Baby Bob to the rescue - I hope!

#21
Carrnor:
Could you take a photo of the sleeve and post some measurements as well. I would like to add some flotation to the top of my mast and am would like to know how much I need.

Thanks
Roger
 
Thread starter #22
Roger,
In case Carrnor doesn't make it back here, there is a drawing of the sleeve in the C-14 manual. It shows the sleeve coming down 24" from the mainsail head and describes it as "1/2" of closed cell foam on each side encapsulated in sail cloth". How it attaches to the sail isn't really clear but I'm thinking a call to Catalina would resolve the question.

From what I could gather, if my calculations are correct, the sleeve would have about 10 lbs of displacement. That's only a third of the lift provided by the Baby Bob but who knows - it might be all you need even in the highest winds???

BTW, last Sunday I made a batch of Baby Bob brackets while making one for Carl. His is in the mail. If you want one, send me a private message.

I also came up with an alternative fastening method for anyone not wanting to drill a hole through the top of their mast. You will need to attach a couple of padeyes or hooks, one to each side of your mast, but that shouldn't be nearly as difficult. This method utilizes the extra holes in the Bob's stainless brackets where you thread a cord through and tie it off to the padeyes. Here's a picture illustrating the concept:



Hope this helps,
Jim
 
#23
Jim:
Thanks for the input. I am making my own smaller version of "babby Bob" and was trying to determine how much floatation I needed. My float gives aroound 14 pounds of boyancy force. If the float from Catalina gives 10 pounds then I should be good to go. I will measure my sail tonight and run the numbers to verify.

Thanks Again

Roger
 
#24
GREAT THREAD.
I turtled the WORST hobie cat in the world. This thing really sucked. I could not come about through the eye of the wind at all, I swear it was impossible. This thing fell over (I'm sensing a theme) when I was fiddling the the main sheets. The boat backed hard and just like that, jenny was gone. I looked up after I was ejected and dove to avoid a torrent of rigging from toppling upon me. But this thing turtled like a champ. I managed to right it once and the main was still cleated. :mad: And it didn't come up again. I found out later that the "sealed" mast and boom were only water tight when they were holding water. Righting it was going to be impossible after about ten minutes upside down. This was in the fall in Washington state, I was wearing a wetsuit and the adrenaline kept me warm.

So I sold that boat.

I just got my 1991 Catalina 14.2 Mod 1 yesterday and am worried about it taking on water if I capsize. So after reading this forum over I just ebayed a baby bob and I have one question:

Will the baby bob prevent a lot of water from getting into my hull or does will water get in there no matter what?

Thanks, my first boat was an 8 foot monohull and I liked that way better than any other boat I have sailed so far. Hopefully my catalina is the new favorite.
 
Thread starter #25
Unless you have a poor seal between the deck and hull, you shouldn't get any water in your boat. The C-14s are very buoyant and even laying on its side it rides very high.

Jim
 
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#26
Mine will sail full of water. The first time I turtled, the cuddy cover came off and it completely filled. We were able to right the boat, there is flotation under the seats, we were then able to bail most of the water out and started sailing it back to a beach, over 1/2 mile, to get the rest of the water out.

It will sail with water up to the top of the seats. It is sluggish and an interesting sail, but you can sail it. About 100 yards from the beach a ski boat decided to attempt to swamp us and put a 3 ft wake over our transom. That completely refilled the boat, but we were still able to sail it in.

So they are pretty seaworthy even full of water and mine was full. I just wish they would not turtle after capsizing. Just watch the winds you sail in. I have the most problems with turtling when the winds are over 17 knots.

The ski boat driver, was pulled over by the game warden. He saw the whole thing, arrested the boat driver, confiscated the boat, and talked about taking the guy's car. The guy was ticketed for boating while drunk, unsafer operation, not enough PFD's and endangerment to others on the water.

Kent
 
Thread starter #27
The ski boat driver, was pulled over by the game warden. He saw the whole thing, arrested the boat driver, confiscated the boat, and talked about taking the guy's car. The guy was ticketed for boating while drunk, unsafer operation, not enough PFD's and endangerment to others on the water.

Kent
What a great story! It goes to show there is some justice in this world after all! :)
 
#28
mmmmm, swift justice. There is a local lake that is just completely ruined during the summer by motor boats. I can't stand it. But everyone has to boat somewhere I guess.
Good to know that the 14.2 is safe, I never want my boat to turtle again.
 
#29
Hi Jim! I'd be interested in a mounting assembly if you are still willing and able to fabricate and ship it for a price that seems fair to you. Please send me a message if you are able.

Thanks.
Ben
 
#30
Hi Jim, do you still have -or- are you still willing to make the brackets? Thanks!
Since it doesn't take much more time to make ten brackets then it takes to make one, I'll go ahead and chop up most of the track I have in case anyone else wants to mount a Bob to the top of their mast. Making multiples will keep the cost down. You will still need to buy the 6 stainless screws/locknuts and here's the LINK to the clevis pin.

