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Drain water from 1972 Sunfish hull

robbud

New Member
Hello. I have water in the hull of a 1972 sunfish that I want to get rid off. Was thinking of drilling a small hole 1/2 inch in diameter just below the rudder attachment so I can then lift up the bow to drain the water. Bad idea? Any other suggestions?
 

JohnCT

Active Member
Sometimes the water doesn't all want to come out.
A piece of tubing that fits through the hole and a shop vac will clean out the rest.
 

Webfoot1

Active Member
I've got one where someone drilled holes in the transom. It's not uncommon to see
someone mount a drain plug fitting there. I think this is done so you can pull the boat
up on the beach and drain the water without having to tilt the boat on it's side. You
can just pull the plug and walk away. As long as the beach slopes downward the water
will drain to the rear. The deck drain never did work well and I never understood how
it was expected to work with the foam block in the way. Most of the water stays trapped
in the expanding foam anyway. Install ports, be happy!
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
The drain hole in the deck sometimes is clogged with loose bits of yellow- or white- plastic (foam) material.

The transom is very thin, and a smooth hole is difficult to drill. Be prepared to install a brass bushing, and seal it well.
 

water rat

Member
The drain hole in the deck sometimes is clogged with loose bits of yellow- or white- plastic (foam) material.

The transom is very thin, and a smooth hole is difficult to drill. Be prepared to install a brass bushing, and seal it well.
When drilling into fiberglass you risk having the stuff shatter. To overcome this use a Hole Saw with very slight pressure. You can get a Hole Saw kit at Harbor freight for less than nine bucks if you have a 20%off coupon. If you do not live near a HF then scond choice would be a diamond tip drill point. Third choice is to cover the drill area with tape and use a sharp drill pont. This is the method of last resort especialy if the point is not super sharp. In all cases let the drill point do the work...only apply enough pressure to keep the drill upright. I offer this as a former employee of a kayak shop and former co-owner of a kayak touring company where fiberglass repairs were part of the job.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Not a fan of adding holes close to or below the waterline. My choice would be an inspection port on the deck.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
Not a fan of adding holes close to or below the waterline. My choice would be an inspection port on the deck.
Works well with this $8 battery-powered bailer:


($16 at Amazon).

:confused:

The transom is almost always out of the water, even when moored.

A brass fitting, as I suggested :oops: isn't the best answer—this one's better:


Common on catamarans, and seals very well.

Remember to put the plug back in before sailing. :eek:
 

JohnCT

Active Member
That is what I used to replace the frozen brass deck drain.
An inspection port and grout sponge seem to work well for me.
 

water rat

Member
Hello. I have water in the hull of a 1972 sunfish that I want to get rid off. Was thinking of drilling a small hole 1/2 inch in diameter just below the rudder attachment so I can then lift up the bow to drain the water. Bad idea? Any other suggestions?
Thats where the drain plug for mine is. Like to add to the fiberglass advice:. Look for a diamond hole cutter the size of your drain pl.ug. I use one made by Lenox Lowes should have them but expect to pay upwards of the low 20's for one. Make a template out of a piece of wood with a wood drill point. Tape it to where you want to drill. Have a friend stand by with a bottle of water. Now start drilling as he pours..keep drilling and pouring. Stop after a minute or so and remove the template. You should be able to fit the drill point into what you drilled. Continue drilling... and poring and within ten seconds or so you should have a perfect hole. Templates keep the gel coat from shattering.
 
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Zork

New Member
I found another way to drain the water. Unscrew the bow handle and tilt the boat forward. Water came out so fast out the screw holes it arc'd about an inch in the air! :p
 

Sailflow

Active Member
Zork. How old is your boat? Older boats have wood block backers the sometimes fall off if all the screws are removed.
 

Zork

New Member
77. Just take off one screw on each end. You can also install threaded inserts with silicone sealant.
 
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