New to Lasers

Thread starter #1
Hi all. After buying a Laser 3 months ago I did my first open on Sunday. Due to bad weather and it clashing with another big Laser event there were only 7 of us. However this didn't stop me having a brilliant time, I've only really done handicap racing before and this fleet racing is a completely different game. I was pleased with my progress through the day, race 1 straight to the back of the fleet and stayed there, race 2 mid fleet most of the race then done over on the last few marks and race 3 was the high point. Good start for a change then flew up the beat to lead round the windward mark. This left me with a novel problem I hadn't experienced before, no boat in front to show me were the next mark is! Time to make a guess then, watch the fleet behind head off in another direction. Just about get to the next mark in front then repeat the whole procedure and end up near the back. Oh well great day anyway with quite a few lessons learned.
 

Merrily

Administrator
#2
Hey, sounds just like the regatta I put on this past Saturday, but the only out of towner didn't speak with an English accent!

Welcome to Laser racing!
 
Thread starter #4
Wigan Sailing club. The event was listed on northernLaser.co.uk It turned out to be real quiet but it was just what I needed for my first one. I didnt really fancy 40 olympic hopefuls shouting at me on the line
 
#5
Wigan have a pretty decent set up, I did the NW Enterprise Regionals there last year.
I have been sailing Lasers for about a year or so now (properly) and will probably start doing Laser Opens next year. Hope to see you around.

Jack
 
#6
Keep in mind that you might be rounding first so it is important to know your course and where the next mark should be, sometimes its hard to see the leeward marks depending on conditions, The courses are pretty easy to remember so it will definitely help if you know them.
 
#7
The courses are pretty easy to remember so it will definitely help if you know them.
That is quite a general statement. I find some courses OK to remember, other are quite horrendous. At a recent Open Meeting/Regatta (non-Laser) I did we had over 6 different marks to round (no spacer marks in that) in fairly irregular pattern with no gybes and no runs. Different clubs set different courses of different complexities.

Sometimes clubs will name their marks rather than number them. When marks are numbered (e.g. one in front of the club house then counting in a clockwise direction) things are easier but when the course might be e.g. Branston, Wisk, Toppings, Snowdrop, Deep End, ... (and I did one event last year where we had 12 named marks in a single lap - though several people "had words" and subsequent races were more straightforward !), well it stretches my memory capabilities.

Sometimes navigation marks are used and you might remember its starboard channel mark No 5 but when there is a line of ... No 3, No 5, No 7, etc. knowing it's number might not always mean you know which mark it actually is on the water from a distance.

Or maybe I am just too old and my brain has slowed too much.

Ian
 
#8
I agree with diemos, our local club hasnt got numbers or anything, you need to know before you go on the water or have the course card out with you
 
#9
That is quite a general statement. I find some courses OK to remember, other are quite horrendous. At a recent Open Meeting/Regatta (non-Laser) I did we had over 6 different marks to round (no spacer marks in that) in fairly irregular pattern with no gybes and no runs. Different clubs set different courses of different complexities.

Sometimes clubs will name their marks rather than number them. When marks are numbered (e.g. one in front of the club house then counting in a clockwise direction) things are easier but when the course might be e.g. Branston, Wisk, Toppings, Snowdrop, Deep End, ... (and I did one event last year where we had 12 named marks in a single lap - though several people "had words" and subsequent races were more straightforward !), well it stretches my memory capabilities.

Sometimes navigation marks are used and you might remember its starboard channel mark No 5 but when there is a line of ... No 3, No 5, No 7, etc. knowing it's number might not always mean you know which mark it actually is on the water from a distance.

Or maybe I am just too old and my brain has slowed too much.

Ian
if you're doing odd courses around numbered cans which are named then it will be much harder to remember, that is what most of the PHRF racing is like, you have to know which letter corresponds to which mark and there are often 11 channel markers and special marks as well. I can't imagine having 12 named marks in a single race, The places I race use their own marks, courses W, T and H x1 or x2 and sometimes WT ect.
 
#10
Paul, if you are looking for a winter location. Try Crosby SC just north of Liverpool Docks. Small friendly club on 24 hectare sea water fed lake. Autumn series end of Oct to Xmas, then Frostbite Jan - early April. To add spice, there will be pursuit racing last sunday of each month.
Well worth a look as the lake won't freeze if the weather is like last year !
 
Thread starter #11
Cheers. I sail at Southport SC at the moment and they have a long running frostbite (November to March) Although unusually for a sailing club they dont have many Laseras at all. Ive had a quick look at Crosby's website and it looks tempting, quite a few Lasers and relatively near, I think i'll have a ride up on a Sunday. Thanks again
 
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