Does this part of the gudgeon do anything?

Thread starter #21
Ok, I got the tube added and while I was pulling on stuff, the two screws holding the wingnut plate down came out. Probably would have come out while sailing if I hadn't done it. Can I add an inspection plate here so I can add a backing plate under it? Don't know if there's foam in the way. And is there already something under the bar that I will have to remove, like an old backing plate? 20180225_193502.jpg
 

Webfoot1

Active Member
#22
You have it correct, you'd just have to dig out some foam. Before doing anything I'd
do a little research and see if it's worth it for you to install the updated rudder system. If
so the inspection hole would be moved rearward over the screw holes securing the
gudgeon plate. If you could get someone to sell you the rudder cheeks for about
$45 I'd say update it. The rest of that parts are not that expensive if you don't mind
making a few wood shavings.
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
#23
"Can I add an inspection plate here so I can add a backing plate under it?" Yes
"Don't know if there's foam in the way." There is, just cut through it. You will probably cut through a piece of wood that is part of the backer plate as well.
"And is there already something under the bar that I will have to remove, like an old backing plate?" Yes, probably a rotted piece of wood held in by a strip of fiberglass.

deck plate backer.JPG

Here's a link to our blog on rudder conversions, some of the same steps you'll take to access the backer block. Small Boat Restoration: Search results for conversion
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#24
More things to consider:

1) A member here suggests cutting access holes in the bottom of the hull. The repair is more "involved", but basically invisible.
2) The later style of rudder can be purchased with plastic "cheeks"—rather than the more-preferable older aluminum.
3) Items listed at eBay can be bought for a bid—rather than the higher "list" (Buy-It-Now") prices.
4) Your old rudder parts have value at eBay, but understand how the bid process works. Don't "lose" your rudder for a 99¢ bid!
5) A new stainless steel gudgeon plate should cost less than $15.
6) With a new inspection port, replace screws with (the more secure) stainless steel bolts.
7) Replacement backing plates can be made of different species of hardwoods—or use aluminum or stainless steel scraps. Below is a grille for cooking BBQ shrimp. Suitable in size for several permanent stainless steel backing plates, it was purchased at a yard sale for $1.

P5220032-002.JPG
 
Thread starter #25
At this point, I'm not really interested in changing rudders, I just want a small boat I can get on the water with. This would be a lot of expense for a boat I haven't even sailed yet.
Why do you have pictures of a yellow boat with the hole near the transom, and a blue boat with the hole where I was going to put it, and a white boat as well?
It seems like I can't fix mine with the thought of redoing it later, because the hole needs to be near the transom. Or have an extra hole in the deck...
Can you reuse the original rudder, or do you need to replace that too?
 
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beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#27
As I recall you can get the new rudder plate in in the future even if the hole is a little ways away. It has to be within arms length. It’s trickier but doable

You will very likely hit foam regardless of where the Bible says there is foam. They liberally used yellow spray in foam and I think the white blocks gets a bit closer to the stern than shown.
 
Thread starter #28
Well, since I'm cutting the hole anyway, I would prefer using the new hardware if I didn't have to buy a new rudder, but I can't tell if he used his old one.
 
Thread starter #30
Oh, if it can be done with a little chiseling, that would be much easier than building a whole new one. Stick some cardboard in the cheek, trace around it, transfer that and the rotation curve to the rudder and shave off the difference...
 

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#36
You’ll need the new straps. I have seen the straps bent in order to fit the old tiller, but that’s not a common modification. You could buy the new straps and use an old hockey stick for the tiller.
 

Webfoot1

Active Member
#37
You can cut the tiller to fit but the straps are different. There is a rudder head on Ebay for
$75. If you are willing to make your own rudder and buy the rest of the parts you'll have
about $150 into it, a little bit less than the boats value. Buying a new rudder, rudder head
and parts will put you above the boats value, probably not such a good deal.
 
Thread starter #38
You’ll need the new straps. I have seen the straps bent in order to fit the old tiller, but that’s not a common modification. You could buy the new straps and use an old hockey stick for the tiller.
If the old straps need to be bent to fit the new rudder, how come the new straps don't need to be bent to fit the old tiller? Or will the tiller need to be cut down to fit the new straps?
EDIT: Oh, you said an old hockey stick, I thought you were calling the old tiller a hockey stick...
 
Thread starter #39
You can cut the tiller to fit but the straps are different. There is a rudder head on Ebay for
$75. If you are willing to make your own rudder and buy the rest of the parts you'll have
about $150 into it, a little bit less than the boats value. Buying a new rudder, rudder head
and parts will put you above the boats value, probably not such a good deal.
I paid too much for the boat, so I'm not concerned with it's value, but I would like to sail it soon. I've built a rudder and tiller before and I'm not interested in doing that again. At this point I just want to throw some money at it and be done, but I need to know what fits what. So if I can get the rudder and cheek assembly and maybe new straps and cut the tiller to fit, I'd be happy.
EDIT: Yikes, I didn't see how much two straps cost before...$66 at Sunfish, $11 at Intensity.
 

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#40
To get sailing and to save some complexities, you could cut a smaller (4" or 5") inspection port as indicated below. For convenience, position the new port so the distance from inspection port to ["pulled"] screw is the same as from your elbow to your thumb.

The existing upper backing plate may be sufficiently solid to support bolts and "Nylock" [self-securing] nuts. Of course, the old wood backing plate can also be removed. The existing lower backing plate screw may need attention, too. A new bolt there would be a good idea.

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