What's new

Never sailed before, bought a albacore 16. Need mast footing/mast step repairs?

never_sailed

New Member
Very excited to get started on a day with light wind, I've never sailed before but I've always wanted to! The boat was a great deal, brand new sails, some nice changes to the rigging, and a good price. I noticed a crack below the mast attachment point on the hull. I thought this would probably be fixable, I'd rather fix it before I take it out. What do you guys think? I'd be really grateful for any advice
Capture.PNG 118097560_345322476623423_633628893120172121_n.jpg118083305_741165790071365_702018548302236582_n.jpg
 
Last edited:

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
I almost bought an Albacore 15 when I was in the PNW, they're nice little boats. What is that, some sort of foam cr@p, foam mat or spray on the cockpit floor? It doesn't look like the bulkhead just forward of the step, that's why I ask. Maybe it's some product designed for traction or nonskid purposes, but it reminds me of carpet foam, LOL. Can you check to see if there's solid glass beneath that layer? Is it soft or spongy, that cr@p in the photos? The Albacore 15 I saw up north didn't have that stuff in the cockpit, maybe someone added or sprayed that stuff at some point in the boat's history. :confused:
 

never_sailed

New Member
Thanks! Yeah I see what you mean, I'm not sure. That stuff is totally hard, but I guess if it was a product added later then a crack in it might mean nothing at all if it doesn't go into the fiberglass. I'll dig into it a bit with a screw driver this afternoon and see if that's all that is going on. It kinda covers the whole cockpit, here's a picture standing back a little.
 

Attachments

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
I only say that because I don't remember seeing that cr@p in the Albacore I checked out up in the PNW... and it doesn't look like professional factory work either, though that might be due to age. Perhaps it's added flotation, but I would suggest carefully inspecting it, gently probing one of those cracks with a butter knife to see if you run up on hard glass below (which you should). The cracks seen in your photo probably aren't structural, so you may simply be able to fill 'em and carry on with your sailing agenda. I'm sure someone else will chime in on that stuff, now that I think about it I do recall seeing some boat long ago with similar material, but it was gray with black flecks or whatever. Still, I would fill those cracks after you make sure there's no damage to the underlying glass, just to keep water out and prevent mold, mildew, rot, etc. :confused:

P.S. Just wanna add that these are nice little boats, fast under an experienced skipper... roomy enough to take friends with you, small enough to singlehand or solo once you get the hang of her. I looked into 'em pretty hard while that one was available in the PNW, almost bought her but I was still in transition with all my stuff in storage... I was living in a cheap rental flat by that time, and was too busy searching for a home to commit to the boat purchase. Nothin' wrong with the Albacore 15, it has a solid reputation in certain circles, LOL... :rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

never_sailed

New Member
Okay totally! Yeah I'll be careful, that's some very encouraging feedback though. I was prepared to do some work on it but if it ends up to be that simple I'll be chuffed!
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Looking at that last pic you posted, maybe it WAS factory work and it's just showing its age... hard to tell, since the area where it meets that forward bulkhead looks so cr@ppy. Might just be a minor cosmetic issue, which means good news for you, but inspect it anyway, aye? I see at least one inspection port in that port-side cockpit bench, might as well open that up and take a look inside... same for any other inspection ports. What's that down where the centerboard trunk meets the cockpit floor, just dirt? Or is it some damage? Again, hard to tell without a closer look. Overall, I think you scored, since any problems you find can be fixed... check the lights & rubber on that trailer too, old tires which have tread are still cr@ppy old tires, and of course you want your lights to work properly so you don't get a ticket from Johnny Law. :confused:

Edit: I'm also wondering why the PO put those tracks on the cockpit benches, where they do NOT belong... that doesn't make any sense, unless that person had some sort of disability and rigged the boat differently for that reason. Maybe they put 'em there for a chute, but that wouldn't be my choice of location. Moi, I'd be changing things around, you might wanna look farther into how the Albacore 15 should be rigged, I'm sure you can find photos & info on the web. :rolleyes:

Edit #2: Okay, I quickly scanned a video on rigging the Albacore and it DID show those tracks installed on the cockpit benches... didn't get far enough into the video to find out why, I'm assuming for a spinnaker, but you can watch the videos and figure it out. Seems like an unusual location, but maybe that's just the way things are, and if you don't plan on flying a spinnaker you can always remove them, saving them for later if you change your mind. ;)

Oh, yeah, the boat in the video did NOT have that funky coating or whatever on the cockpit floor... :cool:
 
Last edited:

never_sailed

New Member
Oh, yeah there is just a bit of dirt in there. I don't think it's been used for some time.

