First crappy day and I'm ready to move

Merrily

Administrator
Thread starter #21
How much would that indoor storage cost in Orange County if it wasn't in your parents' house? ;)
Don't get started, boys. Merrily is trying to figure out where to move to, and I'm serious about moving. SoCal is out of the question, so no need for any responses from there. :rolleyes:

The East and Gulf Coasts are what we are interested in. I do frostbiting if I have to, but it's not my preference.
 
#22
France ? Great weather (sunny but not too hot, reliable, long summers), good culture. Decent work/life balance (well maybe biased a bit to the life side and less so on the work side). Cheap property, crumbling economy ...

I'd better stop here are I understand political comment is not allowed on the forum.

Ian
 
#24
Mon mari ne parle pas le francais. Mine's not so great either.
But it either of you is almost certainly better than me at it. I have a little cheat sheet with what to shout at marks, in luffing matches, etc. Getting there but its a long slow process.

You would manage fine (and would be welcomed).

Ian
 

Merrily

Administrator
Thread starter #25
But it either of you is almost certainly better than me at it. I have a little cheat sheet with what to shout at marks, in luffing matches, etc. Getting there but its a long slow process.

You would manage fine (and would be welcomed).

Ian
:) So how do you tell someone to head up in French or demand rights at the mark? We haven't officially set English as our language at the club races. Maybe I'll be a pain :rolleyes:. For those of you who already think that I am--c'est la vie.
 
#26
:) So how do you tell someone to head up in French or demand rights at the mark? We haven't officially set English as our language at the club races. Maybe I'll be a pain :rolleyes:. For those of you who already think that I am--c'est la vie.
Head Up = Au lof
Water at a mark = De l'eau

Not yet managed to find out what a hail to get somebody to resume their proper course would be though.

(or so I'm told). Its waving both hands around in the air and trying to keep control of the boat that gets amusing (which I have seen done)

Ian
 

Merrily

Administrator
Thread starter #27
Head Up = Au lof
Water at a mark = De l'eau

Not yet managed to find out what a hail to get somebody to resume their proper course would be though.

(or so I'm told). Its waving both hands around in the air and trying to keep control of the boat that gets amusing (which I have seen done)

Ian
How about Starboard!?
 
#28
hey i live right down here in Fairhope, AL. We hosted sunfish nationals this past summer and are in the proccess f getting a new club. There alot of land for sail down here right now and i have large boat collection in my yard right now. this is a great place (if your into the small town kind of thing). theres mobile across the bay with a couple of yacht clubs if that is more appealing but it wou;ld be nice to get some new sailors down here. let me know if there is any way i can help you out.

Nick Dees
 
#31
A French person - great. What would you shout to get somebody to stay/return to their proper course i.e. when somebody is sailing above or below their "proper course" and getting in your way. e.g. when you sail close to leeward of them and they bear away to block you or they luff beyond their proper course when they have no such right. In English I would call "Proper Course" but have not yet been able to find what would be called in French.

(Also, if the ones I gave above are wrong or there are better alternatives, please do correct me as my French language skills are (very) limited).

Merrily - I think we have now established you can move to France and we are now just mopping up the details (and sorry for hijacking the thread).

Ian
 
#32
A French person - great. What would you shout to get somebody to stay/return to their proper course
Doh!:eek:
I don't know. Next time, I'll try "waving both hands around in the air" ;)
(Also, if the ones I gave above are wrong or there are better alternatives, please do correct me as my French language skills are (very) limited).
They are perfectly right.

Merrily, you're welcome!
 
#33
Doh!:eek:
I don't know. Next time, I'll try "waving both hands around in the air" ;)
(Just in case you thought I was) I was not being nasty - but its something that happened the other week. A trivial incident, lots of shouting and arm waving and the boat in the right lost out massively to everybody as they spent some time just out of control going all over the place.

(I tend to poke more fun at the British that other nationalities and happily accept people poking fun at me or my "Britishness" - which happens but all in good humour).

