Hiking strap

Thread starter #37
1) What is your lake bottom and shoreline like? That dolly may dig right into it. It may have been sold through the years through the Alcort or AMF catalogs or Windward Leg Class Association newsletter. It would work well for concentrating the full weight of the boat on a gudgeon that is held on by 4 small screws.

2) Here is one of our blog posts on how to repair resin chips in the daggerboard trunk.

Small Boat Restoration: Daggerboard Trunk Repair and Leak Test

It takes a longer file or sander to reach inside the trunk and file away loose edges of the chip and burr a surface for the epoxy putty to adhere to. We found a long diamond ceramic tile file at Lowes that works great, it is flat on one side and round on the other. We have also used 60 grit sandpaper taped to a paint stick, or the 4 in 1 file to get to the first few inches inside the trunk. Alan has a extension bit for a drill that holds a Dremel sanding drum, the best method.

For your repair Marine Tex epoxy putty (White) would be the easiest route to go, available through Jamestown Distributors.
Marine-Tex Epoxy

Marine-Tex is a high strength epoxy putty that hardens like steel and is sandable like wood. Use it to repair holes, cracks, dents, worn out surfaces and damaged substrates on your boat and beyond. This unique putty bonds and fuses ceramics, fiberglass, plastics, wood, metals, ferro-cement and porcelain.
How hard do you have to file or sand? How do you get the Marine Tex inside the trunk? A stick that you stir paint with? That would work for the flat sides but not the rounded ends. And if you put in too much would the dagger board not fit?
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#38
How hard do you have to file or sand?
-That depends on grit, we use a heavy grit like 40 or 60. The smoother and thinner that you apply epoxy the less you have to sand.

How do you get the Marine Tex inside the trunk? A stick that you stir paint with?
-Yes, split down the middle so it is about finger wide.

That would work for the flat sides but not the rounded ends.
-The narrow stick fits inside the rounded contour. Imagine icing a cake, and dab on a little at a time, barely more than the thickness of the good resin that remains.

And if you put in too much would the dagger board not fit?
-Yes, until you sand it back down.
 
Thread starter #39
How hard do you have to file or sand?
-That depends on grit, we use a heavy grit like 40 or 60. The smoother and thinner that you apply epoxy the less you have to sand.

How do you get the Marine Tex inside the trunk? A stick that you stir paint with?
-Yes, split down the middle so it is about finger wide.

That would work for the flat sides but not the rounded ends.
-The narrow stick fits inside the rounded contour. Imagine icing a cake, and dab on a little at a time, barely more than the thickness of the good resin that remains.

And if you put in too much would the dagger board not fit?
-Yes, until you sand it back down.
What if I use the tile file? That sounds easier than trying to get sand paper on a stick. How hard would I have to do it with that?
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#40
Buy some epoxy putty and play around with it. The putty dries hard, but that is what you want, a structural repair. It will sand away easier with the diamond file or the 4 in 1 file. The 4 in 1 file might be easier to find at your hardware store. Buy a pair of leather gloves or garden gloves.

Emphasis again to not put on excessive material, that way there is no need to file a lot.

2 rasps and 2 file in 1-handheld tool. One side flat, one side rounded. Stanley or Nicholson brands.

download.jpeg
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#41
For the rounded areas, use a discarded broomstick and glue coarse sandpaper tightly around it.

Contact cement would work best, but school glue will do in a pinch.
 
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