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carbon tiller retaining pin... yes or no?

Should I drill a hole in my carbon tiller for the retaining pin?


  • Total voters
    25

JohnK

Member
I just got my Black Diamond carbon tiller and look forward to trying it out. However, I was curious to learn if others have drilled a small hole into the tiller to accept the retaining pin. It seems like it would be a good idea to use the retaining pin, but I am not sure if the hole weakens the carbon in any way or has other ill effects.

So, should I drill a hole in the new tiller for the retaining pin or not?
 

49208

Tentmaker
The fit in the rudder head is nice and snug, and with the downhaul on, it serves to keep the tiller locked firmly in the rudder head, so the pin is not needed. I've been sailing w/o one in mine for a couple of years.
 

Murphs

New Member
If im not mistaken, the pin is necessary in regattas?

I drilled mine just for that reason, but i often dont worry about actually putting it in.
 

49208

Tentmaker
Not needed under class rules:
16c says
[font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][size=-1](c)[/size][/font][font=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][size=-1]The use of a tiller retaining pin is optional.[/size][/font]

It's just one more thing for the mainsheet to catch on during a gybe too
 

peterbye

New Member
49208 said:
It's just one more thing for the mainsheet to catch on during a gybe too
That's why I stopped using the pin, however I have a rule that the pin goes in before I release the downhaul, which I sometimes remember .
 

49208

Tentmaker
peterbye said:
That's why I stopped using the pin, however I have a rule that the pin goes in before I release the downhaul, which I sometimes remember .
I only have used the ACME BD tiller, even w/o the downhaul on, it's still pretty hard to have it fall out of the rudder head, due to the snug fit and the distance between the trav. and the downhaul cleat. If your trav is on tight, the tiller won't come all the way out of the rudder head as the cleat hits the trav....
 
I've had trouble keeping my carbon tiller in the rudder head. The rudder downhaul would not keep it in, it would slide out an inch or two. My carbon tiller has a hole that runs parallel to the rudder head so that I can insert a line through it and tie it to the rudder head. This keeps the tiller in the rudder head for me.

I've also seen people put a loop in their rudder downhaul, between their cleat and the rudder head. After the loop is tied the line goes through the end of their cleat, then through the loop, then back through their cleat. I haven't tried this, you might look around at other people's boats at regattas.
 

Rob B

Well-Known Member
Cindy Taylor said:
I've had trouble keeping my carbon tiller in the rudder head. The rudder downhaul would not keep it in, it would slide out an inch or two. My carbon tiller has a hole that runs parallel to the rudder head so that I can insert a line through it and tie it to the rudder head. This keeps the tiller in the rudder head for me.

I've also seen people put a loop in their rudder downhaul, between their cleat and the rudder head. After the loop is tied the line goes through the end of their cleat, then through the loop, then back through their cleat. I haven't tried this, you might look around at other people's boats at regattas.
If your tiller has ANY play in it with the downhaul on then you don't have the downhaul on. It is critical when sailing that the rudder remains straight down. The loop in the downhaul line you describe is what I use. I replaced the stock rudder downhaul line with a line that is much thinner, put the loop in for the extra purchase and crank it on. I have never used the tiller pin.
 

vtgent49

Member
Hi,

I use an ACME BD, no pin and a 3:1 line. I tie a loop about 2 " from the stopper knot hole as I can, usiing a bowline, then pass the line around the front of the SS bars that hold the rudder head, over the top bar and back to the loop. Thru the loop, over the top bar again then out to the cleat. This way the highly loaded part of the line is very short, and there is no fussing each time you rig. I do "tap" the tiller in, then cleat it hard, then tie it off with a clove hitch.

This holds the tiller well, and the blade. If you pull up on a 1:1 rigged blade, you'll feel some movement, compared to very little with this set up.

I'm also sure that drilling a pin hole will not matter at all, as this is an unloaded part of the tiller, should that be your preference. I can see where you might be concerned if you land in the Surf, or rig on a dock, about dropping that expensive tiller.

Al Russell 66451
 

Teeftie

New Member
my tiller used to be loose in the head when i had my old boat but now with my new boat it fits in perfectly, i would never worry about losing it, and iven if it does fall out you wont loose it, because it takes a lot to get it out from under a tight traveler and when most people sail unless there boat is equiped with auto-pilot they hold onto the extention anyways
 
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