Even the Laser is not immune

torrid

Just sailing
#62
are olimpic races bigger than world champ races
I have read (keep in mind just read) that Olympic races are slightly easier than world championships. There is a limit of one boat per country, so much of the potential competition is eliminated at the national trials level. Regardless, anybody who medals at the Olympics has to be a pretty darn good sailor.
 
R

Ross B

Guest
#63
I have a feeling that WC races and Olympic races are pretty freakin hard no matter what lol

as to how long ( distance sailed) the individual races are, I don't know
 
#64
Like ditching the Sunfish-style mainsheet system in favor of mid-boom sheeting with a real traveler mounted just behind the daggerboard trunk? And maybe some non-garbage blocks to go with it?
 
#65
Not sure how this fits in the thread but you can't just fit a traveller the boom just wouldn't take the increased load and the sail shape would alter on a windy beat with the inevitable increase bend in the boom even with a super stiff carbon spar. Huge cost implication for tiny gains - Finn?
 
#67
You're correct GBR. I was replying (with tongue in cheek a bit) to a post by Ross B in which he spoke of "other improvements he was thinking of". Now I can't find that post or the thread it was part of. Sorry. I shouldn't post when I'm half asleep.
 
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Ross B

Guest
#69
I've though of doing a center traveler, it can be done.

It would be nice to have a track traveler like the Europe or Finn, which would be best. But the easiest, least amount of modifications way would be to do a Y Bridle, like on 420's and other small dinghies, just need to drill a small hole on each side before the cockpit grab rails, add a block, and your good to go. Might need to tie a backing plate to the end inside of the hull for support, but thats it.

And I do beleive it would work, the mast and boom should be strong enough
 
#70
I've though of doing a center traveler, it can be done.

It would be nice to have a track traveler like the Europe or Finn, which would be best. But the easiest, least amount of modifications way would be to do a Y Bridle, like on 420's and other small dinghies, just need to drill a small hole on each side before the cockpit grab rails, add a block, and your good to go. Might need to tie a backing plate to the end inside of the hull for support, but thats it.

And I do beleive it would work, the mast and boom should be strong enough
A Y bridle on the boom would probably spread out the load on the boom enough to stop it from bending...but good luck tacking without strangling yourself! Not sure why you'd need holes in the deck though. Are you talking about a bridle across the front of the cockpit instead of a traveller?
 
R

Ross B

Guest
#71
yes, across the front of the cockpit, so it would be just infront of the boom block, so you would never strangle yourself, and it would not be attached to the boom. You tie the mainsheet around the boom, take it down to the block attached to the bridel, then to the boom block, and back to the mainsheet block

very similar to this
 
#72
I've though of doing a center traveler, it can be done.

It would be nice to have a track traveler like the Europe or Finn, - -

And I do beleive it would work, the mast and boom should be strong enough
Ross - assuming you want to maintain the same Leech tension upwind in 20+ Kts try and imagine the kicker (sorry vang) tension you would require to get the outhaul end of the boom the same height off the rear deck as you do when you are block to blocking. If you think that will work - try it on your boat between races next time out and when you have got it as close as you can - look at the resulting sail shape - be quick now because I reckon you're wrong about the boom strength and you may not have long to admire the 'new' sail shape!
 
#73
yes, across the front of the cockpit, so it would be just infront of the boom block, so you would never strangle yourself, and it would not be attached to the boom. You tie the mainsheet around the boom, take it down to the block attached to the bridel, then to the boom block, and back to the mainsheet block
So, the load on the mainsheet would be higher because the sheet is now attached to the middle rather than the end of the boom. The boom would bend in the middle causing all kinds of leech problems, and the boom would be pulled to the centerline of the boat by the length of the bridle, causing sheeting angle problems.
Why is this a good idea?
 
#75
this is not at all a professional opinion--
During the pacific coast champs, a carbon composite topsection was available for testing by tracy usher and the like, i believe he said that he wasn't wild about it. I really don't think that it would be worth it with the increase in cost.

as for aluminum topsections, ive heard that the australian ones are the best right now. true?
 
#76
I have no personal experience but the 'For Sale' ads in the UK often claim that an Australian top section is stiffer therefore best for heavier sailors.
 
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Ross B

Guest
#77
When I move out of the house and my parents don't care what I do to my laser, I'll try it on my old boat. I won't do it now because I don't want to drill holes in it and deal with the "Wrath of Dad!!!!:O"

And when I was in the junior program, we used to dick around, and would often sail around with the mainsheet dead ended at the first boom block. And the boat was sail able. In order to get the right leech tension, the height of the bridle simply has to be adjusted. Being that I have never tried it, I don't know how high.

But I'm not an engineering student, nor have I ever claimed to be, and I have not played one on TV, and I did not stay in a motel six last night. So don't take my word for it. I just had a really good idea. (At least I think so, if you don't like, move on!)
 
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