Laser2 mainsail halyard

Thread starter #21
I've never seen a boat this old in the UK, my mast plug is rivetted in....

However getting rivets out is really easy, just use a 10mm drill to remove the heads and then drill through with the size the rivets are, or punch the remains out.

As a long time boat bimbler I have a pop rivet gun and a large selection of rivets, come in really handy!! cunningham.JPG mastbottom.jpg pic1.JPG pic2.JPG pic3.JPG cunningham.JPG mastbottom.jpg pic1.JPG pic2.JPG pic3.JPG cunningham.JPG mastbottom.jpg pic1.JPG pic2.JPG pic3.JPG cunningham.JPG mastbottom.jpg

BTW, you do not have to put stainless steel rivets in, aluminium will do fine for the sheave box and you will not have eletrolysis problems.
These are my final pics with a last few questions:
1. The mainsail - you can see there's a few more inches at the top, which I can raise. The rope attached to the wire loop of the halyard is through the jib winch right now just to hold up the sail. Even if I was able to attach a rope to the loop, small enough to go around the block, I still wouldn't be able to bring the wire loop up enough to go over the cleat. Would a thin spliced plastic rope, sown together on the wire loop, be strong enough if I got it around and over the cleat?
2. The sail seems to bunch up and is not smooth.
3. The leftover cord of the outhaul is just hanging there. What can I do with it?
4. As mentioned in the outhaul post, the cords going double through the cleat are not smooth. Should there be a small block there?

Any other suggestions would be most welcome. I'd like to get it into the water this weekend to see how everything works.
 

LaLi

Active Member
#23
1. I have a hard time understanding what you mean here, but I'll try to explain what I think you'd need to do.
First, take the halyard tail out of the exit block on the mast, completely. You won't need that block until the halyard runs on the inside of the mast again.
As you want to use the existing halyard wire externally and the existing halyard hook, you need a new turning block on the outside. The simplest way to attach one is by tying it with a piece of rope below (or possibly through) the vang fitting. Adjust the length of that rope so the sheave of that new block on the outside is approximately at the same height as the sheave of the exit block. This way you'd have a halyard working like the original, but on the outside.
Another option would be to install a new halyard hook or rack approximately at the same height as the vang fitting.
2. Doesn't matter. If it's still "bunched up" on the water, we'll talk about it later.
3. Tie it around the mast.
4. No, there shouldn't be any blocks there. And the line shouldn't be twisted around itself like that! No wonder it doesn't run.
But most importantly, please rig a clew tie-down. That is, a piece of rope through the clew eye and around the boom: http://lasersailingtips.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Clew-Tie-down.png
And one more point from the outhaul picture... it looks like you're using a knot that unties itself pretty fast. This is what you want: Ulkosorkka – Wikipedia
Let me know if I'm missing any pictures.
I'd actually like to see how the traveller is rigged. That's the only thing I see is wrong with the original manual: it lists quite a few options, none of which does the job very well.
 

LaLi

Active Member
#25
Ok, that's rigged like a Laser traveller. In the Laser, you want the traveller block almost always to be as far outboard and as low as possible. The Laser 2, however, has a sloop rig which means the boom is sheeted on the centreline up to fully powered conditions, and even when overpowered, you use the mainsheet as the sideways adjustment by keeping the vang tight. This means you don't want the traveller block to "travel" sideways at all, and you want it to be as high as possible. Which is the opposite what yours is doing. :D

What you want is essentially this: http://laser2.est.org/rigging/Traveler.png
In short, the smaller traveller block is removed, the larger one is tied so that it's always on the centreline, and the tails of the line are taken through the same fairlead and tied together. If you can unscrew the hook from the larger block, fine, but you can keep it, too. If your existing line is too short, don't worry, just extend it with another piece.
To your point #1 above, what size block or type to get?
This would be pretty much perfect: Harken 29mm Bullet Block for Wire
 
Thread starter #26
Ok, that's rigged like a Laser traveller. In the Laser, you want the traveller block almost always to be as far outboard and as low as possible. The Laser 2, however, has a sloop rig which means the boom is sheeted on the centreline up to fully powered conditions, and even when overpowered, you use the mainsheet as the sideways adjustment by keeping the vang tight. This means you don't want the traveller block to "travel" sideways at all, and you want it to be as high as possible. Which is the opposite what yours is doing. :D

What you want is essentially this: http://laser2.est.org/rigging/Traveler.png
In short, the smaller traveller block is removed, the larger one is tied so that it's always on the centreline, and the tails of the line are taken through the same fairlead and tied together. If you can unscrew the hook from the larger block, fine, but you can keep it, too. If your existing line is too short, don't worry, just extend it with another piece.
This would be pretty much perfect: Harken 29mm Bullet Block for Wire
Thank you for all your assistance and advice. I'll let you know how everything works...
Norm
 
Thread starter #29
Here's the redone Traveller.
Wrong picture.
On the other picture you see that I used an ordinary pulley that I had so your idea is great and works well except there's still the problem of getting the knot small enough to fit through the block. Obviously it doesn't with this one. Will it with the one that you suggested ?
 

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LaLi

Active Member
#30
Traveller: now you're halfway there - the block doesn't move along the line anymore, but the line itself will move from tack to tack. Just copy the setup that I linked to in post #25 and you'll be all set.

Halyard: it's about how thick your halyard tail is. Harken classic bullet blocks have an opening of about 10 mm, and if you want a bowline to go through, the rope can't be more than 3 mm thick (just tested). 4 mm is ok if you sew or splice it to the wire.
 
Thread starter #31
Traveller: now you're halfway there - the block doesn't move along the line anymore, but the line itself will move from tack to tack. Just copy the setup that I linked to in post #25 and you'll be all set.

Halyard: it's about how thick your halyard tail is. Harken classic bullet blocks have an opening of about 10 mm, and if you want a bowline to go through, the rope can't be more than 3 mm thick (just tested). 4 mm is ok if you sew or splice it to the wire.
The rope is 3mm. Is bowline the smallest knot that can be used?
 

LaLi

Active Member
#32
Is bowline the smallest knot that can be used?
Several different knots that could be used for this are just about equally bulky, but the idea with the bowline is that you can make it into a long loop (in this case, at least 5 cm), so you wouldn't be pulling the knotted point in the line and the actual wire/rope joint through the block at the same time.
 
Thread starter #33
Just out of curiosity, since mine is wrong, if the mainsail halyard is inside the mast, how is the rope tied onto the wire loop in order to allow it to pass through the small block at the base of the mast? See pic#1
 
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