Leakage

Thread starter #1
I’ve recently bought a lightly used 90’s Laser 153335. In my first three outings I’ve drained enough water to be of concern. The only damage I can see is to the gudgeon attachments, but it seems well repaired. The bailer is missing, so I’m using only the plug with the tiny whole, so I collect a little water in the cockpit. Where could the water in the hull be coming from?
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#4
What were the conditions like - were there big waves, did you capsize? If there was both light and heavy winds, did you get as much water?

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#5
There are many places. In high wind it could be the underside of the rail separating. In all winds it could be between the hulls from an over-tightened bailer tube. And the obvious place in the dagger board trunk. Bad O-ring on the drain plug?
 
Thread starter #6
Just curious - how long were you on the water, and approximately how much water drained out once you were ashore and pulled the plug?
I’ve now had three episodes. The first two were light wind days, max 5 mph. Today was about 20 mph, lots of higher gusts. First two days I was out about 1.5 hrs, today about three. Water yield, by time to drain was about equal each day. If I had to estimate, a half gallon. Capsized intentionally first two outings, just to familiarize myself with process. Today capsized unintentionally, turned turtle, sheets tangled in tiller, the whole shebang. Much time spent with mast horizontal.

I’d guess it is related to time on water, not stress on hull.
There are many places. In high wind it could be the underside of the rail separating. In all winds it could be between the hulls from an over-tightened bailer tube. And the obvious place in the dagger board trunk. Bad O-ring on the drain plug?
Drain plug new & tight. Tell me more about bailer tube. How would I know if overthightened? Auto bailer kaput, has been removed. New one on order. With so much wind today, cockpit basically dry with plug out. Plug now property of turtles, who caused capsize.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#7
Ok, as it happened in very light air, it's not the mast step. Could still be the bailer hole, but as you capsized every time, I'm thinking the water might be entering (as Eddie suggested) through the deck/hull seam. Turn the boat upside down and check if there are any visible cracks along it, and/or test it with filling the interior with water (not completely :D - less than ten litres will do), turn the boat on its side(s) and see if anything seeps out. You might as well check the bailer hole at the same time with the same method.

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#8
Unfortunatley, the only way to tell if it's the bailer tube is leaking is to unscrew it and seal between the tub and the hull and re assemble. You need two 1" open end wrenches or 1 super thin walled socket, and 2 people to unscrew it. LaLi's method of putting water in the hull is what I did to find the leaks in the seam. I used 10 gallons instead of 10 liters. :p
 
#9
Another way to check seams is to cover breather hole and with boat upside down cover seams with shaving soap mixed with water. Pump in air (not much) and check for bubbles.
As it happens, I've never made this work.
On the other hand we did finally discover the small but persistent leak in my daughter's boat after ten years. The leak was in the rear of the centreboard case which we finally proved by gaffer taping over bottom exit, filling the case with water and checking what leaked into the boat

Steve
 
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