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Got it Home...Now in the "What Did I Get Myself Into" Phase

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
Just want to thank everyone for the helpful tips on getting the boat home. It's here and up on sawhorses. Now to clean it and assess what needs to be done. Not going to lie, I have absolutely no clue what I'm doing, but hopefully I can figure it out and get this thing out on the water by...next...season?

 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
The serial number on the stern indicates that this is a 1980 boat. The price was right, for sure...

After the clean-up (I like Soft Scrub), do a bubble test for leaks.
You should also fill the mast tube with water to see if it leaks.

For the time being, use a stopper/cork for the drain hole in the deck
The bailer in the tub may still be useable.

Others on this forum are expert restorers of boats of this vintage; me, not so much...
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
The serial number on the stern indicates that this is a 1980 boat. The price was right, for sure...

After the clean-up (I like Soft Scrub), do a bubble test for leaks.
You should also fill the mast tube with water to see if it leaks.

For the time being, use a stopper/cork for the drain hole in the deck
The bailer in the tub may still be useable.

Others on this forum are expert restorers of boats of this vintage; me, not so much...
Yeah, I'm definitely the functionality over form type. Doesn't have to be perfect. The thing is older than I am and I'm far from perfect, so I can live with a few beauty marks on it. I just want to make sure I don't take on water.

I looked up the bubble test. What a great idea! I will definitely give that a go this weekend. Thanks for the tips!
 

P-1000

New Member
I’m just here because of your username. Been years since I saw a monkey island reference.

Also, congrats on the new boat and getting her home!
 

tag

my2fish
The small hole in the front of the cockpit is a vent hole - don’t plug it.
Clean it up and inspect the sail and lines. Intensity Sails has very reasonably priced brand new sails that are a worthwhile upgrade.

You could probably sail it as is this season and repair it next off-season.
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
I’m just here because of your username. Been years since I saw a monkey island reference.

Also, congrats on the new boat and getting her home!
I'm selling these fine leather jackets...

Thanks!

The small hole in the front of the cockpit is a vent hole - don’t plug it.
Clean it up and inspect the sail and lines. Intensity Sails has very reasonably priced brand new sails that are a worthwhile upgrade.

You could probably sail it as is this season and repair it next off-season.
Roger that. Trying to dip my toe in the hobby/lifestyle with as little investment as possible just to see if it's for me. Hopefully I can get out there this year and give it a go.
 

Alan S. Glos

Well-Known Member
Hello!

I guess I am sort of Sunfish restoration expert having owned and restored about a hundred of them over the years and I live in nearby Cazenovia, NY .
Give me a call at 315 655-8296 and I would love to drive up and take a look at it. No charge. I think you have scored a winner. The parts alone are worth
several hundred dollars, and 1980 vintage Sunfish were well built. I can see from the video that it was sold by Syracuse Yacht Sales so it is a local boat.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
Hello!

I guess I am sort of Sunfish restoration expert having owned and restored about a hundred of them over the years and I live in nearby Cazenovia, NY .
Give me a call at 315 655-8296 and I would love to drive up and take a look at it. No charge. I think you have scored a winner. The parts alone are worth
several hundred dollars, and 1980 vintage Sunfish were well built. I can see from the video that it was sold by Syracuse Yacht Sales so it is a local boat.

Alan Glos
Cazenovia, NY
Hi Alan! Yeah, Cazenovia! Not too far. I hope to be cleaning her up this weekend. I'll give you a shout and see if you want to stop out. No biggie if you have other plans, we can definitely raincheck it. Hope to speak with you in the near future!
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Definitely a good buy, and you can trust advice from Alan Glos.

That inspection port in the cockpit is an odd one, as there's only an inch of space behind it! :oops: I suspect it was installed to make a professionally-finished repair to a puncture in the side.

The original finish to the fiberglass construction is called gelcoat. It's a hard, thin—but fragile—coating to the deck and hull surfaces.

The fine fractures near the rear stripe suggest someone's hard fall on the deck. I wouldn't bother with a repair, as it's difficult to match colors; likewise, the cracked red splash guard. That splash guard through-fracture and abrasions can wait for next season.

External damage to the bailer could result in imminent loss of the check-ball. That's a good reason to repair the abrasion and buying some Thixo. (Check for compatibility).

The threaded hole on the top-right deck is the drain. A hardware store "set-screw" in stainless steel—wrapped in Teflon tape—will close it up for now. A stock replacement is costly.

