Drysuit vs Zhik Superwarm Suit??

jeffers

Active Member
#21
1- to say you are not going in the drink or capsizing makes me laugh.

2- drysuit drysuit drysuit. I hate getting wet and sometimes do flip or fall out of the boat. Plus I hate getting wet.

With the drysuit I can go straight to the bar in the same clothes I just sailed
in.
1) This is just my opinion and my experience

2) If I sail a different class of boat (I often crew in a Fireball) then it is drysuit all the way unless the weather is particularly warm and the drysuit would make me too warm.

3) The lake I sail on is inland and relatively sheltered. There is always a safety boat at hand should anything happen. I know my abilities and limitations.

I do agree that a capsize or a swim can happen at any time due to something unforseen (such as equipment failure). However I still maintain that once you are cempetent you can minimise the risk of capsizing and tailor your clothing suitably.

As I said above I am still warm enough even after a short swim due to the work rate in the boat. If I go in too much or get too cold I go ashore, simple as.

If I sailed on more open water or on the sea then I am sure my approach to clothing would be different. Perhaps I should have qualified my statement.
 
#22
FWIW I wear:

Rooster Pro hikers + Lycra shorts over
Cotton t-shirt
Sweatshirt (if it is really chilly)
Rooster Aquafleece (tucked into the Lycra shorts to prevent the spray going up the back)
Fleece or thinsulate hat
Wetboots
Thick woolly socks
Get rid of the cotton! No matter what the temps.
Wool or polypro.
 
#23
After years spent not frostbiting it's time!! Trying to decide between going with the old standard drysuit or skipping the "420/FJ" wear and trying the just as expensive Zhik Superwarm combo of skiffsuit and top. Anybody have direct experiences or for that matter, alternatives?

FWIW, sailing out of southeastern Virginia, so water only really cold starting in January...
I am 200lbs, 5'10" with afro. that makes me stout. I also get hot easier and sweat above average. i have big meaty thighs and a large shoulder and chest measurement, i am a 35 waist. i am not fat, but i am not a pinner either. I lift and ride a bike 3x a week.

This year i bit the bullet and decided i would not be constantly concerned with clothing and wearing crappy stuff

45 degrees plus air temp in warm water, in this case the air is cold , water somewhat warm...
i bought XL zhik 3/4 hikers (APS) with power pads. so far these things have been really really awesome, thin, warm and flexible. i wear a poly pro top or my new metalite sea australia top, regular gloves. my calfs dont even notice anything from being exposed....

below 45 degrees somewhat cold water
Shin Tech Rooster suit (intensity). Man do i love this thing, it has fleece like lining and a super flexible neoprene, fits me great XL. Add Superwarm (aps) from zhik L. Great setup, i wore this in 38 degrees and 45 degree water, have not gone in the water yet. if the water is warm regular gloves.

Below 35 degrees, similar water
This is unchartered right now, i am tempted to keep wearing the shin tech as long as possible for mobility. even falling in, i would be okay in the shin tech probably until about 40 degrees?

or

I also pisked up a Gil breathable dryuit with the neoprene neck and cuffs on the sale rack..(APS). My wife, who is a little concerned with my cowboyness (i have sailed in shorts all the way down to 45 degrees before) insisted on it for her piece of mind
I will probably go to this quicker cause i know it is breathable..

Extremities
Gill 3mm boots (APS) and winter gloves (APS), Patagonia Beanie, and a baclava(EMS) when its really really cold...
 
Thread starter #24
Hey Everybody,

Great discussion!! Thanks for all your inputs, hopefully everyone who read the thread took some value away, I sure did!

First "frostbite" last weekend (not exactly Newport or LI Sound cold) was mid-40's airtemp and mid-50's water temp. Most wore wetsuits with a couple of drysuits. The few who swam in wetsuits (all ramp launched) were fine until we were finished and then got chilly while hanging out after sailing. A full wetsuit or skiff suit like the Zhik or Rooster would have been good to go, just would have wanted to change out asap after sailing if it was wet...

Happy holidays all!!

ALJM
 
#25
Hey Everybody,

Great discussion!! Thanks for all your inputs, hopefully everyone who read the thread took some value away, I sure did!

First "frostbite" last weekend (not exactly Newport or LI Sound cold) was mid-40's airtemp and mid-50's water temp. Most wore wetsuits with a couple of drysuits. The few who swam in wetsuits (all ramp launched) were fine until we were finished and then got chilly while hanging out after sailing. A full wetsuit or skiff suit like the Zhik or Rooster would have been good to go, just would have wanted to change out asap after sailing if it was wet...

Happy holidays all!!

ALJM
Its amazing how quickly u get cold in a wetsuit when you stop moving, have to change before derigging sometimes...

cheers...
 
