Changing Rudder Pivot Point

beldar boathead

Well-Known Member
#21
You won’t be able to keep up with a Laser until it’s blowing 20 or so. At that point if you can hike hard you will go the same speed upwind but he’ll go faster offwind.

The Cunningham is useful for de powering when it gets windy. Otherwise you won’t need to use it. It’ll help you depower when it hits perhaps 12-14 knots and more.
 
#22
It's possible to notch the bottom leading edge of the rudder (in the cassette) to change the angle 10 degrees or so. You do have to plug and re-drill the hole for the tiller strap to get the angle back to normal. Drilling the hole isn't hard all you need to do is tighten the 2 rudder strap bolts enough to keep the holes parallel. drill half way from the right and half way from the left. Drilling only 3/8 deep from each side will not show a 3 degree error where they intersect because it's too short of a distance, I.E. self correcting.
It is worth the effort for a 10~15 degree reduction. it won't make you miraculously fast, but it takes some side load off the tiller. That reduced side force and good body positioning will get you to a point with almost no side load on the tiller while sailing. I've been sailing with roughly 108 degrees for about a year. Don't tell World Sailing, as I know they live in fear of an old 200 lb. sailor in a 1973 Sunfish winning the worlds. ;)
 
Thread starter #23
It's possible to notch the bottom leading edge of the rudder (in the cassette) to change the angle 10 degrees or so. You do have to plug and re-drill the hole for the tiller strap to get the angle back to normal. Drilling the hole isn't hard all you need to do is tighten the 2 rudder strap bolts enough to keep the holes parallel. drill half way from the right and half way from the left. Drilling only 3/8 deep from each side will not show a 3 degree error where they intersect because it's too short of a distance, I.E. self correcting.
It is worth the effort for a 10~15 degree reduction. it won't make you miraculously fast, but it takes some side load off the tiller. That reduced side force and good body positioning will get you to a point with almost no side load on the tiller while sailing. I've been sailing with roughly 108 degrees for about a year. Don't tell World Sailing, as I know they live in fear of an old 200 lb. sailor in a 1973 Sunfish winning the worlds. ;)
Eddie, thanks for the reply. Any chance that you have photos???
 
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