Just bought a Sunfish. (lots of pics.)

Thread starter #1
I believe it's a 67 model. At least this is what the previous owner though it was. But now that I own it, I plan to repaint it and for now, use it down here in the Houston area. I'm looking for the cheapest/easiest way to paint it. So where do you guys reccommend I buy the paint? I don't have a lot of money right now, so I may use it as is for now and paint it when I get the money. But I really want to make it look better and protect it so I can use it for awhile.

When I picked up the boat, the gelcoat rubs off on my hands like chalk. The sails are in decent shape, but one needs patched, so I may pick up some sail patching tape for now. I only bought it all for $150, so right now I don't want to invest a lot of money into it, I just want to use it as a recreational hobby.

I also need to find a bailer plug, as it's is missing the plug and the previous owner just filled the bailer with silicone.

I am open to suggestions, but like I said, I'm broke and would like to do it right, but as inexpensive as possible.

This is what I bought:
Hull
Aluminum Rudder with tiller
Two centerboards
mast
two sails along with the frames.
Trailer.

Here are the pics i have of it.



Here you can see where it's been patched.




The Sails












I also have to remount the plastic piece in front of the cockpit.
 
#2
There is a one part epoxy paint called "easy poxy", I believe it's made by International Paint, this or a similar type of paint would do the trick within a budget. The paint is easy to apply, is very durable and comes in many colors. I personally wouldn't bother with the bailer, just carry an old plastic bleach bottle and cut it so it's like a scoop, that will bail very well. I removed the bailer from my 07 SF as it kept getting banged about during loading and unloading from the trailer, eventually it began to leak. I taped a piece of smooth plastic up against the drain hole, from the outside of the hull, I then filled the hole with Marine-Tex, just enough to slightly overfill. I then taped another piece of smmoth plastic on top of the Marine-Tex filled hole, this resulted in a gel coat smooth finish on both sides. No regrets.
 
#3
Looks like a start to a great adventure. Thank you for the pictures.

Believe it or not, a lot of people suggested using exterior latex paint. They said it is made to protect from the sun and is fairly durable. I used white on the bottom of both of my boats.

It is pretty good protection against the elements except that it is not vary scratch resistant. If you really want to go cheap by the cans at Lowes or Homedepot that the color mix was not what the customer wanted. These sell for 10 cents on the dollar. Stay away from the oil based paints as they will not be too good for the environment.

BrainCorrel
 
Thread starter #4
Thanks for the comments guys. I will look around for my options, but I prefer not to spend over $60 for the paint. I really want a durable paint though, one that will protect the hull and be marine grade. I plan to sand the boat, so it will be smooth and I will lose some of the gel coat. I wouldn't mind painting the whole boat white, or the bottom blue with the top white. Mainly I want to make it look nice again while protecting it. It will be used in salt water and see sand. So i don't want to destroy it while using it. I will, of course, try to avoid beaching it or dragging it on the sand though.
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#5
  1. I believe it's a 67 model.
  2. I plan to repaint it and for now, So where do you guys reccommend I buy the paint? I don't have a lot of money right now . . .
  3. When I picked up the boat, the gelcoat rubs off on my hands like chalk.
  4. The sails are in decent shape, but one needs patched, so I may pick up some sail patching tape for now.
  5. I only bought it all for $150, so right now I don't want to invest a lot of money into it, I just want to use it as a recreational hobby.
  6. I also need to find a bailer plug, as it's is missing the plug and the previous owner just filled the bailer with silicone.
  7. I am open to suggestions, but like I said, I'm broke and would like to do it right, but as inexpensive as possible.
  8. I also have to remount the plastic piece in front of the cockpit.
You have a challenge ahead of you

1 - I think you're in the ballpark there.

2 - To Help Zeppo out, EasyPoxy is a one part polyurethane by Pettit. It's good stuff, a little less expensive than average, and goes on well.
A low budget alternative is Rust-Oleum Marine topside paints. Not really up to the higher quality marine paint standards, it's an old school oil based paint (today’s better paints are polyurethanes). Rust-Oleum is, however, really cheap by comparison and will get you a couple of years down the road. Color choice is limited.