I probably need to replace some of the wires and stuff before going out on a windy day, but having never sailed.. I'm going to choose a calm day first. The cables that hoist the mainsail and jib connect up with a rope, and it kind of gets stuck near the top when the joint between the two goes over a wheel.. curable with a yank. The seller told me I can use a nylon chord to replace the wire/rope system so I think that's something to try out in the next few months. If you're right about this step then it will just be cosmetic issues and that's great :) thanks again for the advice!

The trailer actually does need some work, the lights are broken but the tires are totally new! Needs a lick of paint as well.
 

never_sailed

New Member
Re: your edits. I don't about rigging at all, having never sailed! But the seller did tell me he made the changes based on forum conversation in the Toronto Yacht Club forum. I guess these boats are common and popular in Ontario.. Supposed to make the rigging easier or something I think. I don't know really! I'll give it a go and change it if it seems awkward. He added the inspection ports there as well. The wheels have a nice ratcheting action though, which seemed pretty cool
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
I just said that because trailers often sit for long periods, and even though the tires still have tread, they are cr@ppy and old, and the last thing you want is a blowout on the way to your launch site. If the lights & wiring are totally shot, you can always buy one of those light racks the towing outfits use, they don't cost that much and they'll get ya legal. Until then, use a red or orange flag for safety. :confused:

Hey, good news is that there are plenty of web videos on rigging the Albacore 15, I just quickly hit the first one to see if I could spot those tracks on the cockpit benches, LOL. I don't even remember seeing those aboard the PNW Albacore, maybe the owner/seller removed them, as I probably would, since comfortable seating is important to me and whatever passengers I might have. Relocate 'em anyway... meh, maybe some Albacore racers will chime in here. :rolleyes:
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Before I get cleaned up and run into town, I'd like to add that you should check out some basic sailing books or videos before taking this boat out... like the Lido 14, this Albacore is handy, but she can become a handful for someone who has never sailed. I only say this so you don't wind up capsizing or otherwise having a bad time on the water. Most libraries still have books on basic sailing, and of course there must be a $h!tload of material on the web. I'd hate for you to have a bad time on your first voyage, especially since these little boats are designed to fly and have fun... your boat will be fast for a monohull, and very handy during maneuvers, but you should first grasp what needs to be done during those maneuvers, and not just blindly try to figure it all out. :confused:

Most site members here would probably recommend courses of instruction, but at the very least please check out some books or videos... they can be specific to the Albacore, or to similar craft which carry main & jib. You certainly won't be using a spinnaker on your first voyage, that's a whole 'nother level of instruction which should be undertaken with help from those who know the routine. But you CAN grasp the basics of sailing and maneuvering by checking out some books and/or videos, paying particular attention to diagrams and sequences in tacking & gybing. Another reason why I say all of this, you have what appears to be a very nice little boat, just a few minor problems to sort out, and you do NOT want to damage the boat due to mishaps or bad handling on the water. :eek:

I AM NOT TRYING TO BE CONDESCENDING HERE, THIS IS A MARINE SAFETY ISSUE... AND MARINE SAFETY SHOULD ALWAYS BE YOUR TOP PRIORITY. :rolleyes:

AFTER THAT, WELL, HAVING FUN RATES PRETTY HIGHLY WITH ME, LOL... GOOD LUCK, AND PLEASE JUST CHECK OUT SOME BASIC SAILING BOOKS OR VIDEOS, AS WELL AS SPECIFIC RIGGING VIDEOS FOR THE ALBACORE 15. CHEERS!!! :cool:

EDIT: DON'T FORGET TO READ UP ON 'RULES OF THE ROAD'---KNOWING THOSE WILL ALSO HELP TO KEEP YOU OUTTA TROUBLE, AYE? ;)
 
Last edited:

never_sailed

New Member
Thanks, sorry I didn't get right back.. :) I might try it without the jib the first time I go out, unless I'm with someone that knows sailing. I'm going to be really careful with it the first time and definitely watch some videos for how to right it. I've gone through a few already, I'm perhaps a bit behind in the vocabulary, but definitely will watch a few more hours of them before I go out. I have a friend who has a much larger sail boat with a cabin who will go out with me the first time, hopefully. I think that will be next week. Don't worry, I'm actually pretty anxious about it! It's the first big leisure thing I've really ever bought since graduating university, and I've seen in the videos that it's easy to take a chip out of the centreboard or approach the dock with too much speed. The hull is really light. I'll just do some work on it over the weekend.. paint that trailer.. fix the lights. I'm waiting for a tow hitch anyway
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
I'm back from running errands, and this cold beer tastes pretty darned good... I'm glad to read your latest reply, better safe than sorry when you're first learning to sail. One violent flying gybe can dismast such a boat, then you have more damage to deal with later, aye? You want maneuvers to be smooth & controlled, it makes sailing easier (and funner too). Oh, and don't be sorry, we're here to help... some of us know a little about boat work, having done a bit in the past. ;)

