New style daggerboard repair

Thread starter #1
So I hit a rock or something in August, and damaged my new daggerboard, and over the winter seems like a great time to fix it. This forum seems to have great advice for stuff like this, but there's nothing in the FAQ for this, and searching "daggerboard repair" didn't seem to get what I'm after. I'll be able to get a photo of it this weekend...but it has a craggy chunk of the white outer layer taken out of the leading edge, near the tip. What's the best way to fix it? Thanks in advance!
 
#3
Photos would help. Is this the white board with the cut-out handle or the newer infused board without the cut-out handle? Depending on the size of the "ding", there are several ways to fix it.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY
 
Thread starter #6
Here are the photos. The defect is really only on the port side of the board. Do the photos change any of the recommendations? Thanks again.
 
Thread starter #8
Clean up the damaged area with a Dremel tool, glob on MarineTex and then sand to shape. This should be an easy repair.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY
Just to make sure I understand,...the point of the cleaning up with a Dremel is to remove any bits that are loose, or otherwise have compromised strength, right? Because I'm thinking that it would be better not to smooth everything down, because wouldn't a rough and jagged edge be a better bonding surface for an epoxy or filler? (This is the noob in me coming out here...I'm probably quibbling over relatively insignificant details, right?)
 

mixmkr

Active Member
#9
Sanding with 220 grit gives you more than enough grip. Grinding with the dremel will be much coarser. Yes...grind away shattered or loose material first. Then "glob" away. :)
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#10
Just to make sure I understand,...the point of the cleaning up with a Dremel is to remove any bits that are loose, or otherwise have compromised strength, right? Because I'm thinking that it would be better not to smooth everything down, because wouldn't a rough and jagged edge be a better bonding surface for an epoxy or filler? (This is the noob in me coming out here...I'm probably quibbling over relatively insignificant details, right?)
'Just came from a site where a member is asking about carrying a bunch of steel chairs to a professional sandblasting outfit. :confused:

I've used my own $20 siphon sandblaster—and regular-old beach sand—in the restoration of rusted auto parts. 'Seems sandblasting would make an ideal gripping surface in fiberglass work. Anyone tried it?

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