3 - You are going to sand to prep for your paint anyway, but if you want to get rid of the oxidization in the mean time, scrub the boat down using Comet. The abrasive will act like heavy rubbing compound to remove a majority of the chalky build-up.

4 - That one sail doesn't look so good..., the Snark Mach-II "M" sail.
If you grabbed two fists full of windbreaker and tugged firmly you'd expect to just have a tug-o-war with your self..., can you do this all around both sails without the sail shredding? If not, they're rotted and gone. Be serious about it now or the wind will do it for you later..., and you'll paddle home. You do have a paddle, don't you? ;)

5 - How much does the hull weigh. Roll it side-up onto a bathroom scale.

6 - Rare item, the brass ones ... long out of production. Might end up getting the newer plastic bailer as a complete replacement from a dealer.

7 - You've got a Sunfish with a Snark Mach-II rudder. The installation looks a little shaky and may cause you some repair time to secure solidly. Other than that, if at least one sail is serviceable you'll get there. Grab a free copy of the setup manual off the Laser Performance web site so you get things put together right. Just ignore all the new looking stuff, it still assembles in about the same way it has for the past 50 years.

8 - I think you are going to want to install an inspection port to do this. Check the earlier posts..., someone just asked about this.

.
 
Thread starter #6
Depending on the cost, I planned on installing an inspection port. Everything felt solid when I was playing around with it, and I planned on using the sunfish sail. I do not have a paddle, but where I plan to test it, it won't matter. I will have to price the paints, I know one marine store I went to was expensive, the cheapest paint was $40 a pint. I will try to weigh it later, but it didn't feel too heavy when I carried it. It's been sitting for the past 3 years upside down outside. So i expect it to have moisture in it.
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#7
Depending on the cost, I planned on installing an inspection port.

I will have to price the paints, I know one marine store I went to was expensive, the cheapest paint was $40 a pint.
Ports run around $8 - $15 ... ~$25 when you figure in fasteners and a 3oz tube of sealer.

Paint :confused: ...awhile ago you were talking Hot Dogs, now you're shopping for Steaks.



At the butcher's counter...

~$25 to $60 /qt ... $80 to $:eek: /gallon

Fairly typical prices here...
http://www.jamestowndistributors.com

.
 
Thread starter #8
Thanks for your help wayne. I will look around here more for local paint. I don't like buying things over the internet if I don't have to. I don't want expensive, I just want quality that will last a couple years and looks good and will look good if taken care of. I really want to paint it back to the stock colors, but I'd need red and blue. So that's too expensive for such a small area. I need to find a local distrubutor that doesn't charge too much for little things.

I will also look into adding the port when I get money. I really want a storage hole, so maybe I"ll make my own storage bin.
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#9
Thanks for your help wayne. I will look around here more for local paint. I don't like buying things over the internet if I don't have to.
Ya never know, there might have been an outlet right in your town. But, I agree, avoid additional shipping charges when possible. I'm sure in a town Houston's size there's got to be a boat supply house or two. ;)


I don't want expensive, I just want quality that will last a couple years and looks good and will look good if taken care of. I really want to paint it back to the stock colors, but I'd need red and blue.
Here's a thought, by any chance do you have a boat repair shop nearby?

Talk with their paint person and explain you only need what would essentially amount to the bottom of the can from a big job to do the stripes with. Just maybe you'll get a heads-up when they shoot that color and can get the left-overs.

Is there a chance the deck could be buffed out instead of painted, aside from the stripes, that is? I realize, the bottom will still need paint, but that could save you some.

.
 
#10
Given the condition of the boat, the bridle's probably going to snap off at the first hard wind as well. Bridle's run about $30, and are very easy to install. As this is a budget job, you may want to keep a spare twin pack of bungee cords in the well compartment as an alternative option...

Dual racing stripes began in 1973, so this is at least a 1973 or later boat.

By the way, anyone know a ballpark on putting a thin layer of gelcoat on the bottom, as opposed to paint? $90-130?
 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#11
Dual racing stripes began in 1973, so this is at least a 1973 or later boat.
QUOTE]

Agree about the bridle. Rope (aka line) is a cheap substitute for the wire one, and works fine - just get some sturdy, thin line that won't stretch like crazy or wear thru. Line is not legal for racing, but for cruising it is fine and inexpensive.

