the cockpit without drilling some mount. I guess I'll try first and see how it works. I wanted to avoid drilling any new mounting holes.
On either both Greg's and Phil's Sunfish or at least on one them we were able to keep the spring pulled towards the cockpit without drilling any new holes. Way back when I was first tinkering with my new block, I thought I would have to drill holes in the deck to keep the spring not only pulled towards the cockpit but down towards the deck as well. But it turned out that I didn't need to drill holes there. Line looping around the cockpit side of the spring then over the 90 edge and into the cockpit was enough to keep that spring where it needed to be.

Not too long ago I saw either video footage or photos of how we did that. I think it was on Greg's older boat that came with a hook on the forward side of the cockpit that he removed and we used those holes. Can't remember what we did with Phil's boat.

Maybe Phil can take a picture of his block and post it here so we can see what we did with the line that pulls the spring towards the cockpit.

Did you ever adjust the ratchet tension?

No, never did.

- Andy
 

BobMcT

Member
Andy, I can’t thank you enough for the input of your experience. I mounted the block in my shop today. I don’t think I need to worry about pulling the large spring toward the cockpit. The large spring from West Marine (a Harken) fits snuggly around the eye strap. It feels fairly secure especially with all the added weight of the cam block. If a secure tie is needed, it can be tied to eye strap below forward hiking strap attachment.

Water is a bit cold now so not sure when I’ll get a chance to try it out. I may risk it as long as I only get wet from thighs down.

I’m attaching a pic of the mounted block. I closely matched your cam position to use as starting point.


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norcalsail

Well-Known Member
Hate to say I haven't uncovered my Sunfish for a while; it's pretty well bundled up right now. My ratchet block looks very much like what you have here, BobMcT, angled down with a double spring.
 

andyatos

Well-Known Member
I mounted the block in my shop today. If a secure tie is needed, it can be tied to eye strap below forward hiking strap attachment.
Your block looks very nice. I'm glad to hear you've got the eye strap option to tie to. No new holes in that pristine deck of yours! :)

If the repeated action of cleating begins to inch the cockpit side of the spring away from the cockpit edge, you'll notice this with a feeling that the stiffness of the spring seems to be getting a bit softer and not providing as much rigidity to cleat against.

I hope you get to try it out in spite of the cold weather. And remember to bring a screw driver with you so you can play around with the angle of the cam during your sail. Will be interested to hear your feedback.

- Cheers,

- Andy
 

BobMcT

Member
Well, this morning I found a quick and easy way to secure the spring toward the cockpit using tie wraps to the eye strap under the hiking strap. Getting around and under the strap took a little more thinking. Regardless, it was easy and can easily be removed with no mods to boat.

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Don't worry, I fixed the crooked spring after seeing pic.
 

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BobMcT

Member
I got the boat out yesterday for a sail with the new block/cam arrangement. First off, I realized I had the cam adjusted too high making it too easy to cleat and hard to get out. I did take a screwdriver and stopped first chance and adjusted downward. It may be a hair low now, but I can get in cam from different seating positions and it's very easy to un-cleat. I think I'll leave it there before trying a hair back up until I'm really comfortable with it.

My initial impression is the boat is FAR more enjoyable to sail without always having to hold the sheet. One other thing I noticed is that this Harken block doesn't hold the line and ratchet near as well as the Nautos one that came with the boat. I tried changing the resistance adjustment and have it fully counterclockwise to give it the most hold. Fully clockwise there was no noticeable ratchet effect. This was a surprise but having the cam more than makes up for the difference as I don't have to hold the tension and it's very easy to release. Finally, the double spring arrangement works fine and the newer boats have the forward boom block in the perfect position going into the mounted ratchet block.

I hope to get more practice in before the water gets too cold. I did order a shorty wet suit so on nice days I can enjoy sailing even with cold water..
 

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