Use very little pressure in the pressure test. (Tape over the vent hole, and use the drain—or vice-versa). Someone suggested that "lung power" is enough! What does that amount to? One or two PSI? :confused:

While awaiting your pressure test results, it appears all you're "short of" is a few paint brushes! ;)
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
Definitely a good buy, and you can trust advice from Alan Glos.

That inspection port in the cockpit is an odd one, as there's only an inch of space behind it! :oops: I suspect it was installed to make a professionally-finished repair to a puncture in the side.

The original finish to the fiberglass construction is called gelcoat. It's a hard, thin—but fragile—coating to the deck and hull surfaces.

The fine fractures near the rear stripe suggest someone's hard fall on the deck. I wouldn't bother with a repair, as it's difficult to match colors; likewise, the cracked red splash guard. That splash guard through-fracture and abrasions can wait for next season.

External damage to the bailer could result in imminent loss of the check-ball. That's a good reason to repair the abrasion and buying some Thixo. (Check for compatibility).

The threaded hole on the top-right deck is the drain. A hardware store "set-screw" in stainless steel—wrapped in Teflon tape—will close it up for now. A stock replacement is costly.

Use very little pressure in the pressure test. (Tape over the vent hole, and use the drain—or vice-versa). Someone suggested that "lung power" is enough! What does that amount to? One or two PSI? :confused:

While awaiting your pressure test results, it appears all you're "short of" is a few paint brushes! ;)
I like the sound of that. Do you know what size threading I need for the drain? I google'd it but didn't come up with too much that didn't produce a dead link.
 

Breeze Bender

Breeze Bender
All good advice above. Don’t cover that cockpit vent hole! You got a steal for $100. The rudder alone is worth $150-200 and is the preferred “new style”.
Hope he had it stored upside down outdoors or that missing drain plug will have caused a weight problem. Were you able to get the boat on sawhorses by yourself? If so you’re probably within range (125-135 lbs or so)
Don’t worry about paint. Once you give it a good washing and maybe some rubbing compound and wax it will shine right up. Peel or sand off any loose or sloppy repairs. The leak test will tell you where you stand from there (and the only time you DO cover vent hole if using the open deck drain to blow air into hull)
Splashguard can be repaired easily and painted to look like new. Replacing it is very expensive and shipping is crazy because of shape.
Let’s see the sail- maybe not as bad as owner suggested?
You can definitely get out on the water this summer! Nice find!
 

ILCA 80 s

New Member
I to have acquired a boat and needs lots of work so will be lurking here ,my boat was free ,the guy even dropped it off for me . I have nothing but the bare bones boat shell ,said he would bring sail but nothing yet ,fingers crossed. You are ahead of me you have sail ,rudder ,Center Board , ect .
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
All good advice above. Don’t cover that cockpit vent hole! You got a steal for $100. The rudder alone is worth $150-200 and is the preferred “new style”.
Hope he had it stored upside down outdoors or that missing drain plug will have caused a weight problem. Were you able to get the boat on sawhorses by yourself? If so you’re probably within range (125-135 lbs or so)
Don’t worry about paint. Once you give it a good washing and maybe some rubbing compound and wax it will shine right up. Peel or sand off any loose or sloppy repairs. The leak test will tell you where you stand from there (and the only time you DO cover vent hole if using the open deck drain to blow air into hull)
Splashguard can be repaired easily and painted to look like new. Replacing it is very expensive and shipping is crazy because of shape.
Let’s see the sail- maybe not as bad as owner suggested?
You can definitely get out on the water this summer! Nice find!
Thanks! He kept it stored cockpit side down for that very reason, so I was able to kinda sorta move it myself. lol there’s a little moisture inside but not so much to worry me. Any specific rubbing compound and wax I should use for a boat, or would the same stuff I’d use on a car suffice?