I for one would prefer to see a later post wherein you rave about having a great time on the water... instead of ranting about a capsize, collision at sea, pending lawsuit, etc., etc. That's why it's so important to know the 'Rules of the Road' and abide by them, and NEVER assume that the other skipper knows them also, as that can lead to trouble. You'll learn more as you go along, and the more you know, the better off you'll be in every possible way. :rolleyes:

Don't sweat the lingo yet, there's much to learn in that respect... try to pick up the basic terms first, and also focus on learning how to safely maneuver. Learn points of sail, the relative bearing of other craft on the water, correct sequences of maneuvering, things of that nature to keep yourself out of trouble... finer points can be picked up later, no worries. Check weather forecast & tide chart (if applicable), those are important too. Enough said for now, you're on the right track. :D

I'M OFF TO MAKE TROUBLE ELSEWHERE, NOW THAT I HAVE A COLD ONE IN MY HAND, LOL... DUTCH COURAGE!!! DON'T EVER DISCOUNT THE DUTCH, THEY HAIL FROM A SEAFARING NATION WITH A GREAT NAUTICAL HISTORY. CHEERS!!! :cool:
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Took a break from reading a hilarious Western to check out a few Albacore videos, and the boat was rigged differently in each video. Some sailors had complex rigging set up for racing, others had more simplified versions... which is what you want when you're first learning to sail. You can always make changes later. I'm posting this video because it shows a simple way of rigging the boat without a whole heap of confusion for the novice... note that those tracks I mentioned earlier are NOT present. :confused:

Anyway, you can see how nimble and quick the Albacore is when this skipper here trims his sails and positions himself correctly, it's definitely a fast little boat. I think you should choose your videos wisely to avoid feeling overwhelmed or confused at the outset... some of those rigging videos struck me as being very complicated for a beginner. Just remember, since you now own the boat, YOU decide how you want to rig her... again, you can add more complex rigging once you learn how to safely handle the boat. :rolleyes:

Here's my $.02 on learning to sail: controls should be simple, not complicated, so you're not dealing with a $h!t ton of variables under way as you pick up the basics. Some of these guys have so many lines going every which way in their videos, anyone just starting out would be heller confused trying to adopt their system. Remember: YOU are now the skipper, and YOU have the option to simplify rigging to suit your current needs, as long as the essential controls are in place. And that's it... later, as you become more adept at handling the boat, you can make changes if you so desire. :cool:

HEY, THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT THIS BOAT OF YOURS WILL CLEARLY BE FAST & FUN, ONCE YA DIAL HER IN THE WAY YOU WANT HER... :)

Here's that video showing a simplified method of rigging, one more suited to a beginner than some of the complicated rigging systems I've seen in videos:


P.S. I have no earthly idea why this hand is using that loose plank or board as a makeshift thwart, I'd lose that thing pronto... maybe it's another 'Unsolved Mystery of the Albacore!' ;)
 
Last edited:

never_sailed

New Member
Wow, that site really has everything about albacores, that will definitely be useful. It's a good video too, he seems to do fine without a crew member as well which is nice, I think your suggestion to start simple like that is a good one. He makes it look easy! I will need to find a way to attach my rudder, I saw in one video that they have a tendency to fall away into the deep after a capsize. That would suck.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Yeah, you'll need a small line to keep from losing that rudder, I noticed one or two hands mentioning that in different videos, and one guy said the rudders are expensive, LOL. :eek:

I just want you to know that YOU are the one calling the shots aboard this boat of yours... rig her as you see fit to match your current needs, aye? You can ALWAYS make things more complicated later, believe me... I've been aboard various racing craft in years past, and some of them had rigging so complex that no beginner could possibly fathom the purpose of each line, control, etc. Make things easier on yourself at the outset, you'll find that this will free you up to focus on other matters & tasks. :rolleyes:

Okay, I'm back to my Western, it's a Hopalong Cassidy novel titled THE MAN FROM BAR-20, and it is pretty darned funny... first published in 1918, go figure, but publication dates don't matter so much with Westerns, in fact the older material is often superior, LOL. ;)

