Heel to leeward when starting a roll tack?

Thread starter #1
Hi guys, I´ve been reading some books on roll tacks, some of them say that it should start with a leeward heel. I´ve been asking around and I was told that you shouldn't heel to leeward when initating a roll tack because you lose distance to windward. I prefer no to heel to leeward but I would like to hear your thoughts!
 
#3
Indeed, the leeward heel initiates the turn so you dont need as much rudder and more rudder = slower tack exit speed, if you turn the boat slowly using abit of heel and small amounts of rudder you actually do a big arc into windward and gain height. So you come out of the tack higher and with more speed than you would if you just banged the tiller over. This is all seperate from the pump you do, to gain some extra speed (im sorry i mean exit the turn at the same speed you started it ;)). Now this all comes from sailing fireflys, but id imagine it translates to lasers just as well.
 
#5
You do NOT need leeward heel to initiate a roll tack.

It's actually quite slow.

Don't do it.
In light air, it's MUCH faster. It gets you some extra speed because you heeling the boat in 2 directions rather than one, you use less rudder, and you can get roll the boat to leeward more when you tack.

In super light air, I kind of hover my hand over the tiller, and dont move it at all. I let the boat move the rudder.
 

torrid

Just sailing
#6
Hi guys, I´ve been reading some books on roll tacks, some of them say that it should start with a leeward heel. I´ve been asking around and I was told that you shouldn't heel to leeward when initating a roll tack because you lose distance to windward. I prefer no to heel to leeward but I would like to hear your thoughts!


In light air, it's MUCH faster. It gets you some extra speed because you heeling the boat in 2 directions rather than one, you use less rudder, and you can get roll the boat to leeward more when you tack.

In super light air, I kind of hover my hand over the tiller, and dont move it at all. I let the boat move the rudder.
I think it all depends upon the conditions, a trade-off in drag on the rudder vs. lost distance to windward. In light air or flat water, I think drag on the rudder would be a bigger issue. You should heel to windward in that case.

In heavy air or waves, get just a little bit of heel and you'll slide down to windward. Better to just steer it through the tack.
 
#7
In light air, it's MUCH faster. It gets you some extra speed because you heeling the boat in 2 directions rather than one, you use less rudder, and you can get roll the boat to leeward more when you tack.

In super light air, I kind of hover my hand over the tiller, and dont move it at all. I let the boat move the rudder.
Completely disagree.

Your boat will have a natural tendency to round up. You take advantage of that. You should be sailing as close to the wind as the conditions allow, anyway. Using that, along with initiating ever so slightly with the rudder is the way to go.

Once the sail breaks, you pull it over on top of you, then complete the rest.

Why would you heel to leeward and then have to bring the boat back from that heeled position to roll it back on top of yourself.

Either way, I've been taught by some people "in the know" not to heel to leeward.

I'll try and confirm/get better explanation.
 
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