New Sunfish

norcalsail

Active Member
Thread starter #1
So I was able to get some pictures of the new Sunfish. I rigged it up and it can sail. Some problems with the boom-seems bent and the sail doesn't sit tight at the bottom. May require fixing. I'll see..Cat has to be involved in everything... 20180808_172712.jpg 20180808_172712.jpg 20180808_172712.jpg
 

norcalsail

Active Member
Thread starter #4
I'm not so good at posting pictures but this is the new boat. I rigged it today and it can sail. Not so good at rigging either but trial and error will get me there.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#5
Beautiful boat! The boom looks okay from the angles I see. And the sail is supposed to be pooled like that, it has extra draft cut into the foot, you will be pleased with how it sets out in a breeze. The older sails you are used to are pretty flat. The bottom edge (foot) is curved, not straight and there is some broadseaming to give the sail camber, like a wing. Keep the outhauls tight for heavier wind days and loose for light wind days. After a few sails you might adjust them a bit to suit you.

Here is a new Laser Performance Mai Tai sail we bought early this year, we were surprised when it showed up with an LP sticker on it vs North Sails.

IMG_6449 2.jpg

You boom is going to bend a bit, nature of the design.

IMG_6463 3.jpg

Tacking through the wind, boom straight, foot of sail puddled on the boom.

IMG_6467.jpg

Well none of the above matters because the Queen Kitty approves! Does the boat have a name yet?

And thank you for sharing pictures, first new boat we've seen in a long time.

Cheers
Kent and Skipper
 
#7
Very nice! To add to what Kent said, if you look at the middle of the three pictures he posted, you’ll see the boom bends when you sheet in. The curve in the bottom of the sail is designed to roughly match the curve in the boom sheeted it. As Kent said, Sunfish sails over the past 20 years or so are cut to “pool” as the bottom.

The top spar should be tied so the outhaul is snug.

I’d start with the outhaul tied so the sail comes to about 4 inches from the end of the boom. As Kent says, if it gets really windy you can tighten it to flatten the sail. Racers have the outhauls set up to be adjustable “on the fly” but that isn’t needed for recreational sailing.
 

norcalsail

Active Member
Thread starter #11
Beautiful boat! The boom looks okay from the angles I see. And the sail is supposed to be pooled like that, it has extra draft cut into the foot, you will be pleased with how it sets out in a breeze. The older sails you are used to are pretty flat. The bottom edge (foot) is curved, not straight and there is some broadseaming to give the sail camber, like a wing. Keep the outhauls tight for heavier wind days and loose for light wind days. After a few sails you might adjust them a bit to suit you.

Here is a new Laser Performance Mai Tai sail we bought early this year, we were surprised when it showed up with an LP sticker on it vs North Sails.
View attachment 27507

You boom is going to bend a bit, nature of the design.

View attachment 27508

Tacking through the wind, boom straight, foot of sail puddled on the boom.

View attachment 27509

Well none of the above matters because the Queen Kitty approves! Does the boat have a name yet?

And thank you for sharing pictures, first new boat we've seen in a long time.

Cheers
Kent and Skipper
Thank you Kent and Skipper for your advice about this. I was a little concerned something was not right but not so much now and can see what you're talking about. That Mai Tai sail looks really good by the way. I have been reading a lot about sailing and Sunfish boats and forgot about the Bernoulli effect that occurs with the physics of sailing. The sail needs that camber. Love these pictures and appreciate your knowledge! Phil
 

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
#12
Awwww... look at the kitteh!!! A true mariner's cat, LOL. Sharp-looking boat, my friend, colors look nice and your family on shore should be able to easily single you out in marine traffic, should there be any traffic. I wouldn't wrap that halyard round the gooseneck, no need to risk fouling it or impeding the rotation of the gooseneck in any manner... just my $.02, FWIW. Beautiful boat, man, you're gonna have some fun aboard that little megayacht, LOL. ENJOY!!! AND DON'T FORGET TO TAKE PICS, GET YOURSELF AN INEXPENSIVE CAMERA AND USE A ZIP-LOC BAG FOR PROTECTION... DON'T DROP THE CAMERA OVERBOARD!!! :eek:

P.S. You can buy a small waterproof case to store camera, car keys, a copy of your vessel registration, etc., several manufacturers offer such cases. Clip it somewhere out of the way, but where you can reach the camera when you don't have your hands full sailing the boat. Another option is to sling the camera round your neck or over your shoulder on a dummy cord or strip of webbing... one of those waterproof disposable "sport cameras." Some guys just hide their keys on their vehicles, up under the wheel well or inside the bumper. :rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#14
I agree it isn’t needed for rec sailing. This video also shows vang rigging
so if you are going to rig it, watch the video.