P.S. About that keeper line for the rudder... see, you're already learning what's REALLY important!!! :D
 

never_sailed

New Member
Yeah, so I dug into that crack a bit. It's quite tough, fibrous stuff. I was quite ginger with it and didn't go all the way down to the fiberglass. I noticed that the material can bend as a sheet over the fiberglass below. Next I grabbed the anchor point for the mast and gave that a good tug, it felt very sold, only the slightest flex of the hull. So I think I'm good to go, maybe next week when my friend is free and the weather is better. I'll find some marine sealant at the hardware store and squirt it in there when it's good a dry.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Yeah, while briefly scanning some of those Albacore videos, I never saw another that had that cr@p on the cockpit floor, so it's probably a legacy left behind by some previous owner. Probably more trouble than it's worth to remove it, but if there's flex to it and open space beneath, maybe you can epoxy it down more firmly and seal up the remaining cracks with filler. The PO probably removed the mast step to apply that cr@p, then reinstalled the step... so if it feels solid underneath the step itself, I wouldn't mess with it, except to address the loose layer and fill the cracks. Good news, since that'll save ya time and money, you can always recoat it or paint it or whatever in the future if it gets too ugly. :confused:
 

Alan Stewart

New Member
In my 50+ years of messing around with boats, cruising, teaching, running charters, etc., I can honestly say that for $20 (or less “used”), ASA’s instruction manual on basic sailing is undoubtedly the best introductory tool for both novice sailors and even those who want to “brush-up” on their sailing skllls. They’ve changed the title at least once I believe, but it’s easy to find on Amazon if you try “ASA Introduction to Sailing” or “Sailing Made Easy”... something like that... It’s the most strait forward, well-illustrated manual there is, and has little quizzes at the end of each chapter to let you know how much you’ve learned. Terrific book!
For ALL manner of boat repairs there’s nothing better than Don Casey’s series of books from McGraw Hill - also beautifully illustrated and clearly written guides to fixing anything from leaky hulls to torn canvas and plenty more...
The splatter-type paint job inside your boat is a fairly common way of finishing boat cockpits and decks - it helps to hide any imperfections in the gelcoat as well as reducing the glare of too much bright white in the sun...
 

never_sailed

New Member
Awesome, I had a look for that and found "sailing made simple" at the link below. It looks like it really has everything, so I will read that through after work.

Still haven't taken it out, weather has been awful! Unless the thunderstorm watch disappears this afternoon, Wednesday is the first day in the forecast that might be amenable (low wind and no rain). But it's okay, the longer I wait the more I learn. I've watched videos about wind directions and stuff, will probably be launching with wind blowing from the shore out onto the lake so I will have to get back into the wind! I had to find out what the different ropes do as well - parts of the rigging and their purposes. I found a really great document online (link below) that I picked though at the weekend, some advanced rigging concepts that I will probably not make use of but the basics as well. Really interesting read, specific to the Albacore too. I made a little appendix for myself, photos of rigging parts from my boat and a description of their utility..
 

Alan Stewart

New Member
Ok, good work! That little book “Sailing Made Simple”, is not the American Sailing Association’s instruction manual though - “Sailing Made Easy” is much more comprehensive and user-friendly in my opinion, but if you’ve already picked up the other that’s fine too - I think I may have read that one many years ago... It’s all good!
Note: If you do go sailing from the beach and have to “claw” your way back upwind, you’ll want the help of your jib for sure, but your buddy will be there to lend a hand, right? ⛵
Have fun - the best learning comes from experience - making mistakes and learning from them is the best way to build confidence and competence!
 

never_sailed

New Member
Yeah, and thanks for the advice with the jib, I'll bring it. I had been considering leaving it, so that's good. Yeah, I won't go out alone until I get the hang of it.
 

never_sailed

New Member
Hey everyone, finally got out at the weekend! Thanks for all of the help! It was fantastic.

It ended up being a gusty day but it was the only day we could both get out, ~15 km/hr wind gusting in the mid 20s. We set most of the boat up before launch, just had to hoist the main and put the tiller on once we got in the water, this worked well. Backing up a trailer is difficult! Then we took off on a close reach with just the main up and the jib stowed. I was surprised at the speed, as were my friends on the shore. From on land these boats normally look quite peaceful but it was thrilling! I took the tiller and he took the main sheet. We heeled quite a bit in the gusts, almost tipped it a few times, probably captain's error! Saved by the crew letting out the main. It was a lot of fun.

So, very enjoyable. But sailing is harder than I thought! I was surprised how much the wind direction was moving around, with the gusts and also around islands. I think this is something I wasn't prepared for. I learned from my experienced crew was to make tiller adjustments to maintain the same angle to the wind when it is moving, rather than making adjustments to the main sheet. Next time I will have to master the main sheet and tiller at the same time - tougher than it sounds!
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
Yes, sailing is a learning experience, but a fun one.
After a lot of years on the water in relatively simple boats (Sunfish, Laser) I am still learning and making mistakes.
 
Top