What's new

My Bow Handle Pulled Out !!!! Oh NOOO!! Any Creative Fixes W/O Installing an Inspection Port?

Woodwind

Active Member
I’ve tossed around RotoZipping a narrow slot to slip in a full length fiberglass G10 backing plate and then gobbing 5200 in through the slot and old mounting holes, pulling it up tight against the underside of the hull, then redrilling the holes after all is cured.

The last step would be finishing the slot in the deck with Marine Tex and Saran Wrap prior to remounting the handle. The White Marine Tex is almost a perfect match for my deck I had real good luck in refinishing a ding on on the bow you can hardly see it…And the Krylon rattle can of paint I have It’s also almost a perfect match too.

Whaddya’ think?

I’ve sailed the _rap out of this boat and so far all is well except for the bow handle.
It is a blast!!! :D
 

shorefun

Active Member
You cant get a thin piece of glass in a slot at an angle then up to the bottom of the deck. Plus that area is not flat because of what would be left behind from the plate that is not there.

If you dont want an access hole take the trim off and split the seam and pry up the deck and slide in an aluminum plate. The epoxy the deck back down. This assumes you have the alumininum trim type boat. The curved edge would be more of a challange.
 

Woodwind

Active Member
You cant get a thin piece of glass in a slot at an angle then up to the bottom of the deck. Plus that area is not flat because of what would be left behind from the plate that is not there.

If you dont want an access hole take the trim off and split the seam and pry up the deck and slide in an aluminum plate. The epoxy the deck back down. This assumes you have the alumininum trim type boat. The curved edge would be more of a challange.
I have the curved edge so this is Out I think…. But the backing block did drop off to the bottom. I’ve got one of those tiny little inspection cameras I’m going to try to get a look at it. Will report back! :)
 

shorefun

Active Member
If you want to avoid the plate, the curved edge can be cleanly broke free. Heat and a smooth edged vibrating tool. If you go back far enough you can get enough separation to work the plate into position.

I repaired a bow last year. Here are pictures showing what the area looks like if that helps. They inside of the hule is kind of sloppy as the glass it brought together at the bow and they were not neat about it.

I also have removed a bunch of the epoxy seam fixing my other fish. Then put it back together with Thixo. I used the corner of the scraper tool on my oscillating tool and cleared a bunch of epoxy then sanded with 60 grit emory paper.

I am guessing you can use string run through the holes to pull and glue a new plate in position. The catch being figuring out the shape that will fit flush to the bottom of the deck. There will be bumps from the crappy quick hold downs used at the factory. Little pieces of glass run across the plate. You need the plate to fit flush to the deck. Given all these contrants, the deck hole becomes the simpler solution. In all honestly on my own boat I would likely try to separate the seam and get enough distance to get a plate in position.
 

Attachments

L&VW

Well-Known Member
After my two bow handle repairs, using my stainless steel and cutting board backing plates, I've decided that wood is the best choice. :oops:

My latest approach here:

(Posts with photos, see # 23 and # 24.

Earlier:

A little touch-up next Spring, and it will be undectable--even strengthening the side while doing it!
 

Woodwind

Active Member
If you want to avoid the plate, the curved edge can be cleanly broke free. Heat and a smooth edged vibrating tool. If you go back far enough you can get enough separation to work the plate into position.

I repaired a bow last year. Here are pictures showing what the area looks like if that helps. They inside of the hule is kind of sloppy as the glass it brought together at the bow and they were not neat about it.

I also have removed a bunch of the epoxy seam fixing my other fish. Then put it back together with Thixo. I used the corner of the scraper tool on my oscillating tool and cleared a bunch of epoxy then sanded with 60 grit emory paper.

I am guessing you can use string run through the holes to pull and glue a new plate in position. The catch being figuring out the shape that will fit flush to the bottom of the deck. There will be bumps from the crappy quick hold downs used at the factory. Little pieces of glass run across the plate. You need the plate to fit flush to the deck. Given all these contrants, the deck hole becomes the simpler solution. In all honestly on my own boat I would likely try to separate the seam and get enough distance to get a plate in position.
Thanks so much these pictures give me I really good idea of what’s underneath the deck there, I needed to see this!
Cheers!
 

Woodwind

Active Member
If you want to avoid the plate, the curved edge can be cleanly broke free. Heat and a smooth edged vibrating tool. If you go back far enough you can get enough separation to work the plate into position.

I repaired a bow last year. Here are pictures showing what the area looks like if that helps. They inside of the hule is kind of sloppy as the glass it brought together at the bow and they were not neat about it.

I also have removed a bunch of the epoxy seam fixing my other fish. Then put it back together with Thixo. I used the corner of the scraper tool on my oscillating tool and cleared a bunch of epoxy then sanded with 60 grit emory paper.

