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inspection port

water rat

Member
Now that many have helped me realize what I need to do to fix a loose foam block and double check another pice I need to pick ur brains as to what size port inspection port I should install and is it best to install it on the deck or fore and aft in the cockpit. Defender Marine has a 6 inch and 10 inch at really good prices. What I am interested in is the best hole size for correcting problems that may occur. By the way the boat which I thought was an early 80"s is a twin stripe with no HIN plate..which probably puts date of manufacture in the late 60's. The original finish is in very very good condition so I doubt if it was sailed much although the person I bought it from did sail it. Being that old things dry out and need attention.
 
I've used 6" and 4" inspection ports... I can't imagine needing (or wanting!) a 10". I prefer the 6", with one in the middle of the rear deck as far aft as possible, and the other centered in the 'V' between the splash guard and the front of the centerboard trunk. That will allow access to the bridle eyestraps and the gudgeon in the rear, and the main sheet fairlead and cleat, and the centerboard trunk in the front. IMHO this set up gives good ventilation during storage and access to most of the areas that might have issues. You can always add another if needed... the mast step on one of my boats collapsed and I had to add another port between the mast step and the bow handle, but in my experience that's pretty rare.
 
The hole... Incidentally, if you have a specific repair to do, it may be easier to cut the hole the do the repair before you put the port in... gives you a little extra room to maneuver.
 

fhhuber

Member
Yep... cut the hole for the port. do the work. then install the port.
Later if you need a larger access than you can get by popping the port cover you can unscrew the port and gain about 1 inch dia without cutting bigger hole..

Might be a good idea to get the "cat bag" type port. Its just a few bucks more and gives you a good spot to keep a wallet and cell phone (put the cell phone inside a ziplock bag)
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
does the 6 refer to the hole or the entire diameter of the port
Buy the port first, then measure what you have. :cool:

By actual measure, the diameter varies... :eek: among the collection of new/used different ports I've advertised here: Inspection Port Collection... | SailingForums.com
(Even among the various manufacturers of Screw-in / Pop-In inspection ports, they're different)! :confused:

Make the minimal(ist) cut you can make in the deck for installation. As above, don't permanently install whatever port you buy. Put tape around the cut's opening to protect against the rough edges of fiberglass. Seal and install last. :)
 

wjejr

Active Member
I used a 6" port in front of the dagger board to access damage to the keel behind the mast step. I did as the others have suggested and made the repairs before actually mounting the port. That gave me enough room to get my arm in along with the fiberglass tape. To protect the deck I used blue masking tape where the jigsaw would sit when sawing. I traced the circle on that. I started the cutting by drilling a hole large enough for the jigsaw blade. I also use a bag, and would not be without one.

One thing I distinctly remember when I cut out the circle was how humid it was inside the hull. I would have thought the boat would have weighed a ton, but it seemed fine. So as not to have a repeat of that, I always leave the port cover off when not sailing.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Now that many have helped me realize what I need to do to fix a loose foam block and double check another piece I need to pick ur brains as to what size port inspection port I should install and is it best to install it on the deck or fore and aft in the cockpit.
Start with a small inspection port. That, you can always enlarge. ;)

Or keep the deck original, and don't install any, just go through the bottom, where the repair can't readily be seen. Cut away from the (very strong) keel ahead of the daggerboard trunk, enlarge as needed to find any gaps, and to "re-jam" the Styrofoam block back into place.

Proceed as below:
loose block | SailingForums.com
 
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