I will bust out the sail and see what’s doing and report back. It would be cool if the sail was usable, even if I had to patch it a bit. It would be nice to see if I enjoy sailing it before dropping $200+ on a new sail.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Nothing there that can't be fixed... you can temporarily tape some of it just to go for a sea trial. That cr@p hanging off the hull looks like a misguided repair effort, some of it may just be peeling paint. Either way, you wanna scrape that off, maybe tape any underlying cracks until you figure out whether you want to actually make permanent repairs. That moisture you felt inside the hull may be due to condensation: proper storage and ventilation (i.e. inspection ports) will solve that problem. Meh, pretty good deal for a C-note... I'd say get those blades varnished, temporarily tape up the worst cracks, and go for a sea trial to see whether you're into sailing. Some folks get seasick, and such motion sickness is about the only reason I can see for NOT liking the sport of sailing. If you're susceptible to motion sickness, you should already know... worst-case scenario, you can probably double your money just by cleaning up the boat, lol. If you find that you enjoy sailing (as most folks do), then you can start making permanent repairs. That's my $.02, be sure to read up on the "Rules of the Road" prior to your first voyage, and don't forget a PFD (required by law in most states). Ya don't have to wear it as an adult, but it has to be aboard. Last thing ya want is some cheesy ticket to sour your first voyage... :rolleyes:
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
Nothing there that can't be fixed... you can temporarily tape some of it just to go for a sea trial. That cr@p hanging off the hull looks like a misguided repair effort, some of it may just be peeling paint. Either way, you wanna scrape that off, maybe tape any underlying cracks until you figure out whether you want to actually make permanent repairs. That moisture you felt inside the hull may be due to condensation: proper storage and ventilation (i.e. inspection ports) will solve that problem. Meh, pretty good deal for a C-note... I'd say get those blades varnished, temporarily tape up the worst cracks, and go for a sea trial to see whether you're into sailing. Some folks get seasick, and such motion sickness is about the only reason I can see for NOT liking the sport of sailing. If you're susceptible to motion sickness, you should already know... worst-case scenario, you can probably double your money just by cleaning up the boat, lol. If you find that you enjoy sailing (as most folks do), then you can start making permanent repairs. That's my $.02, be sure to read up on the "Rules of the Road" prior to your first voyage, and don't forget a PFD (required by law in most states). Ya don't have to wear it as an adult, but it has to be aboard. Last thing ya want is some cheesy ticket to sour your first voyage... :rolleyes:
That all sounds like excellent advice. So far I have 30 hours in eSail and I’m halfway through sailing for dummies, plus countless YouTube videos on the subject. That’s about the extent of my experience. What O have in my head could be completely different from what actual sailing is like, so I’m trying to temper my expectations.

The repairs do seem dodgy. They’re soft to the touch so I’m not entirely sure what they’re all about, but I’m sure Alan can shed some light on them when he stops by.

Opened up the sails. Definitely more than a few holes and a broken clip here and there, but the mast and spars look decent. If I could get one or two sails out of it, I’d be happy, but I have my doubts. I’ve attached photos. What do you think?
 

Attachments

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
Oh, and motion sickness has never been an issue for me. I’ve been on a few large tour boats and a seal kayak before and didn’t have any issues, so I think I’ll be ok in that regard!
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Yup. Faded Sunfish logo and familiar colors.

Camp_ShorefrontPorpoise_Tyler-001.jpg

I had the same "soft" sail, which made it easy to close up or wrap on the spars. I used a discarded white vinyl roof gutter with bungees to keep it from filling when ashore.

For about $9, sail repair tape can fix those defects. Gorilla makes a cheaper 2" wide clear tape, about double or triple the thickness of regular packaging tape.

That'll get you out on the water. ;)
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
Yup. Faded Sunfish logo and familiar colors.

View attachment 45123

I had the same "soft" sail, which made it easy to close up or wrap on the spars. I used a discarded white vinyl roof gutter with bungees to keep it from filling when ashore.

For about $9, sail repair tape can fix those defects. Gorilla makes a cheaper 2" wide clear tape, about double or triple the thickness of regular packaging tape.

That'll get you out on the water. ;)
Awesome! Just has to hold for one or two trips. I will pick up some of that tape.

So my plan is:

1. Refinish the daggerboard and rudder (need to figure out what type of varnish and epoxy to use)
2. Tape up the sail.
3. Buy some replacement clips.
4. Find a cheap trailer (plus receiver for my car).
5. Find a cheap dolly.
6. Clean boat.
7. Do bubble test.
8. Go sailing.
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Sail looks rotten... a blowout waiting to happen. Better to splurge and buy a new sail, especially since you aren't affected by motion sickness. You don't want your first sailing voyage to turn into a "nautical epic" with tattered main, boat sliding toward Niagara Falls, etc., etc. :confused:

You'll want to inspect all lines as well, if the sail is that bad then the lines may be rotten too... think of it as a marine safety issue. The cash layout is worth the overall peace of mind. ;)

Sounds like you'll take to sailing no problem, so think about making those permanent repairs ASAP... the sooner, the better, but you can still go on a sea trial with those cracks taped up, any broad waterproof tape will work for the purpose. Some of the cracks look cosmetic anyway, just spider cracks in gelcoat. :rolleyes:

Good on ya for learning as much as you can PRIOR to your first voyage... hmm, L&VW just posted a different opinion, maybe you can tape up the sail for your sea trial, but I still recommend a new sail pronto. Might consider a collapsible paddle if you're gonna use the old mainsail. Just sayin'... :cool:

P.S. Wash the sail with gentle detergent like Woolite, delicate cycle in a large machine (laundromat, maybe), and air dry... that way you can better see the damage and keep all that dirt from further eroding the fibers. :D
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Set the boat on its side on a scale, 139 pounds is the target.