I am guessing you can use string run through the holes to pull and glue a new plate in position. The catch being figuring out the shape that will fit flush to the bottom of the deck. There will be bumps from :D the crappy quick hold downs used at the factory. Little pieces of glass run across the plate. You need the plate to fit flush to the deck. Given all these contrants, the deck hole becomes the simpler solution. In all honestly on my own boat I would likely try to separate the seam and get enough distance to get a plate in position.
I do have an oscillating tool and plenty of glass and fillers West System….Maybe this is my opportunity to try out thixo. !
 

Woodwind

Active Member
After my two bow handle repairs, using my stainless steel and cutting board backing plates, I've decided that wood is the best choice. :oops:

My latest approach here:

(Posts with photos, see # 23 and # 24.

Earlier:

A little touch-up next Spring, and it will be undectable--even strengthening the side while doing it!
TWO :eek:
 

Woodwind

Active Member
If you want to avoid the plate, the curved edge can be cleanly broke free. Heat and a smooth edged vibrating tool. If you go back far enough you can get enough separation to work the plate into position.

I repaired a bow last year. Here are pictures showing what the area looks like if that helps. They inside of the hule is kind of sloppy as the glass it brought together at the bow and they were not neat about it.

I also have removed a bunch of the epoxy seam fixing my other fish. Then put it back together with Thixo. I used the corner of the scraper tool on my oscillating tool and cleared a bunch of epoxy then sanded with 60 grit emory paper.

I am guessing you can use string run through the holes to pull and glue a new plate in position. The catch being figuring out the shape that will fit flush to the bottom of the deck. There will be bumps from the crappy quick hold downs used at the factory. Little pieces of glass run across the plate. You need the plate to fit flush to the deck. Given all these contrants, the deck hole becomes the simpler solution. In all honestly on my own boat I would likely try to separate the seam and get enough distance to get a plate in position.
Really nice glass work!!
 

Woodwind

Active Member
If you want to avoid the plate, the curved edge can be cleanly broke free. Heat and a smooth edged vibrating tool. If you go back far enough you can get enough separation to work the plate into position.

I repaired a bow last year. Here are pictures showing what the area looks like if that helps. They inside of the hule is kind of sloppy as the glass it brought together at the bow and they were not neat about it.

I also have removed a bunch of the epoxy seam fixing my other fish. Then put it back together with Thixo. I used the corner of the scraper tool on my oscillating tool and cleared a bunch of epoxy then sanded with 60 grit emory paper.

I am guessing you can use string run through the holes to pull and glue a new plate in position. The catch being figuring out the shape that will fit flush to the bottom of the deck. There will be bumps from the crappy quick hold downs used at the factory. Little pieces of glass run across the plate. You need the plate to fit flush to the deck. Given all these contrants, the deck hole becomes the simpler solution. In all honestly on my own boat I would likely try to separate the seam and get enough distance to get a plate in position.
Also I’m thinking isnt there an angled thin oscillating tool blade that you could slip in a slot and slide along the underside and cut those straps and tabs loose that held the blocks in?? Just an idea… I’ll mess around with it in the near future and see what I can come up with. Thanks so much for your input!!!
 

mixmkr

Well-Known Member
I cut holes in the bottom, epoxied aluminum plates to the deck underside and tapped screws. The other option is thru bolting too. The repair, repairing the new bottom hole, keeps the deck, port free.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
When I replace my donated Sunfish deck-cleat next Spring, I intend to cut an irregular eight-inch hole in the bottom, bolt the cleat, turn the section a few degrees, bond that cut-out piece to the inside, add mat to fill, and return the bottom to smooth/fair. For very little weight "penalty", this has the benefit of strengthening the bottom against the ample flexing you can't see while underway! :eek:

Just an idea… I’ll mess around with it in the near future and see what I can come up with. Thanks so much for your input!!!
There's nothing quite as rewarding as "messing around with boats"! ;)
 

Oh Sheet

New Member
Did this on 2 boats and it worked. I am careful when lifting to grab the edges.I drilled 3/8 holes where all screws were. Next I coated 3/8 wooden dowl rod with resin and stuck them in the holes all the to boat bottom. After curing I cut them off flush with the deck. Then I put 2 fine layers of glass over carefully cut to the footprint of handle. After that cured I placed the handle on and drilled pilot holes for self tapping screws, I think # 10. Bedded it down with 5200.
 

Oh Sheet

New Member
I try to avoid ports on the deck but sometimes that is the only real option. But I like ports in forward side of foot well. I have re attached foam blocks and sponged out water through them.
 
Top