Bent Deck Plate - Why???

Thread starter #1
Hi Folks,

A rather embarrassing post, but has anyone seen this before?

I've managed to bend my cunningham/outhaul deck plate twice now in two years. It happens in the exact same place (starboard side) and I simply have no idea how it occurred.

FYI - in picture, left block=cunningham; right=outhaul; shock=daggerboard cord; other = mast retainer

'Appreciate any insight/experience you might have to share!

Cheers
 

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#2
I myself dont sail lasers yet, but the guys at the club have this problem actually today this happened and =he snapped the ring too! it was heavy wind so i think the blocks could have been under stress but i cant say
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#3
Wow, that looks bad. A friend of mine got his plate bent somewhat like that, but it was on both sides and only half as much as that. We agreed it must have been a piece of defective material, but I don't know if that applies in your case because of the asymmetry. How much purchase do you have in your cunningham and outhaul?
 
#4
Wow, that looks bad. A friend of mine got his plate bent somewhat like that, but it was on both sides and only half as much as that. We agreed it must have been a piece of defective material, but I don't know if that applies in your case because of the asymmetry. How much purchase do you have in your cunningham and outhaul?
It was a guy at the club who bent his, tomorrow Morning if i remember i will check the purchase and report back to you
 
Thread starter #6
LaLi - Thanks for the response. Both vang and outhaul are the stock upgrade kits from Harken. I just can't imagine I did this with normal adjustments even under big breeze. Defective material was my conclusion the last time I did this. I'm second guessing this now.and $41 is a lot for these!
 
#8
Hi Folks,

A rather embarrassing post, but has anyone seen this before?

I've managed to bend my cunningham/outhaul deck plate twice now in two years. It happens in the exact same place (starboard side) and I simply have no idea how it occurred.

FYI - in picture, left block=cunningham; right=outhaul; shock=daggerboard cord; other = mast retainer

'Appreciate any insight/experience you might have to share!

Cheers
Yes, I had this happen. None of my deck fittings on my 20 year old Laser were reinforced. So I cut a few service ports in the deck and put in bolts with washers. I bent the bracket flat and rebolted the bracket to the deck and no more problems.
 

wjejr

Active Member
#9
I have little experience with Lasers, but it is hard to imagine the force of the cunningham or outhaul could do that. Is there any chance the mast retainer is getting caught somehow and then winding up and pulling on the fitting when you sheet out? The leverage on the boom when sheeting out would be huge at the axis/mast. If somehow the line got caught and wound up, I would think the force could bend anything.

The pictures I was just looking at online have the line running through the fitting rather than tied on, which I think is what you show (black w/yellow flecks). If the retainer did get caught up somehow, it would pull rather than run through.

Just guessing.
 

AlanD

Former ISAF Laser Measurer
#10
Mast retaining line is usually the culprit and it is because it is not rotating when the mast rotates or the result of capsizing. Personally I prefer using shock cord that rope.

These fittings have bent from day one when they were introduced. If they don't bend, you'll find the screws ripping out. There is nothing wrong with the quality of the stainless steal, 304 / 316 are both fairly low strength stainless steels. General corrosion issues with these materials are usually the result of the materials not being pickled particularly after welding, the solution is dipping the fitting into nitric to form the protective oxide layer.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#11
Feels like such a "no-brainer" after reading the previous two posts! Yes... if you use a non-elastic mast retainer, be sure you tie it when the mast leans forward, and then rotate the mast from one extreme to the other to see that the line stays slack in all positions.

Cheap fixes are the best.
 
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#12
I've bent mine also - and I'm sure it was the mast retainer. I had it tied loosely, but it always seems to jam itself. Any suggestions on the best tie-off method?
 
Thread starter #13
Hey Guys,

Bingo! I failed to share with you that Sunday morning my mainsheet stopper knot came loose. I proceeded to watch as it snaked its way out of the boom blocks. Before I knew it, the boom had rotated a full 180 degrees from center line and was directly out in front of my bow. I could see how this must have caused incredible torque on my non-elastic mast retainer and the deck plate material simply gave as designed.

Thanks again. Another testimonial to the power of this forum and sailing such an awesome boat.

Have a great week!
 
Thread starter #14
Brucebrad et. al: I'm going to try the setup below from Steve C. Looks pretty solid and clearly would have prevented my issues. He even demo's the full mast rotation!

 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
#15
Cockerill's system above must be the simplest possible, but it needs so much slack for the rotation that it lets the mast move vertically quite a bit before stopping it. Just thinking, how far can the mast come out before anything is likely to break? (Not something one would want to test in real life.)

My own retainer does two loops around the mast, once through the eyes on the deck plate and once above the vang fitting. The ends are tied together. I like it.

And by the way, if you want to lead the centreboard elastic the way it's done in the video above, it's simpler if you use a separate piece of line as a fairlead to attach the elastic to the deck plate.
 

AlanD

Former ISAF Laser Measurer
#18
I still prefer using shock cord for the retaining line as it gives a softer loading if the retaining line is utilised and is still taught enough to prevent the mast falling out. I form a single loop utilising both eyelets of the deck fitting and the loop needs to be slightly stretched in the neutral position when hooked over the vang tang. Rigging 8.JPG
 
Thread starter #19
The following new laser rigging video from the gang at West Coast Sailing shows another simple but seemingly effective option for mast retainer setup.

 
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