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New style hull, The curved part at the point of the bow, how is that repaired?

shorefun

Member
On the new style hulls with the curved edge seam.

The very front part I have noticed a portion of the curved area is broken off. Not past the bond, but missing no the less. Almost looks like a belt sander was taken to the front.

So how would that area be repaired. Seems like a real night mare to fix. Technically it is 2 pieces. You would have to grind both at the top which is easy and the inside curve on the bottom if you are going to do it in two parts.

The other option is to grind away at the top and make it one piece.

No sure I am going to tackle this repair on the 1996 Sunfish I have as it is more sort of cosmetic.

This boat just needs a small area in the bow (1/2 hole mid way down at the point) repaired and a 1/2" puncture hole on the deck. I also need to do an air test as someone tried to seal every thing up with silicon caulk. It looks ugly. I have a feeling there is a crack somewhere like in the dagger board seam.

This boat was used a lot at the beach. It has a lot of wear on the parts. The mast and boom were bent and I have to patch 2 holes in the sail.
 

shorefun

Member
So here are some pictures. On part of the options I have would be to use some body filler to make a mold from my 2006.
One of my thoughts is that there are 2 layers that come together here. Would I need to build it in 2 layers. Make up the hull portion then put in a removable spacer and build the deck side. The put in some Thixo epoxy between them.
I am considering my levels of work as I have a bunch of glass projects on other Sunfish. The other fish need work to seal the hull and this fix is more cosmetic at this point.
I am curious of ideas for repair.
thanks.
 

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L&VW

Well-Known Member
If a cosmetic repair is what you have in mind, I'd:

1) sand/grind to clean original fiberglass,

2) clamp a section of old garden hose to fit inside the curve, and

3) build up layers just "proud" of the desired look, remove the hose and

4) sand off the excess—paint to match...

Fridays are always slow forum days...someone should have better ideas... ;)
 

mixmkr

Well-Known Member
Just repair it like a hole...faired edges to receive new fiberglass, etc...but one side isn't attached to anything. Get creative like Wind said with the hose..or whatever you might need for a form. Cardboard works too...whatever works. After a couple layers of glass, use some filler if you want to final shape, but the more glass the better and less likely to chip on next impact.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Just repair it like a hole...faired edges to receive new fiberglass, etc...but one side isn't attached to anything. Get creative like Wind said with the hose..or whatever you might need for a form. Cardboard works too...whatever works. After a couple layers of glass, use some filler if you want to final shape, but the more glass the better and less likely to chip on next impact.
Hey, it's "Mr. Wind" to you!
;)

Surface preparation for this repair is "made-for" that $9 Harbor Freight grinder. :)

(You'll need a grinding disk, as it arrives with none).
 

shorefun

Member
"Surface preparation for this repair is "made-for" that $9 Harbor Freight grinder "

So I shouldn't use by Makita 4" grinder with the 80 grit flapper disk?
I also have a Harbor Freight 4 1/2" grinder cause I needed that spindle for a type of paint remover.
My Makita has got some hours on it from working a couple of car restorations. I have an interesting assortment of tools on hand.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Yes, a flapper would take less material off--it would be gentler. :)

I don't have a flapper, so I make up for the grinder's high loss of material by adding even more epoxy! ;)
 

mixmkr

Well-Known Member
Youll use those grinders for all of about 10 seconds....in the beginning. After that, I'd scale back to something in the chainsaw dept. :)
 
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