First time on the water

Thread starter #21
That's awesome, congratulations on the sail!

STOP! Be very careful with that bridle eyestrap. Leave the one screw in and probe around the other hole with a paper clip to see if there are any remnants of a wooden backer block in there. If there is you may be able to go one screw size bigger, and put toothpicks in the hole with waterproof glue. Or fill the reamed out hole with thickened epoxy and set the screw into that when it dries. If the backer block is gone then you'll need to put in the inspection port or split the seam to replace the blocks. If you put in a port you'll need to chisel away part of the internal foam blocks to get to the wooden blocks, the little bit you take out will not be enough to cause concern.

For the halyard we simply wrap the spar 3 times and tie 2 half hitches. Hasn't come loose yet, easy to tie. Recommended hitch is the clove hitch, which I can't remember how to tie :)

We enjoy swivel cam cleats on all of our boats but we do not race.

Use you mirrors to help out while backing. If you can see your trailer in either mirror, it is starting to get crooked.
Thanks, I will try to find it. I have my doubts I can find it.

I'll give the knot a try, actually my son will.

Swivel cleat is in now.

BTW, I bought your book and my son and I enjoyed the pictures and commentary.
 

leob1

New Member
#23
These things will change you life: trailer balls
Before I had the backup camera, I used these to back up to the trailer.
And I put the on the trailer before I backed the empty trailer down the ramp.
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
#25
He should be able to put his toes under the opposite side of the cockpit. I would wear sneakers or boots. Works well, old sunfish have really strong cockpit lips, we all did this before hiking straps were legal.
Only works if you have long legs. I was never able to hike comfortably by doing that.
 
Thread starter #27
That's awesome, congratulations on the sail!

STOP! Be very careful with that bridle eyestrap. Leave the one screw in and probe around the other hole with a paper clip to see if there are any remnants of a wooden backer block in there. If there is you may be able to go one screw size bigger, and put toothpicks in the hole with waterproof glue. Or fill the reamed out hole with thickened epoxy and set the screw into that when it dries. If the backer block is gone then you'll need to put in the inspection port or split the seam to replace the blocks. If you put in a port you'll need to chisel away part of the internal foam blocks to get to the wooden blocks, the little bit you take out will not be enough to cause concern.
No luck on having the wood backer block. So I guess I will be putting in the inspection port right in front of the rudder attachment and working my way to the hole. What kind and size wood should I use?
 

mixmkr

Active Member
#28
If you can reach it, maybe thru bolt it with some larger fender washers. I epoxied an aluminum plate and tapped a screw into that.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#29
Make sure to leave room for the outer ring of the port when cutting that hole. Most likely you will trim off some of the backer block for the horizontal hinge plate when you go in there. And maybe hit a blob of excessive expanding foam. Check out our blog post if you don't have our Manual.

For wood backer blocks we have used mahogany, oak or cypress. The challenge with the oak or mahogany is predrilling to make sure they do not split. We prefer cypress or even pine and put a coat of epoxy on the block, and glue the block in place with epoxy.

There is a slim chance you will find the old block and it will be good enough to reuse, with hole drilled in a different spot or filled with epoxy. The block remnants might be captured in the expanding foam or rattling around inside the hull. We have been able to lift the bow of a boat and get the blocks to slide aft, where we could remove them, but pad the rudder fittings on the transom before lifting the boat.
 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#30
I don't know if Signal Charlie likes this idea, but member Light and Variable Winds has recommended using sections of a reasonably thick polyethylene cutting board as a backer. Instead of driving a wood screw into it, you through bolt it with a nut and washer inside the hull. I think that sounds like a good idea - it will never rot!!
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#31
There are some PVC materials at Lowes and Home Depot that might make good backer plates, with marine grade stainless hardware. I haven't tried them with wood screws.
 
#33
While you have the bridle apart you could switch to the two loop which spreads the load between both straps. If you do switch only undo one screw on the strap and other screw holds the block.
 
#34
Swivel cleat is in now.
Have your son be careful with the swivel cleat the first few times out. Even on a little boat like the Sunfish, once the boat starts tipping, if the sheet is cleated it can be hard to uncleat.

Back when I was designing the Stars and Stripes catamaran, I had the idea of using a swivel cleat. Before installing it on S and S, I tried it out on a Hobie Cat. Here is a shot from a helicopter of me unable to get the sheet uncleated! I had the remaining negatives destroyed, but suffice it to say the end result wasn’t pretty. Then and there I decided no swivel cleat for Stars and Stripes! 973D6924-447C-492F-8CCB-EAD58F4940D7.jpeg
 
Thread starter #35
Have your son be careful with the swivel cleat the first few times out. Even on a little boat like the Sunfish, once the boat starts tipping, if the sheet is cleated it can be hard to uncleat.

Back when I was designing the Stars and Stripes catamaran, I had the idea of using a swivel cleat. Before installing it on S and S, I tried it out on a Hobie Cat. Here is a shot from a helicopter of me unable to get the sheet uncleated! I had the remaining negatives destroyed, but suffice it to say the end result wasn’t pretty. Then and there I decided no swivel cleat for Stars and Stripes! View attachment 30330
Will do, all the sunfishes he learned on had a swivel cleat so it feels natural for him now.
 
#37
When I learn people how to sail (inland water, 6m/20ft keelboat), the first thing I tell them to ignore the swivel cleat. Lots of rental boats use these swivel cleats and people who rent them are often 'caught' by the effect of a wind gust in combination with the swivel cleat.
 
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