Mounting options for a trolling motor/Minn Kota

Thread starter #1
I just ordered a Minn Kota 40#....as far as mounting options I would prefer no holes. Can I just glue 2 layers of oak ply to the transom on the inner and outside? Any suggestions on batteries? Do these lead batteries die after hitting the water?
 
#2
Experience tells me you want that motor mount to be strong and secure. The torque that a trolling motor puts out is surprising when you're docking, for instance, and quickly go from full forward to full reverse.

Wouldn't using glue leave a scar on the hull if you remove the plywood later? Here's a pic of the Minn Kota mount I made for my 55# motor that I'm using now. Four stainless bolts and wing nuts. Used solid oak and Minwax Helmsman spar urathane to seal. The other great bright work on the stern is cosmetic, from the previous owner. I just worked around it.

A 40# motor is a great choice for this boat.

Are you planning on motoring quite a bit, or just to get in and out of your launch area?

I've experimented with all sorts of setups on sailboats this size... 28 to 80 lbs thrust, 12 and 24 volts, 1 and 2 batteries, Minn Kota and MotorGuide... circuit breakers, various wire types, varying mounting positions and methods, etc. etc.
 

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Thread starter #3
Looks simple enough. I was trying to avoid adding another set of holes in the hull for water to get into. I assume those holes go to the inside of the hull with washers? It is mostly for getting in and out of the dock or back to the dock if the wind picks up too much or dies. I also though a marine batter from Walmart or Costco would be a better option than the Maxx.
 
#6
I used 6 gauge Temco Easy-Flex welding cable. Very flexible and durable. You can buy it by-the-foot on Fleabay.

I fished the cable under the cockpit bench to the hatch area, using a telescoping dock hook. This required climbing all the way inside the hatch area, which was not very fun for me.

I used Anderson electrical plugs as well, rated for 50A. Industrial strength stuff.

Probably overkill, but better too much than too little.
 

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#7
Experience tells me you want that motor mount to be strong and secure. The torque that a trolling motor puts out is surprising when you're docking, for instance, and quickly go from full forward to full reverse.

Wouldn't using glue leave a scar on the hull if you remove the plywood later? Here's a pic of the Minn Kota mount I made for my 55# motor that I'm using now. Four stainless bolts and wing nuts. Used solid oak and Minwax Helmsman spar urathane to seal. The other great bright work on the stern is cosmetic, from the previous owner. I just worked around it.

A 40# motor is a great choice for this boat.

Are you planning on motoring quite a bit, or just to get in and out of your launch area?

I've experimented with all sorts of setups on sailboats this size... 28 to 80 lbs thrust, 12 and 24 volts, 1 and 2 batteries, Minn Kota and MotorGuide... circuit breakers, various wire types, varying mounting positions and methods, etc. etc.
I really like that wood working on the transom! I would like to do the same on my A16 and possibly Capri. Could you post more pictures from the back side and cockpit?

Jim Tompkins
 
#9
Strange, when I tried to add some pics it says "The uploaded file is too large for the server to process." But they're way below the file size limit.
 
#10
I must give a word to the wise after going out today that with my setup the traveler line kept getting caught up on the trolling motor and/or motor mounting hardware. The traveler pulled on the motor enough to almost break it loose from the mounting board, twice. If not for my quick (and remarkably lucky) thinking, I would have lost the trolling motor for sure. Best to bring the trolling motor completely out of the water and stow horizontally with the tiller to one side. This way the traveler is free from any possible tangles.
 
#11
I made a motor mount similar to the factory capri 14.2 mount that Catalina sells. It has similar dimensions, but the motor mounting block/pad swivels in at the top allowing the motors head to be withdrawn into the cockpit and having it resting on the seat with the handle pointing toward the sole/floor. I wanted to keep the motor head away from the traveller/bridle and also not have the prop hanging out so far. Additionally, I wanted the prop to stay clear of the rudder.

I used two small pieces of white oak flooring for backers. I cut these to following the contour of the hull. The screws on the port side backer are easy to get to from a beckson plate mounted on the seat. For the inner backing block I had to install a brass threaded insert because the oak block fit snug up into the upper transom lip.

I fabbed a proof of concept out of plywood and sst hardware. I will be testing it this week or next week. Eventually the real parts will be bent SST or aluminum plate. I will try to post some pictures in the next couple days.

- JimT
 
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