Question on year of AMF Sunfish

sailcraftri

Well-Known Member
#21
Non anodized mast should not be an issue. Long ago all masts were that way until they had places that could anodize such long tubes. I replaced a mast on my O'Day 23 using non anodized to save $300. I just kept it waxed every year and it was fine. Non anodized will just oxidize faster unless treated as I did.

End caps won't fit with the thicker wall but you could try measuring the current end caps and see if you have enough material to shave them down. Extra thickness will be heavier and as such would affect your righting moment, but your weight low on deck probably will mean you won't see a significant difference.

That being said I would look around for used masts or new ones. I have new old stock masts in Rhode Island, bt shipping is difficult. You could go to www.uship.com ans see if anyone is willing to bring it to you because they are making the trip anyway.
 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#22
In fresh water, anodizing gets worn away at the gooseneck and at each sail clip, resulting in black marks where it is worn away. I think your whole boom will end up blackened pretty quickly without anodization. I'd buy a real boom.

Also, painting the deck and getting a finish equivalent to what you have now will be hard. I don't know that anything needs to be done with the halyard block area, and even if you do repari it, a spot patch with orange will probably end up looking better than if you paint the whole deck. That boats looks to be in pretty darn nice shape for a '73.

If you want to minimize any further halyard block damage, put a halyard cleat on your mast. Then just run the tail loosely thru the deck block and cleat it. There will be minimal upward force on the block. Just be sure you do run the halyard to the deck cleat, or if you flip the rig will fall out.
 
Thread starter #23
I went to the local West Marine to get some glass repair materials ( I am going to do a small surface repair at the halyard block, the deck peaks about 1/8" close to the crack). As fate would have it, the chap at the register lives close to me and has a barn full of spare parts for all sorts of boats, including Sunfish spars, think I found a used one close to home.
 
Thread starter #24
Update on progress and a question. Finally got around to buying a proper upper boom, and have ground the high spot at the crack down flat for wetting in some fresh cloth and resin. Cut a hole for inspection port near bow to remove rotted backing block for bow handle and add a replacement made of cypress.

I am going to paint the top deck, wondering about removing the aluminum rub rail first. I notice that the original rivets don't go all the way through, any problem replacing them with ones that do? Also, will a modern replacement bailer fit on a "73 hull?
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#25
Hola
You can buy rivets that don't go all the way through, I recommend aluminum, available at your local hardware store. They should be 1/8 inch diameter and set no more than 1/4 inch deep. The reason they don't go through is to prevent sharp edges on the bottom part of the trim. If you decide to use deeper rivets, make sure you file away any sharp edges of the trim and new rivet.

Yes modern bailer will fit

Cheers
Kent
 
Thread starter #26
Thank Kent. I guess drilling out the existing rivets is the fun part, eh? I suppose the hole goes all the way through the glass flange, since the rivet has to spread out on the backside in order to hold.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#27
Thank Kent. I guess drilling out the existing rivets is the fun part, eh? I suppose the hole goes all the way through the glass flange, since the rivet has to spread out on the backside in order to hold.
That is a quick and easy job. Yes the hole goes through the flange, but not the bottom part of the trim. Use a 1/8 inch bit to drill out the center of the rivet and be careful not to go all the way through.

Be careful removing the trim, it is easy for it to bend around the rivet holes and shear into two pieces. If it does, you can reinstall it, put a rivet in the old hole then 2 new rivets on either side of the original hole.


 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#28
Will the end caps fit with the extra wall thickness? Will extra weight be a factor in boat handling?
"Weight aloft" is to be avoided.

My guess is that the "wall-thickness" relates to the inside diameter. I'll agree with the above posts that a Craigslist search is the best thing you can do. The Sunfish design was a "bendy" rig; meaning, you'd be losing speed with thicker spar walls.
 
Thread starter #29
After a loooong hiatus, I'm back to tinkering on my fish. Flipped her over to get my first real look at the bottom. There are some cracks at the front and rear of the daggerboard slot (guessing a previous owner ran her hard aground at flank speed), I gouged them out with a small chisel. Now wondering if I need to do a grind and glass layup, or tempt fate with a Marine Tex patch. I pressed with the heel of my hand to test for movement, none detected. What say the sages? IMG_20150928_141824.jpg
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#30
"...Now wondering if I need to do a grind and glass layup, or tempt fate with a Marine Tex patch. I pressed with the heel of my hand to test for movement, none detected..."
My three 70's Sunfishes each have that damage which, with a heavyweight on board, doesn't take a particularly hard hit to make. :(

Marine Tex isn't cheap. As the damage has undergone some "discovering" already, I'd substitute the two-part Marine Tex purchase into a two-part West® epoxy repair. Mix by volume, and you don't have to buy their expensive pumps. :rolleyes: After long use, they pump bubbles into the mix anyway, which confuses the ratio. :confused: I use their "slow-set" catalyst for extended time and ease in setting up the repair, and check on my work in the morning.

A professional's steps can be found on this site, using the Search function for "biaxial". ("Search" is a little dim box in the upper right).
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#32
Hola...You can buy rivets that don't go all the way through, I recommend aluminum, available at your local hardware store. They should be 1/8 inch diameter and set no more than 1/4 inch deep. The reason they don't go through is to prevent sharp edges on the bottom part of the trim. If you decide to use deeper rivets, make sure you file away any sharp edges of the trim and new rivet...Yes modern bailer will fit...Cheers...Kent
Stores always seem to be out of 1/8" (length) pop rivets. :confused: The tops of rivets can also be "sharp". Take a small socket to tap the edges (only) down flat.
P8210017.JPG

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