Precision P13... I know... It's not a Laser... but...

Thread starter #21
Any advice on how to better secure the bow to the trailer for transport? The bow eye fairlead has one screw completely stripped (spins freely), and the other is probably close. While the interwebs say that the hull weighs only 140 lbs, I cringe at the thought of the boat breaking loose on the way to the ramp.
 

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Thread starter #22
Excellent advice here suggested adding some purchase to the lines. So I added a micro-block to get a 3:1 outhaul, and corrected the cunningham rigging to the standard setup. It wouldn't be too difficult to go from 3:1 to 4:1 on the vang, but not sure if that'd make a real difference? I still need to add the advised Dyneema clew tie-down.

I finally found time to get this boat on the water for a few hours with the 'new-to-me' Laser sail. It seems to fit exactly like the original sail. But the sailcloth feels a bit thicker, and it's a lot more 'crispy' than a 30 year-old sail.

Winds were forecasted 7 knots with gusts to 16. I stayed within a large cove at my local lake with plenty of kayakers nearby and some motorboats anchored for swimming. Since I'm new to this boat, I wanted people around, just in case I got in trouble.

There were a few of times when I could see a gust approaching. With that advance notice, everything lined up perfectly, and the boat just took off. I found myself flying across the water until I ran out of lake. What a rush!

This was only my third time out on this boat. So it is hard to tell if it's the learning curve, luck, or the new sail that made it so fun.

One thing I learned -- I need to practice recovering from capsize and get more confident in that before I can really start testing the boat's limits. Fear of capsize kept me pointing into the wind and/or letting out the sheet when I felt like I may be in danger of going over.
 
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LaLi

Well-Known Member
#23
I wouldn't put the boat in the water without tying the clew down. It's as fundamental as having the battens in place (or more so).

For non-racing purposes the outhaul is really a "set-and-forget" adjustment, which you probably wouldn't have needed to upgrade.

Whatever you mean with a "standard" cunningham (a 6:1 is the most common in the Laser), it's good enough if you can pull out all horizontal wrinkles with it.

The vang is the most important adjustment, and the more purchase it has, the easier it is to use. There are countless inexpensive ways to upgrade it, and you're not even limited to any rules as yours isn't a class boat! But if you go with the current fittings, at least get a swivel between the cleat block and the mast - it's a huge improvement in adjustability.

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