Regarding the stripes, they were painted on, as the boat is certainly a 1970 or older. It does not have the storage cubby that they added in 1971.

BB
 
#12
Correct - didn't catch that, there's no well compartment here.

This is the first time I've seen someone go out and paint a matching line, which certainly explains why it smeared off like it did.

When you get around to finally sailing, gently, gently undo the gooseneck beforehand, and if there is any corrosion, you may want to wrap it up with electrician's tape, and then gently slide the gooseneck back over the electrician's tape. This too will buy you some time as, given the condition of the boat, the boom will probably snap in two right at the gooseneck area the very first time that you tip over. After all this prep work, it's a real bummer when this happens (and it usually always seems to happen within the first 10 minutes of sailing...)

I think new booms are about $130 these days, and gafs about $180.

Additionally, Annapolis Performance Sailing (APS) also sells some sort of aftermarket pully that looks like it can be installed on the boom in a situation where the pulley has pulled out/rotted out of the boom, and the ensuing pulley hole/slot in now too big to accept a normal replacement part. That aftermarket part is only about $5-6 bucks as well. So keep that in mind as well, as you go about the task of getting the craft seaworthy....

Link: http://www.apsltd.com/c-2385-SunfishThroughBoltKitforBoomEyestrapsBlocks.aspx
 
Thread starter #13
Given the condition of the boat, the bridle's probably going to snap off at the first hard wind as well. Bridle's run about $30, and are very easy to install. As this is a budget job, you may want to keep a spare twin pack of bungee cords in the well compartment as an alternative option...

Dual racing stripes began in 1973, so this is at least a 1973 or later boat.

By the way, anyone know a ballpark on putting a thin layer of gelcoat on the bottom, as opposed to paint? $90-130?

As stated later, it's definantly pre 70's era. Also, the guy I bought it off of has owned it since 67. I think he said he bought it new, but I'll have to verify that when I see him tomorrow. As for the bridle, it's already a piece of rope, and is solid. We used it to move the boat around a little bit. Most of the pieces have been store inside for the past years, only the hull was out in the weather. And the boat was last used three years ago.
 
Thread starter #14
Dual racing stripes began in 1973, so this is at least a 1973 or later boat.
QUOTE]

Agree about the bridle. Rope (aka line) is a cheap substitute for the wire one, and works fine - just get some sturdy, thin line that won't stretch like crazy or wear thru. Line is not legal for racing, but for cruising it is fine and inexpensive.

Regarding the stripes, they were painted on, as the boat is certainly a 1970 or older. It does not have the storage cubby that they added in 1971.

BB

I will use rope/line since this is only recreational, I don't have to follow the standards or rules. I didn't realize the stripes were painted on after the fact, well, if possible, I wouldn't mind repainting them when I get the money since I like the stripes.
 
Thread starter #15
Correct - didn't catch that, there's no well compartment here.

This is the first time I've seen someone go out and paint a matching line, which certainly explains why it smeared off like it did.

When you get around to finally sailing, gently, gently undo the gooseneck beforehand, and if there is any corrosion, you may want to wrap it up with electrician's tape, and then gently slide the gooseneck back over the electrician's tape. This too will buy you some time as, given the condition of the boat, the boom will probably snap in two right at the gooseneck area the very first time that you tip over. After all this prep work, it's a real bummer when this happens (and it usually always seems to happen within the first 10 minutes of sailing...)

I think new booms are about $130 these days, and gafs about $180.

Additionally, Annapolis Performance Sailing (APS) also sells some sort of aftermarket pully that looks like it can be installed on the boom in a situation where the pulley has pulled out/rotted out of the boom, and the ensuing pulley hole/slot in now too big to accept a normal replacement part. That aftermarket part is only about $5-6 bucks as well. So keep that in mind as well, as you go about the task of getting the craft seaworthy....