Air Leak Test tips: https://www.youtube.com/user/kentblairl/search?query=air leak

The peely stuff is probably failed sealant, an improper repair. If you see more sealant under the deck/hull flange there were probably leaks there in the seam.

A good cleaning of the sail is in order, Dawn dishwashing liquid and light brushing with a broom, lay out to air dry.

Sailrite adhesive backed sail repair tape can secure those holes, and hopefully the sail is not dry rotted. Otherwise there are used and new sails for sail, here in the Forum or ebay or Laser Performance Dealers.

Nice find.
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
It's a good point. If I go out with this sail, I may save money, but I might also be setting myself up for failure. For my first time out I should probably make sure I give myself the best chance at success. Maybe I'll start poking around and see if I can find a used sail or something just to get me out there. I'm as green as it gets and even I don't really trust this sail, tape or no tape.

The lines seem ok, but then again, I'm hardly an expert on the subject and do I want to take a chance on it? Hardly.
 

tag

my2fish
You'd benefit from starting on a day with a gentle breeze to light winds. Enough to move you around on the water and get a feel for the sail and rudder movements, and not too risky that you should have to worry about the sail or lines. That'll give you a better idea of how much you like it and how much time/money you'll be okay with spending to get it in better sailing condition.

I'd tweak your list like this:
1. Clean boat.
2. Tape up the sail.
3. Go sailing.

Then worry about the other stuff.
 

Sailflow

Active Member
Put some type.of wind indicator on to reference the wind. It can be a piece of cassette tape tied to a sail clip in front of the first pulley.
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
You'd benefit from starting on a day with a gentle breeze to light winds. Enough to move you around on the water and get a feel for the sail and rudder movements, and not too risky that you should have to worry about the sail or lines. That'll give you a better idea of how much you like it and how much time/money you'll be okay with spending to get it in better sailing condition.

I'd tweak your list like this:
1. Clean boat.
2. Tape up the sail.
3. Go sailing.

Then worry about the other stuff.
A gambling man. I like it! Still, to get it to the water I'll need to get myself a trailer at the very least, and maybe a dolly if I value my back. And I should probably not run a raw daggerboard and a flaking rudder. Just have to find a marine store and pick up the epoxy and varnish. Still, I am itching to get this thing out on the water, so perhaps I'll just say "send it" and go for it.

Put some type.of wind indicator on to reference the wind. It can be a piece of cassette tape tied to a sail clip in front of the first pulley.
Oh yeah, tell tails are definitely in my future. eSail has made me reliant on them. I've been practicing trying to tell where the wind is coming from just using my senses and I'm terrible at it.


I have a sneaking suspicion that I have a busy weekend ahead of me. :)
 

tag

my2fish
This is my simple PVC pipe dolly design:
1618362507286.png

I go into details and have a .pdf of plans you can download (free) at my Sunfish sailing blog here:

I later added a PVC pipe handle, but you don't need it.
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
This is my simple PVC pipe dolly design:
View attachment 45127

I go into details and have a .pdf of plans you can download (free) at my Sunfish sailing blog here:

I later added a PVC pipe handle, but you don't need it.
Saw that in my research. I like the idea but it kinda confuses me. Seems crazy that a boat so large could fit on such a small dolly. Most of the ones I've seen have a handle. Do you just get the boat on it and move it around with the handle at the bow of the boat?
 

tag

my2fish
yes, that's how I did it previously. works just fine.

I've since added the handle.
1618362894012.png

Plans for the handle (.pdf file) are here:
 

Guybrush3pwood

Active Member
yes, that's how I did it previously. works just fine.

I've since added the handle.
View attachment 45128

Plans for the handle (.pdf file) are here:
That looks so awesome but I fear I lack the skills to build such things unless there's a step by step video that holds my hand through the entire thing. I'll keep mulling it over though. Sure beats dropping $300 on one.
 
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