About the only tricky part is drilling the hole in the top of the mast for the clevis pin. I'll include some instructions for that with the bracket. Certainly, if drilling this hole gives you the creeps, it might pay to find someone with a drill press who can handle the job.
 
#31
Well, we didn't get out sailing yesterday. The honey-do list seemed to carry much more weight than the fun we would've had sailing in 2 knot winds. But I did get the Bob mounted and took some pictures for anyone else thinking of going that way.

I had some aluminum track left over from a sliding door installation which seemed to fit the Bob brackets perfectly once the roller flanges were sawed off. The first picture is a short section of the channel fitted to slide into the top of the mast.



The next picture is of the other channel assembled to the Bob and the plug, including the clevis pin which holds the whole thing to the top of the mast. I wanted a quick way to remove the Bob if the winds are light.



Below is a shot of the whole assembly installed on the mast top.



The last picture is a long shot to give everyone a sense of scale. It's not pretty, but if it stops us from turtling...



Of course, I could've just notched the Bob brackets to fit inside the mast top and skipped all the aluminum. I opted to go this way 'cause stainless steel is a lot harder to cut and drill than aluminum. I guess if you feel comfortable with such fabrication, leaving out the aluminum would be a more elegant solution.

Finally, even if I took the boat and purposely capsized it and it didn't turtle, this would not be definitive proof the Bob will prevent turtling in all situations. It's the wind that drives it over upsidedown. In our case, the winds were 24 knots. I can see higher winds pushing the boat over even with the Bob installed.:(

Hope this helps,
Jim
What do you do for a wind vane?
 
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#32
I realize that this thread is years and years old... I'm assuming that JGM no longer has these for sale, but I would love to see plans or a place to source the aluminum channel material that you used. This is a much more elegant solution than what I currently have.
 
#33
I realize that this thread is years and years old... I'm assuming that JGM no longer has these for sale, but I would love to see plans or a place to source the aluminum channel material that you used. This is a much more elegant solution than what I currently have.
I made mine from material bought at Lowe's. All you need is a flat bar of aluminum, a piece that's L shaped-or even a box shape and then a few stainless screws to put it all together...
 
#34
I just got mine last week and need to attach. I have seen a lot of ways to do this. The easiest is moving the brackets out on the baby bob so it fits the mast. I just have issue with drilling holes in some thing that is to keep me upright!

I guess if you sealed up the holes properly then this wouldn't be an issue?

Anyone else try this'
 
#35
Using the flat bar of aluminum, I bent it into a square U shape and then drilled holes so that it matched those for the pulley for the main sail. No need to seal it at all and really pretty easy. Once that bar was ready, then I attached the Lshaped pieces to the flat top of the bar with screws and the drilled holes for the Bob mounts and screwed them all together. I've capsized it already and it worked perfectly. No turtle at all :)
 
#36
I have mine attached to an oak "plug" that I cut to fit inside the mast and mounted the Bob to. It works alright, but I'm worried about the shearing force generated by going over on the very top of a pretty soft aluminum mast. The last time I went over, it went over quick (20+ kts, just the main, stupid, and I should have gone in) and it bent the mount, which is better than the mast I suppose. So, I'm modifying it using aluminum extrusion and aluminum strap, similar to what another forum member has done.

But, it works, and I'm very happy to have it up there. The lake I sail on is very large, and has winds that are hilariously variable. When the Capri gets knocked over, so much of it is riding out of the water that I worry in a strong enough wind even with the bob it could still turtle. I don't own a motorboat (or know anyone with one) to help with a turtle recovery, and I'm always out there by myself, so it's something I want to avoid at all costs. When I replace my bob mount I'm going to also work on resealing the mast and replacing the foam that's in it.

I appreciate all the information and help I've received on this form in a very short amount of time.

Next task - tackling what I think is a rotted out board under the mast step. I'm being hopeful (and naive) that the screws are just loose, but I seriously doubt it. Fortunately, there's lots of information about that on these forums as well.
 
#37
Phatom - is the pic in this thread yours?
Optimist mast floats | Page 2 | SailingForums.com

I see how you bent the aluminum to fit over the top of the mast. Looks like you then have a piece of channeled aluminum attached to that and then the baby bob to the channel aluminum

Is that correct? Seems easy enough.

What thickness of aluminum did you use?

Thanks for the help. I want to get out on the water this weekend but definitely want this in place first.
 
#38
Phatom - is the pic in this thread yours?
Optimist mast floats | Page 2 | SailingForums.com

I see how you bent the aluminum to fit over the top of the mast. Looks like you then have a piece of channeled aluminum attached to that and then the baby bob to the channel aluminum

Is that correct? Seems easy enough.

What thickness of aluminum did you use?

Thanks for the help. I want to get out on the water this weekend but definitely want this in place first.

It is :)

It was easy, I did it in about 1 1/2 hours. All of the aluminum I bought at Lowe's and it looks like the L channel is just under 1/8th of an inch thick and the flat bar was 1/8 inch thick. Don't leave home without it! :)
 
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