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mainsheet getting caught - transom corner inserts?

cskudder

Active Member
In this other thread, Paul Jeffers mentions "transom corner inserts" as a non-legal modification that reduces the chance of the mainsheet getting caught on the transom corner in a tack. I'm a recreational-only sailor so being legal doesn't matter to me.

Can anybody help me understand these, or better yet, find them, or something else that helps with this problem?

many thanks in advance
Chris
 

laserxd

Member
there is an even easier fix, sheet in main going into the gybe, then as the pressure in the sail is lost, give the mainsheet a nice tug

if you do it right, it works everytime, I have some footage that show's the technique close up, I'll upload it on youtube after it's edited,

watch Andrew gybe:
 

laserxd

Member
also, in really light air you can keep the trav blocks on the windward side, it helps keep the sheet out of the water
 

Biggestnacho

New Member
there is an even easier fix, sheet in main going into the gybe, then as the pressure in the sail is lost, give the mainsheet a nice tug

if you do it right, it works everytime, I have some footage that show's the technique close up, I'll upload it on youtube after it's edited,

watch Andrew gybe:
Which of the two gybes would be the better one since Andrew applies two different techniques?
1st: Pulling in mainsheet and then tugging on the mainsheet at the traveller block or
2nd: pulling in mainsheet and the tugging infront of the mainsheet block...
Or are both acceptable/ undecided between sailors?
 

laserxd

Member
Both are common in racing, you'll see the pro's use both depending on the situation and for tactical reasons

The first technique is usually for running/sailing deep/by the lee downwind, when the boom is out at around 90 degrees, it requires very little helm and as you can see Andrew came out of the gybe without losing any speed and without a big change in course, for day sailing this would be useful if you need to gybe without a big course change, you'll go from by the lee to regular flow on the new tack, this technique would be used tactically in tight situations to gybe into a right of way position ect. This type of gybe is not practical in heavy breeze.

The second technique is used mostly when you're on a broad reach course gybing to come out on the new tack on a broad reach, it's easier to roll the boat and this will always be used in heavy air (without the big roll), this technique is used for reaches like on a Harry Anderson course where you gybe from broad reach to beam reach, and beam reach to running, The way you balance the boat with your weight is important, before the gybe the boat should be flat or slight leeward heel, then you want to heel to windward while you sheet in, pump the main as the pressure is lost, switch sides and flatten the boat on the new gybe (more wind, less roll is needed), the roll can actually initiate the gybe rather than sailing deeper and deeper,

it's alot more fun to gybe with these techniques and you won't get caught up
 

Keithdb

New Member
Does anybody actualy know whether the transom inserts even really exist? I've seen several mentions of them but never a single picture. Hands up anybody that's actually seen them in real life.
 

PommeDeTerre

Drifting too far from the shore
In this other thread, Paul Jeffers mentions "transom corner inserts" as a non-legal modification that reduces the chance of the mainsheet getting caught on the transom corner in a tack. I'm a recreational-only sailor so being legal doesn't matter to me.

Can anybody help me understand these, or better yet, find them, or something else that helps with this problem?

many thanks in advance
Chris
Funny... I'm a new-to-the-Laser, recreational guy, too, and this happened to me several times this past weekend! I'll be happy to make this a thing of the past.
 

161919

AT SSC
If you have a older boat you need to tape the joint of the blocks so they dont flex while jibing, then when the boom is about to change sides you give a big pull on the mainsheet so it will tension and not get tangled on the corner.
 

cskudder

Active Member
OP here- Thanks for all the input. Update-
I put a 2nd line across the transom from one traveller eye to the other, and tied an overhand knot around the traveller itself at 2 points, which limits the traveller blocks to the middle 1/3 of the traveller line. I only sail recreational so I don't need to be race legal. This didn't completely solve the problem but it did reduce it considerably when I was out in 12-15 kts yesterday.

Most of the time I sail back+forth across the lake typically coming about from approximately beam reach to beam reach. I've been heading up + sheeting in ahead of the tack to avoid the problem, but it would sure be convenient + nice not to have to mess with that (sure that's pretty lazy + kinda greedy, but, well, why not).

In this pic-
the traveller is the top line (blue with red), and the limiter is the bottom line (blue with black). I loosened the limiter up for the picture so you could see it separate from the traveller. It probably makes sense to just skip the separate limiter line, and simply tie a couple figure-8 knots in the traveller itself.

This was a definite improvement. Next time out I think I'm gonna try running some packing or strapping tape from the aft corner of the deck down onto the transom and the side of the hull, and see if that helps the sheet slide off that corner, if or when it does get caught even with this limiter. If the tape helps, maybe I'll glass some foam in like that.

And again if anybody can shed any light on a commercial "transom insert," I'm still interested in knowing about what's out there. I appreciate all the technique pointers, and I'll bet a lot of that's real useful to many others on the forum. But you can probably tell from my comments that I'm looking for a lazy and effective way to prevent the sheet from hanging up, with a strong preference for "a hardware solution" that minimizes it, with a minimum of effort on my part --- :D

thanks again
 

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