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Deck attachments

doorman

New Member
I stored my boat on a trailer in a marina .. and somebody stole the bowhandle and screws off my boat.

I've since purchased the handle but none of the appropriate hardware to attach the handle to the deck came with it.

Can anybody help me with what kind of screws I need and how it is secured in a stable fashion to the dick?
 

Fred P

Member
You may have to put in an access port. The handle is backed by a wooden block in the hull. If the removal of the screws caused the block to drop into the hull you won't have any way to get backing for the handle except to get into the hull. If the wood block is still behind the deck you can get new stainless screws for the new handle. I don't know the screw size.
I'm sure others in this forum will have some answers for you.

Fred
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
Ooooooooh , don't do it !
I'm confused :confused:, why not re-attach a bow handle?


If the removal of the screws caused the block to drop into the hull you won't have any way to get backing for the handle except to get into the hull. If the wood block is still behind the deck you can get new stainless screws for the new handle. I don't know the screw size.
My preference is a stainless steel, straight shank, oval head screw. This style is called a sheet metal screw.



I begin by cleaning the screw holes with something such as a pipe cleaner. I peer into the hole using a light and even probe with a wire to see if the backing block is still firmly attached and not rotting.

If the block is there and in good shape, I fill the holes with epoxy, churning it with a bit of wire or a toothpick while I drizzle it in to be sure it flows to the bottom of the hole and there's no trapped air.

Once the epoxy has set I re-drill the holes to the proper drill size to match the screws I chose. Take the handle with you when you shop screws to match the screw head to the handle's counter-sunk holes..., that will likely get you a shank that's reasonable for the job.

The backing block is around 3/4" thick so 1-1/4 shank length would be about max you need. [ Handle + Deck + Block ]

If you discover the backing block has fallen or rotted away, post a new question for hints on dealing with that scenario.
 

Attachments

doorman

New Member
Thank you for this very valuable information. I will let you know how it worked out.



I'm confused :confused:, why not re-attach a bow handle?



My preference is a stainless steel, straight shank, oval head screw. This style is called a sheet metal screw.



I begin by cleaning the screw holes with something such as a pipe cleaner. I peer into the hole using a light and even probe with a wire to see if the backing block is still firmly attached and not rotting.

If the block is there and in good shape, I fill the holes with epoxy, churning it with a bit of wire or a toothpick while I drizzle it in to be sure it flows to the bottom of the hole and there's no trapped air.

Once the epoxy has set I re-drill the holes to the proper drill size to match the screws I chose. Take the handle with you when you shop screws to match the screw head to the handle's counter-sunk holes..., that will likely get you a shank that's reasonable for the job.

The backing block is around 3/4" thick so 1-1/4 shank length would be about max you need. [ Handle + Deck + Block ]

If you discover the backing block has fallen or rotted away, post a new question for hints on dealing with that scenario.
 

Webfoot

New Member
Before you screw the handle back down, apply:
3M 5200 Marine Adhesive Sealant

to the base of the handle, it will glue the handle to the deck.
 

Alcort59224

Member
I strongly recommend that you do not use 3m 5200. 5200 is such a strong adhesive you will never be able to get the handle off in the future if you need to (if it breaks ect...), If you try to remove it when its held on by 5200 you will do damage to the deck, The screws should be what holds on the handle not the caulk.
-Eric
 

Wayne

Member Emeritus
I strongly recommend that you do not use 3m 5200. 5200 is such a strong adhesive you will never be able to get the handle off in the future if you need to
I'll second that and just add, a thin film of marine silicone caulk or equivalent doesn't hurt to keep water from seeping in and promoting backing block rot. However, if you epoxy and re-drill the holes the backing blocks should already be sealed. If you want to glue down the handle permanently why not just epoxy it to the deck (not recommended)
 

Hotfish

New Member
The proper screws would be a 8 -32 stainless steel screw oval head. This can be found at Lowes in the stainless steel screw section. As fo 3m 5200 that is the best bet, 5200 can be remove by appling acetone to loosen or clean up excess around handle. If the screw hole is still to large try a 10-20 size. Hope this helps.
Kevin
 

ivy

New Member
I'll second that and just add, a thin film of marine silicone caulk or equivalent doesn't hurt to keep water from seeping in and promoting backing block rot. However, if you epoxy and re-drill the holes the backing blocks should already be sealed. If you want to glue down the handle permanently why not just epoxy it to the deck (not recommended)
Even better than silicone is polysulfide caulks. Definitely do not use 5200. The bond is stronger than fiberglass.

Here's an article that might help:

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance-articles/19922-mounting-deck-hardware.html
 

Zeppo

Member
I agree "Ivy" products like "BoatLife" caulk are polysulphide, they bond well, remain flexible and seal very well. I have found that silicone doesn't remain sealed as well, it tends to lift.
 
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