NorCal I can’t see the image that you took that well, but it looks to me like you will pull your deck cleat out of the deck downwind on port, so pls check how you have rigged it.
 

Ghost Rider

Planing into eternity...
#15
wrapping the halyard up and over the gooseneck is used for vang tension - but it's not really that necessary for recreational sailing.
there are some tips on rigging setups at Starboard Passage (he does talk some about the boom vang there): Sunfish | Starboard Passage
Roger that, I never bothered with it aboard my Minifish, I'm an adherent of the K.I.S.S. principle: "Keep It Simple, Stooooopid!!!" LOL. :confused:
 

norcalsail

Active Member
Thread starter #16
I'm so jealous of that brand new boat - it's beautiful! great color combination, too.
Thanks Tag, The color combo really works-I wanted the bow to stern stripe but this works well. Hard to believe it's sittin on my back deck!
Very nice! To add to what Kent said, if you look at the middle of the three pictures he posted, you’ll see the boom bends when you sheet in. The curve in the bottom of the sail is designed to roughly match the curve in the boom sheeted it. As Kent said, Sunfish sails over the past 20 years or so are cut to “pool” as the bottom.

The top spar should be tied so the outhaul is snug.

I’d start with the outhaul tied so the sail comes to about 4 inches from the end of the boom. As Kent says, if it gets really windy you can tighten it to flatten the sail. Racers have the outhauls set up to be adjustable “on the fly” but that isn’t needed for recreational sailing.
Thank you for this info- I may have some adjustment to do. Little by little; I have learned a lot on this forum and you tube!
 

norcalsail

Active Member
Thread starter #17
Awwww... look at the kitteh!!! A true mariner's cat, LOL. Sharp-looking boat, my friend, colors look nice and your family on shore should be able to easily single you out in marine traffic, should there be any traffic. I wouldn't wrap that halyard round the gooseneck, no need to risk fouling it or impeding the rotation of the gooseneck in any manner... just my $.02, FWIW. Beautiful boat, man, you're gonna have some fun aboard that little megayacht, LOL. ENJOY!!! AND DON'T FORGET TO TAKE PICS, GET YOURSELF AN INEXPENSIVE CAMERA AND USE A ZIP-LOC BAG FOR PROTECTION... DON'T DROP THE CAMERA OVERBOARD!!! :eek:

P.S. You can buy a small waterproof case to store camera, car keys, a copy of your vessel registration, etc., several manufacturers offer such cases. Clip it somewhere out of the way, but where you can reach the camera when you don't have your hands full sailing the boat. Another option is to sling the camera round your neck or over your shoulder on a dummy cord or strip of webbing... one of those waterproof disposable "sport cameras." Some guys just hide their keys on their vehicles, up under the wheel well or inside the bumper. :rolleyes:
Thanks Ghost Rider , Furboy likes to hang out when anything new comes around. A very funny Kitta! I tied the halyard sort of as I saw it on a you tube vid but never did this on the old Sunfish. Something I realized was that the curved bottom of the daggerboard points to the stern. I been doing it wrong all these years but never had anyone to tell me differently-I thought the curve faced forward, seemed to make sense. Lots of great folks on this forum to help me with my knowledge about these things.
 

norcalsail

Active Member
Thread starter #18
wrapping the halyard up and over the gooseneck is used for vang tension - but it's not really that necessary for recreational sailing.
there are some tips on rigging setups at Starboard Passage (he does talk some about the boom vang there): Sunfish | Starboard Passage
Thanks Tag, I had seen this on you tube so tied it like that in the moment. I've been wondering how much difference such things make for rec sailing. Can't wait to get this thing on the water!
 

norcalsail

Active Member
Thread starter #19
I agree it isn’t needed for rec sailing. This video also shows vang rigging
so if you are going to rig it, watch the video.

NorCal I can’t see the image that you took that well, but it looks to me like you will pull your deck cleat out of the deck downwind on port, so pls check how you have rigged it.
Thank you Beldar, I will simplify that and review some rigging vids. Very happy to be able to get feedback here! Otherwise I'm flyin solo...
 
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