What's new

mast step rebuild

traversemariner

New Member
rebuilt mast step after failure now mast does not rotate as smoothly as before rebuild. Any thoughts on how that will play out with malfunction?
 

ProATC

Active Member
Did you make the repair inside of the step where the mast would go; OR, the traditional way through an inspection port and reinforced what would be the outside of the step and inside the boat? It also depends on where the friction is occurring in the step with the mast. Did you replace the plastic plug on the end of the mast that goes into the step? A common attempt is to put down the step a thin metal disk with a teflon disk on top (commonly sold at Laser parts websites) at the bottom of the step for the mast to sit on, in case sand or any other debris is causing the problem. If that doesn't work, then wait until you start to see some aluminum wear/discoloration on the sides of the step from sailing to try and find where the problem might be, then you can attempt to sand/polish/lubricate that area.

Is the problem with the lack of rotation a concern while you are sailing, as in a noticeable decrease in performance, or just an annoyance more or less? Not sure what you mean by "...play out with malfunction?"
 

traversemariner

New Member
Thank you for your response. I had a catastrophic insertion tube and surrounding deck area failure. I replaced wooden puck and rebuilt insertion tube and reinforced deck area where insertion tube sits. I repaired insertion tube both internaly and externally. I can get mast in and rotate mast however with some effort. I have not yet sailed and have some concerns that this may create some significant forces on hull and wood puck at bottom. I did not replace the plastic plug on mast. I think the problem is smaller internal mast tube dimensions as a consequence of realigning fragments and application of resin.
 

ProATC

Active Member
Wow, okay! Yes, your assumption is probably the reason, smaller internal tube if you repaired the catastrophic piece, especially on the inside. Unless you have not sanded very well or more to increase the internal diameter of the mast step, not sure how to improve your situation without saying to replace the tube. You have to bore it out, basically. And I would assume you wouldn't need more than a couple mm. A suggestion would be to buy a metal disk for the bottom of the step to see if it actually fits in the tube all the way down. They might be magnetic (can't find mine at the moment to test), and if so use a telescoping magnet (Harbor Freight sells them to retrieve bolts/nuts in engine bays) and by sliding that disk down the tube, you should be able to tell where you need to fair it. And, hopefully, your tube is straight from top to bottom.

If you reinforced the tube to the hull, and all around the wooden puck as others have done and posted here, I would not worry about another failure. I would worry about the mast not rotating as it was designed to do, before you sail, just in case. Light air, probably not so much.
 

HelgeS

Member
Cover the mast with carwax, insert, twist turn 1cm, then see where the failure is. Sand away irregularities with sandpaper on a stick. Depth should be 14". Glue in a metal disk, lower it with a vacuum cleaner.
 
Top