Dolly/steep shore issue

Thread starter #1
I'm looking for advice on securing my Sunfish to my Seitech dolly. I now use a strap from a Yakima rack system to hold the boat in place, but it's awkward, grabbing the strap from one side, walking around to the other side, threading the strap through the loop and tightening it, often with the waves bouncing the boat around. There has to be a simpler way. Ideas?
 
Thread starter #3
Why don't you pull it out of the water first, and then if you need to strap it down for some reason, do it onshore? I have never seen anyone strap it down in the water, ever.
A steep shoreline and frequently rough water - nothing to hold the boat onto the dolly. I'd be pulling up an empty dolly as the boat slipped into the water.
 
Thread starter #6
Lash a temporary rope thru the bow handle and the handle of the dolly...to prevent it sliding backwards?
I think that's the way to go. Of course, I don't have a bow handle, so I need to figure out if I still have a backing block to attach a handle to, or affix some other hardware to the bow that can be used to anchor a strap linking bow to dolly. Thank you.
 
#7
I think that's the way to go. Of course, I don't have a bow handle, so I need to figure out if I still have a backing block to attach a handle to, or affix some other hardware to the bow that can be used to anchor a strap linking bow to dolly. Thank you.
Leave the mast in the mast tube and then tie your line around the mast and secure the line to the front of the dolly. That will keep the boat from sliding down and off the strap.

- Andy
 
Thread starter #8
Leave the mast in the mast tube and then tie your line around the mast and secure the line to the front of the dolly. That will keep the boat from sliding down and off the strap.

- Andy
Excellent idea, thanks Andy. I won't get into the low hanging tree branches near shore that require me to step the mast as I'm pulling the boat out. A saw for tree trimming, a shovel for digging out dolly wheels buried in rocks that waves wash ashore, a corkscrew for removing the drain hole cork plug - all the elements of a classic sailing experience!
 
#9
sounds like the "solution" is actually a new launch site ;-D. A proper sized piece of PVC pipe that only sticks up a foot or so, inserted in the mast hole, might be an answer if you have to lower the mast prior to hauling. Other than that, I'm thinking grappling hook or ice climbing picks. I mean.....what else is there? ;-)
 
Thread starter #10
sounds like the "solution" is actually a new launch site ;-D. A proper sized piece of PVC pipe that only sticks up a foot or so, inserted in the mast hole, might be an answer if you have to lower the mast prior to hauling. Other than that, I'm thinking grappling hook or ice climbing picks. I mean.....what else is there? ;-)
I'm using a winch, attached to a tree, to crank the dolly out of the water, so changing launch site not an option. But the PVC suggestion is a good one. Thanks all.
 
#11
I have a launch site where the gravel shore is too loose and deep for my tow vehicle and too steep to pull up the boat on its' trailer by hand, when returning. I therefore bought a heavy duty, tongue jack, with a decent sized wheel... (one of those 1000lb capacity tongue jacks for larger powerboat trailers). It's simple to unhook from my van and using gravity, roll the affair down to the water. The loose gravel keeps things from a "run away". Also, unless launch areas are really steep, I can still control it rolling down to the water. Then pulling out, I attach a strong line...about 40-50ft is what I need to keep my car back wheels still out of the gravel, and hook that to my trailer (now sitting in the water, with the boat loaded). It's a straight pull...so I can just yank the whole affair up and out. The front tongue jack keeps the trailer coupler from burying itself in the ground and helps to "roll" things along. This way I don't have to get much closer than 50ft to the water's edge with my van and as long as it is a straight "run" a fairly easy affair to pull out. I have several launch sites where this method is good to be able to do....grassy shore lines or places that have access, but really no ramps built.
All that said, it is kinda a hassle and I just like backing the trailer down into the water, but sometimes you go the extra mile. ;-)
 
#12
A proper sized piece of PVC pipe that only sticks up a foot or so, inserted in the mast hole, might be an answer if you have to lower the mast prior to hauling.
Exactly. Here's a picture of PVC pipe I use to simulate my mast when I'm tinkering on Sunfish gear projects. Also handy for demonstrating how I hold my paddle to the deck during a recent forum post.

I will tell you, that PVC in that diameter and wall thickness is plenty stout enough to use to hold the boat on a dolly while cranking a boat up a steep shoreline. By the way, my PVC mast is labeled as, "2 Inch Schedule 40". With the 2 inches being the inside diameter. The outside diameter is 2 and 3/8ths inches.

- Andy

Blade.jpg
 
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#13
I will tell you, that PVC in that diameter and wall thickness is plenty stout enough to use to hold the boat on a dolly while cranking a boat up a steep shoreline. …..snip
You know this post is now going to get people asking about using it as mast replacement sections in lighter air now, don't cha think?? ;-D ….or take PVC and glass a sleeve around it to make a fiberglass mast... who knows.. ??? ;-)
 
#14
btw….like the paddle idea of wedging it against the splash guard...I'm guessing against the bow handle too. That way a longer paddle can be used. I have a dinky kayak half that I bungee to the front of the upper spar.
 
Thread starter #16
Exactly. Here's a picture of PVC pipe I use to simulate my mast when I'm tinkering on Sunfish gear projects. Also handy for demonstrating how I hold my paddle to the deck during a recent forum post.

I will tell you, that PVC in that diameter and wall thickness is plenty stout enough to use to hold the boat on a dolly while cranking a boat up a steep shoreline. By the way, my PVC mast is labeled as, "2 Inch Schedule 40". With the 2 inches being the inside diameter. The outside diameter is 2 and 3/8ths inches.

- Andy

View attachment 33832
Thanks Andy and mixmkr. Off to the store for a piece of PVC. Now if I hadn't just thrown away that length of pipe that washed up on my beach...
 
#19
2" schedule 40 PVC is still probably an upgrade over the 1/2" or 3/4" they used on Snark sailboats. They reminded me of the aluminum(?) poles my mom used to prop up our clothesline when it was loaded up with wet clothes.
 
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