#26
Its amazing how quickly u get cold in a wetsuit when you stop moving, have to change before derigging sometimes...

cheers...
I agree (though cannot compare wet to dry suites in this regard). It is whilst sailing around between races that I start to shiver; during the race I seem better (though I do sometimes wonder if this is related to concentrating on other things during the race).

Ian
 

Eric_R

D10 Secretary
#27
I agree (though cannot compare wet to dry suites in this regard). It is whilst sailing around between races that I start to shiver; during the race I seem better (though I do sometimes wonder if this is related to concentrating on other things during the race).

Ian
adrenalin. Once the racing starts that'll kick in and plus you are moving more.

If you get cold between races get in a few roll tacks to warm up.
 
#29
adrenalin. Once the racing starts that'll kick in and plus you are moving more.

If you get cold between races get in a few roll tacks to warm up.
Until ~10 minutes pass and you suffer from the eventual and inevitable adrenalin dump, which would make you feel worse than in the first place.

Running off adrenalin is usually never beneficial.

Agreed on the moving more part. Hiking usually doesn't provide much warmth, though.

or man up and go out win just your swim shorts? x
You first, hero.
 
#30
Sailed in sub zero on Sunday, the sun made it bareable. 3mm wetsuit/ wooly bear/ drysuit/ neoprene balaclava/ woolly hat. First time I have tried all that, did not feel restricted in the f3.
 

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#31
I always used to be cold in drysuits when I wore them in my youth.

Nowdays my kitbag is as follows:
Rooster pro hikers
Poly Pro top
Rooster Hot top
Gill Breathable + fleecy lined dinghy top
Hat
Wet socks
neoprene gloves

I sail with this down to about 4-5 degrees air temp. I don't mind wiping out in this gear, I stay just as warm even when I've had a few dunkings.

When it's closer to freezing and below I've got a 3mm long wetsuit I can add underneath everything, which I have done a couple of times when it's been below freezing and I've always been BOILING!

On the south coast of the UK, the water never really gets that cold. 5-6 degrees is about as bad as it gets, maybe I'd be more pro-drysuit if it was nearer to 1-0.

Anyway, for us in the UK Zhik stuff is amazingly expensive. The hikers cost twice as much as the rooster pro. Are they 100% more effective? No. You'd be better off putting that £100 into your "new sail" fund or spending it on some sessions with a coach.
 
#32
...

Agreed on the moving more part. Hiking usually doesn't provide much warmth, though.
...
I disagree - when I'm hiking hard my heart rate is between 140-160bpm, same as when I'm going for a brisk cycle or a run, and it keeps me just as warm as doing those two activities.

(I have to cycle in shorts unless it's below freezing or I get too hot).
 
#34
I sailed at the Grafham Grand Prix yesterday (for the non UK members its a mixed fleet handicap event on a lake). Lots of people dropped out due to the cold conditions (the car said 4degrees when we arrived but lots of ice everywhere and getting to the waters edge was interesting due to slipping all over the place whilst trying to pull my boat). My husband capsized in the first race and informs me that there were bits of ice floating in the lake. I raced in the kit below

Polypro legs and top
SEA winter hot top
Musto top
Rooster pro hikers
Aquafleece
Rooster semi dry
Wetsocks
Hat and neck gaiter

With this lot I was still warm at the end of the second race and was the only laser to complete both races. Even the dry suit wearers were giving up due to the cold. The reaches were fairly evil as it was good and windy so fast and fun, but the spray on the reach was like having ice shards thrown in your face!

Tried to sail at Haversham SC today but the lake was iced over again (couldn't sail on boxing day either) so hopefully it will warm up a bit soon.
 
#35
I disagree - when I'm hiking hard my heart rate is between 140-160bpm, same as when I'm going for a brisk cycle or a run, and it keeps me just as warm as doing those two activities.

(I have to cycle in shorts unless it's below freezing or I get too hot).
Definitely agree hiking keeps you warm. Once I'm racing I get very warm but need the layers to keep warm inbetween races when sitting around doing not a lot.
 
#37
I disagree - when I'm hiking hard my heart rate is between 140-160bpm, same as when I'm going for a brisk cycle or a run, and it keeps me just as warm as doing those two activities.

(I have to cycle in shorts unless it's below freezing or I get too hot).
So you keep your HR at 140-160 BPM for 15+ minutes?

I can't say I share your experience.

(I wear shorts year round, well below freezing. Just because I want to.)

Also, your period should have gone inside your parentheses.
 
#38
So you keep your HR at 140-160 BPM for 15+ minutes?

I can't say I share your experience.

(I wear shorts year round, well below freezing. Just because I want to.)

Also, your period should have gone inside your parentheses.

Yup, I've raced with a HR monitor a few times to see what kind of effort it takes. Going downwind it drops a little, but a lot less than you'd think if working the boat hard.

Obviously I'm talking about "max power" conditions here...

I don't have to be running at 140+, can quite happily perch over the rail and just tick over, but believe me you go much faster when working hard.
 
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