cheap rudder/daggerboard paint solution?

OK, I know that cheap isn't always wise, but I'm wondering if anyone has had good results from some non-marine paint on a wood rudder & daggerboard. I'm restoring an older Sunfish and the original rudder is very stained from sitting partially in the water (w/ a green beard!), so it'll never look good varnished. (I do have it sanded down at the moment.) I'm also building a new daggerboard out of African tapele wood (similar to mahogany) and was thinking I'd just paint it to match the rudder, although I might varnish it instead if it looks really cool when finished. Anyway, as to my question: Anyone have a good cheap paint suggestion? I do have some Pettit topside paint, but they recommend their own marine sealer and marine primer ($$$) first. Anyone happy w/ more common Home Depot kind of paints? Looking for success stories from those who have been happy w/ results of what they've tried...

THanks!
Kevin
 

dinghyone

Curmudgeon
We use Krylon Appliance epoxy in a spray can. About $4 a can. Works fantastically if you follow the application instructions and give it a week to completely dry.

Good Luck,
cpb
 

Porpoise2

New Member
I do have some Pettit topside paint, but they recommend their own marine sealer and marine primer ($$$) first.
That's exactly the paint I referred to this past summer on this forum that "should not be immersed for more than three hours". (According to the instructions).

I didn't use the primer or sealer, but painted over a sanded Awl Grip finish. (A very good paint). The Pettit topcoat paint finish blistered above the Awl Grip in short order. This week, I just discovered the second, unused, quart of "Pettit Topside" recently which I'd bought over ten years ago, marked-down from $39 to 18.99! (But saved a 30-mile roundtrip in my "buying locally"). :rolleyes:

"...I'm also building a new daggerboard out of African tapele wood (similar to mahogany) and was thinking I'd just paint it to match the rudder, although I might varnish it instead if it looks really cool when finished..."
There's nothing like freshly-varnished wood: You could always paint it to match at a later time.

Since sanding is the only impediment to determining the wood's condition underneath the green algae, why not determine that the rudder is beyond salvaging its finish with a serious sanding-job and thorough drying-out? Both would look great varnished. Then you would have matching varnished rudder and daggerboard. :)
 
Since sanding is the only impediment to determining the wood's condition underneath the green algae, why not determine that the rudder is beyond salvaging its finish with a serious sanding-job and thorough drying-out? Both would look great varnished. Then you would have matching varnished rudder and daggerboard. :)

Already done this before making my original post. The staining runs very, very deep and looks quite horrid. From woodwork I've done in the past, I know that varnishing horribly stained wood doesn't do anything to help its looks.

BTW, I spoke with a local boat builder who said that Pettit will work great if applied directly onto bare wood, with the first coat thinned down by mineral spirits 50%. He said it thus permeates the wood and provides the best grip for further coats. He was very leary of using it over primers or other paints, by the way. Hmm, decisions, decisions!
 

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