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Just got a Laser

Tbagger

New Member
So my club had a silent auction and I won the bid on a laser. A older member said it was a special hull as it was one of the first lasers built, not too sure about that, but there's no hull number anywhere on this boat. There's what looks like a sticker on the back side of the tub that says, I think, performance sailing, Pointe Claire, Canada. The member said the hull is from the early 70's. I know it has several coats of paint on her as I'm sanding it down, going to prime and paint. The hull is in so, so, condition, lots of stress cracks and dings, the best part of the deal was the three different masts and four sails, two of them new, that the club had for the boat. Plan on getting her shaped up and maybe racing in the clubs weekly races. It'd be nice to know just how old it is.
 

Rob B

Well-Known Member
take the plastic bow fitting off. There should be a number under it. That's your hull #
 

Rob B

Well-Known Member
While you're at it take ALL of the fittings off and reseal everything with Life Caulk. Do this every 3 years.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
take the plastic bow fitting off. There should be a number under it. That's your hull #
If that's been painted over (as it sounds like it might), sand that spot (between the screwholes) lightly. The number might then reveal itself.

_
 

Mashmaster

Active Member
My hull had the serial number embossed on the transom, check there too. Mine is a 1974 hull. My sun fixed it up and now sails in our Yacht club weekly races, doesn't have to be class legal for those.

Send pics.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
First Laser you've owned? Congrats, they sure are cool boats, even the older ones... I had Laser #2069 for decades, and she served me well. Wish I had never let her go, but I was desperate for money at some point in the past, and like a fool I wound up selling her. Later, I bought a 12' Minifish which also served me well, between those two boats I had many nautical adventures, LOL. :rolleyes:

Anyway, it sounds like you scored with the extra spars, sails, etc., you've probably already done this but you wanna check those spars to make sure they aren't bent... sometimes you'll find a bent or dinged-up specimen in a collection of spars. Enjoy your boat, and post pics like ProATC suggested, particularly any areas which might look sketchy in terms of wear or damage. :confused:

Oh, yeah, LP or Linear Polyurethane primer & paint are good on small craft hulls, as they tend to flex just a bit as the hull works in a seaway... others use enamel or certain high-dollar options, but LP is a good cost-effective choice for small craft, it wears well and takes a lot of abuse. Kinda like those enablers in abusive relationships, only they don't wear as well, aye? ;)
 

Tbagger

New Member
Thanks for the replies, plastic bow fitting meaning the one that looks like a handle on the foredeck. I looked under that, nothing there that I could see and the deck is the only part not painted, I'll look closer once I right the boat. Today the first coat of Epifanes mono-urethane went on. First laser, been club racing for over twenty years, sunfish, flying scot, mariner etc, I've been lucky enough to have had about a dozen different sailboats, retired earlier this year and wanted smaller boats to move around and sail alone. My wife and I usually sail a 16ft Mistral together. The radial mast and sail were the ones the club got with boat, the others they bought new along with the sails and a new radial sail to boot, also got a extra boom. I'll try the picture thing when she's done but not too savvy with computers, only turn my cell phone a couple times a month.
 

Tbagger

New Member
Okay, so no hull number anywhere on this boat, unless it was on what's left of that sticker in the back wall of the tub. Definitely not on transom, took the plastic bow fitting off, cleaned the area good, nothing there. I own the boat, not going to change anything but was just curious. never had a boat without a visible hull number. On another point, taking off the main sheet block I found it was attached with the kind of expanding anchors you use on drywall, what the.... it was really loose can't believe it didn't rip out. When I took the screws out the anchors fell into the hull, guess that's where that new inspection port is going, gotta get in there and put new hardware with backing plates, all deck hardware is now off the deck, going to be re-bedded. Comments always welcome.
 

ProATC

Member
Sounds like you really know what you are doing. Everything you mentioned is a great way to repair it all, and you will be glad you did once you sail her again. The lack of a hull number is no big deal unless you try and register it, I have heard on these boards that it might be harder to register that way in your state. If not registering then no worries.

I always like the pics of the mast step after the deck is cut open to see how well it has stood up all these years. I actually put the deck back on mine and eventually will put the inspection port next to the dagger-board slot. Knowing that now, back then, I would have cut a little bit bigger hole than the 5" diameter inspection port so I would've had more room to access the mast step repair. Something to think about before you start.
 

Tbagger

New Member
I like fixing boats as much as sailing them. Once cut out the whole balsa core floor of a flying scot and then re-cored it. Also built a 16ft mahogany runabout from plans bought from Glen-L, it's a beauty and two 14ft wooden paddle boards from plans from Chesapeake lightcraft, so I've got some boat building experience. One step at a time, we'll see how it goes
 

Tbagger

New Member
I have to check that mast step, a little concerned after reading all the posts on that subject. There's a inspection port on the bow already but it's half way between the bow fitting and the mast step, you can't reach either from it, not sure why you'd make a hole in a boat without a good reason. Being a ex competitive muscle head who still sports 18" arms I'm not getting very far in that 5" hole. ProATC, saw pictures of your mast repair, nice job, If I have to tackle that repair I would hope it looks as good.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Remember, one of those small yet bright LED flashlights & a compact mirror can help you spot damage in the hull void or interior, even if you have to focus from a short distance. Any ugly cracks or damage will usually show... just gotta work the correct angles with the mirror. A rag often helps to prop up mirror or flashlight as you do this. When I say "compact mirror" I mean the largest one that will fit through the hole, some of those rectangular camping mirrors (with real glass) will fit alright. :confused:

Another option is to hold a small camera as far in there as you can and let 'er rip, using the flash to illuminate any damage... multiple shots from multiple angles will sometimes reveal problems which need to be addressed. :eek:
 

Riv

Member
The front port maybe to help dry out the boat. Does it have one at the back? I remember a book advocating a free flow of air...
 

Tbagger

New Member
Yes, I got a shop light in the port today and took some pics with my cell phone ( finally found a use for that thing) and the doughnut looks intact, dry and in good shape based on other pics I've seen here. When my paint is good and dry I'll flip the hull, put some water in the mast hole and see what happens. Only one port hole, I used two and a heat lamp with a small fan for 6 months to dry out my current sunfish, which by the way I'm kicking butt with at club races. Moving forward, always forward, thanks for the interest.
 
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