Family daysailer vs 2nd Sunfish

#21
Maybe not the correct venue here, but I have a '77 Daysailer II in very good condition for sale. PM me if anyone is interested. I'm in the Nashville area.
 
#24
I currently have four Sunfish and a Daysailer II. After a short stint with an FJ, I graduated to a Mutineer, which we sailed for about ten years and loved(built by Chrysler,it is 15', and maybe what you're looking at?? similar to a Bandit - same designer(s) I believe). A Mariner was our next boat, 19', bult by O'Day, same hull as a Rhodes 19, but more of a small cruiser than a Daysailer. We couldn't keep it in the water, and although we could keep the standing rigging up all summer, it was a bear to launch by yourself in heavy wind. We then 'downsized' to the O'Day Daysailer and find it perfect for our needs. Very comfy for four adults and a couple kids, stable, relatively cheap, easy to get parts, nice cuddy for storage, and the big one for my wife.... NO ducking the boom when tacking (unlike the Mutineer). Really not much downside IMHO.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#25
Cyane and OnKaHyE.jpg I'll pile on the SF/Daysailer combo crowd here. We used to joke that we needed one foot of boat for each knot of wind, and we had different boats from a R/C boat up to a Catalina 22. Lots of support for the Daysailer still, the DSII and III are supposed to have positive flotation. If you think you might find a group and race, double check, but I believe the DSIII is not a "class legal" boat for racing in sanctioned events.
The DS is a nice boat, you do have to keep an eye on it with its rolled chine. We sail ours with a slightly smaller main. It is easy to launch and retrieve, and has a good size cockpit for a small family.
The boat we enjoy the most for taking out the family or first time sailors is our 1980 Drascombe Lugger, 18'9" gaff rigged yawl built in Devon, England. Broad beam, very stable. No boom on the main at all. They can be found around the US periodically. ANd if you get bored you can try to sail one around the world like Webb Chiles did in the 70s.
 

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#26
Signal Charlie is correct that the Day Sailer III is not "class legal" for racing with other Day Sailers. They are still good boats. The reason they are not class legal is because, like the Sunfish, the Day Sailer is a "One Design" class boat. With the Day Sailer III O'Day changed the hull configuration giving it more freeboard and changing other specifications. The DSIII was made for only a few years.

Besides my 1976 Day Sailer II and the late 60's Sunfish I am restoring, I also have a 1973 O'Day Mariner, a 1963 O'Day Rhodes 19 that is being restored, and a little 12.5' catboat that is a 1952 Beetle Boat 'Swan' that needs to be restored. The DSII is easier to set up and launch than the Mariner. The Mariner and the Rhodes 19 are both still in production just like the Day Sailer. All three have been in continuous production for over 50 years, just like the Sunfish has been in production for over 50 years.

John
 

Bman

New Member
#27
Just purchased the daysailer as a second boat (sailboat anyway). (2 years after posting!). It is a Mariner 17', a British knock off of an O'Day. Nice and wide, perfect for 2-6 adults. However, what a pain to rig as compared to the sunfish. I see why so many daysailers on my lake are only used a couple of times a year.
 

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#28
Most small day sailers are basically dinghies and can be tender and easy to capsize ... more stable larger boats are haevy and harder to rig, launch and recover. I have owned several day sailers .. all with small cabins for shelter ... West Wight Potters 15 and 19 and a Compac 16 presently .. all great boats, but rigging can be realistically 30 minutes or more. The Compac is virtually impossible to capsize ?? also would be very difficult to "right" if it ever did. All three needed a motor for backup. I started sailing a Sunfish this year and love it for all the reasons you know!! If you gotta have one .... buy a cheapie and store it where you can keep it rigged or it will sit like all those others you see.

ChuckO'
Charleston, SC
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#29
Congrats, beautiful boat! Our Daysailer is fun to sail, you can get a nice slow sail or sporty surfing. What I am having to learn is gauging when to stow/furl the jib, reef the main etc...and on the relativity scale it is much easier to rig than the Capri 18 or Catalina 22 we fiddled with in the past.
 
#30
I got a Vagabond 14... a light daysailer with appx 260 lb hull, and uses standing rigging which does add to the time needed to step the mast and prep to sail.

But I've found that I can leave the side stays connected and do a couple of other things to reduce time to rig each trip to the lake. It just requires some thought and bungees to keep the lines in order while its on the trailer.

I'm now taking maybe 5 min more to rig the Vagabond than it takes me to rig a Sunfish and that's mainly because of the second sail and needing to connect all of the clips to the fore-stay.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#31
The II's and III's are classified as self righting and have self bailing cockpits (same bailer as Sunfish).
I've been thinking of buying a Day Sailer, as my family prefers a larger boat than Sunfish/Laser. Assuming that the bailer can be removed temporarily—and—for those of us who store their boats with the standing-rigging up, where in the cockpit is the bailer located?
 
#32
I've been thinking of buying a Day Sailer, as my family prefers a larger boat than Sunfish/Laser. Assuming that the bailer can be removed temporarily—and—for those of us who store their boats with the standing-rigging up, where in the cockpit is the bailer located?
The bailer location varies sometimes, but usally it will be at the transom of a daysailer
Vagabond its center of the transom, and the hole is just above the water line. A standard small boat drain plug fits but usually you can just leave it open.

Some boats have huge cut outs in the transom to let the water out rapidly when you have it come over the side due to heeling over.
 
#34
I am surprised that no one mentioned the Capri 14 or its predecessor the Omega 14. This is a great boat for 2 to 4 people and it weighs a lot less than the O'Day Daysailer. This boat in all its variations has been made by Catalina for many years and is still in production. Repair parts when and if needed are available. Check the Capri 14 Forum at this web site.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#36
Some boats have huge cut outs in the transom to let the water out rapidly when you have it come over the side due to heeling over.
One of those was the "505" class—back when I was looking for a faster boat—it really impressed me! Hard to believe it's a 60-year-old design...

 

Bman

New Member
#37
Just purchased the daysailer as a second boat (sailboat anyway). (2 years after posting!). It is a Mariner 17', a British knock off of an O'Day. Nice and wide, perfect for 2-6 adults. However, what a pain to rig as compared to the sunfish. I see why so many daysailers on my lake are only used a couple of times a year.
I only sailed the daysailer last year, probably since it was new to me. This year its definitely the fish's turn as I can wait to be closer to the water. Kind of like choosing between a sports car and an SUV. As an aside, I just inherited a 42 foot catamaran, for real!!! Slept on it the other night.
 

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