Link: http://www.apsltd.com/c-2385-SunfishThroughBoltKitforBoomEyestrapsBlocks.aspx

Thanks for the information, I am still new to sailboats, my main area is automotive, but it's nice to learn about sailing also. Luckily I found a diagram of our boat that labels all of the pieces. Otherwise I would not know what a gooseneck was. One of the booms already has electrical tape for where the gooseneck is, the other does not. I have two sets of booms with sails. I may pick up an extra set of booms and mast as there was one being sold here locally for $100. The pulley to raise the sail is still solid, as seen in the pics, it was a windy day when I was testing the sails and the pulleys out. I will be careful this weekend when I test it out though. I plan on sailing right next to the beach, so if something happens, I can jump out and walk it to shore.
 
Thread starter #16
Ya never know, there might have been an outlet right in your town. But, I agree, avoid additional shipping charges when possible. I'm sure in a town Houston's size there's got to be a boat supply house or two. ;)



Here's a thought, by any chance do you have a boat repair shop nearby?

Talk with their paint person and explain you only need what would essentially amount to the bottom of the can from a big job to do the stripes with. Just maybe you'll get a heads-up when they shoot that color and can get the left-overs.

Is there a chance the deck could be buffed out instead of painted, aside from the stripes, that is? I realize, the bottom will still need paint, but that could save you some.

.

I will have to try your advice on getting free or paying less for paint. I also want to avoid shipping charges. I might first try to buff the paint, but ultimateley, I do want to repaint the boat and make it look good again. Thanks for all of the help guys. I'm still a noob at sailing and any advice is greatly appreciated. I have automotive expierience and tools, so i"m not new to fixing things.
 
Thread starter #17
Here is a picture of one of the goosenecks and the electrical tape. I haven't seen my boat since last weekend, but today I'll go to where i'm storing it and check out the areas you guys were talking about.
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#18
I might first try to buff the paint
Hard to tell from the photos, has the deck been painted? You mentioned chalky oxidation so I was thinking is was still the original gelcoat.

Gelcoat is a colored layer of polyester resin (fiberglass resin), formulated for cosmetic appearance and extra UV resistance. It's laid on thick, about 0.020" or roughly the equivalent of 10 layers of auto body paint. For comparison, cars and boats usually get 2 layers of paint, 4 if you include undercoat and clear-coat.

Gelcoat goes on thick for a number of reasons. It's a real talent to apply correctly ... too thick or thin and it cracks ... and it often gets measured in the application process to insure a proper build-up. At the right thickness it provides a good moisture barrier for the fabric reinforced structure beneath it. The extra thickness, greater than the typical paint job, also allows for several good compoundings to rub down to fresh gelcoat should it ever get left unprotected and become oxidized. It's for this reason I was thinking you might still be able to just compound or wet-sand the deck in lieu of painting it.

The stripes on your boat are obviously an owner add-on, seeing how they are paint, not the normal factory gelcoat. A fairly common enhancement to find. I've done it myself to several older Sunfish.
 

Attachments

Thread starter #19
Well it appears that the gelcoat is still there, and that the top may have been painted on. But most of it looks to be gone now. Also, where the rudder attatches, I got the numbers off of the plate there. But I don't think they are for my boat. Here's what the serial plate said: SNAJ78177302.

EDIT: I believe that is the serial off of the Snark Mach II that the rudder was taken from.
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
#20
Well it appears that the gelcoat is still there, and that the top may have been painted on. But most of it looks to be gone now. Also, where the rudder attatches, I got the numbers off of the plate there. But I don't think they are for my boat. Here's what the serial plate said: SNAJ78177302.

EDIT: I believe that is the serial off of the Snark Mach II that the rudder was taken from.
I believe you are right...

SNAJ78177302

SNA ... Mfg ID ( SNARK BOATS - Parent Company: MEYERS BOAT CO INC )
J7817 .... Internal production coding number
73 ... Boat Model Year
02 ... Month Built

... the model year and build month sequence appear to have been erroneously swapped from the legal format, based on, you couldn’t have a month 73. But, that was the first year a USCG Hull ID was required so they may have been confused by the gummit instructions.

I've also seen other brand boats at the beginning of Hull Id's with the number stamped in the upper left of the transom.

So, that confirms the rudder's origin.

.
 
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