Ian
 
#34

Merrily

Administrator
Thread starter #35
So now we have established Merrily is moving to France, we have to sort out the area. Do you prefer lots of wind or things being a bit more peaceful ? Do you prefer sea or lakes, coast or inland ? With your new boat I'm guessing somewhere up round the Quiberon/Gulf of Morbihan might suit you nicely. http://www.robinbarkerphotography.com/gallery_11586.html or http://www.robinbarkerphotography.com/gallery_11586.html

(Its OK, I don't live round that part of the world)


Ian
As far as I know, I would still have to pay US taxes if I moved to another country. Does anyone know anything about this? Not into being taxed twice. :(

Other than that, France would be lovely.
 
#36
As far as I know, I would still have to pay US taxes if I moved to another country. Does anyone know anything about this? Not into being taxed twice. :(

Other than that, France would be lovely.
I doubt that. If you become a French resident you would be liable for French taxes. Only complication is if you had income in the US. After 4 years I have just about managed to extract myself from the UK tax system. Despite the issues I have not paid tax twice on the same money (once the UK get round to refunding me tax they are not due to have collected). There are actually quite a few US nationals living in France. Plus, I believe there is a double taxation treaty between France and the US (i.e. you don't get taxed on the same money twice) - started in 1978 and amended 2004.

You are running out of excuses.

Ian
 
#37
As far as I know, I would still have to pay US taxes if I moved to another country. Does anyone know anything about this? Not into being taxed twice. :(

Other than that, France would be lovely.
The rules are tricky and depend on where the income comes from. You would need a good accountant/tax attorney to figure it out. The general rule is that as a US citizen you always pay US taxes. However, you may end up with some credits for taxes paid in France.
 
#38
The double taxation would mean that if you paid tax in the US on money would would not them be liable for tax on the same money in France.


Anyway, double taxation means you don't pay it twice. In fact, the US has relinquished some of its right to tax its citizens who are legally resident in France. In those areas where it has not relinquished taxation rights, France has agreed not to tax the money. Thus, for example, a US citizen resident in France and getting income from land in the US would be taxed on that income in the US and not in France. However, income from interest, dividends, etc. in the US would not be taxed in the US but would be taxed in France. Accountants to manage that are not expensive if your financial matters are not to complex. http://www.info-france-usa.org/intheus/tax/004us.asp

I get a French accountant to do my tac returns in France (as I stand no hope of understanding them) - and he charges very little and normally saves me more than he charges. e.g. just got my CSG bill and he then re-submitted my income tax and with an allowed credit saving me more than twice his bill.

Ian
 
#39
The double taxation would mean that if you paid tax in the US on money would would not them be liable for tax on the same money in France.


Anyway, double taxation means you don't pay it twice. In fact, the US has relinquished some of its right to tax its citizens who are legally resident in France. In those areas where it has not relinquished taxation rights, France has agreed not to tax the money. Thus, for example, a US citizen resident in France and getting income from land in the US would be taxed on that income in the US and not in France. However, income from interest, dividends, etc. in the US would not be taxed in the US but would be taxed in France. Accountants to manage that are not expensive if your financial matters are not to complex. http://www.info-france-usa.org/intheus/tax/004us.asp

I get a French accountant to do my tac returns in France (as I stand no hope of understanding them) - and he charges very little and normally saves me more than he charges. e.g. just got my CSG bill and he then re-submitted my income tax and with an allowed credit saving me more than twice his bill.

Ian
I imagine that the goal for a US resident would be to try to keep as much income a possible taxed by the US which I assume would be a lower rate.
 

Merrily

Administrator
Thread starter #40
I imagine that the goal for a US resident would be to try to keep as much income a possible taxed by the US which I assume would be a lower rate.
That makes sense.

Thing is, our taxes are complicated. I won't go into it, but my income is from royalties. Hope even more so in future. :D
 
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