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Another mast step repair thread :)

fubar

New Member
Pickup a 2xxxx series hull. 20lbs overweighted. Mast step drinks a cup of scotch in matter of seconds. No inspection port installed.
Ordered an 8" port online, will power up the jigsaw once in. What do I expect from opening up the hull after 45 years?
 

fubar

New Member
Well, no magic mushroom inside. My kid is yelling "save the turtles" when I dig out all the crap from inside.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
Now, question. Why the hell nobody put inspection port on the transom???
Answer: because class rule 20 says, "Inspection ports... may be installed on the deck or in the cockpit to provide access to the hull cavity..."

Counterquestion: what sense would it make?

_
 

Jason Rucker

Active Member
Pickup a 2xxxx series hull. 20lbs overweighted. Mast step drinks a cup of scotch in matter of seconds. No inspection port installed.
Ordered an 8" port online, will power up the jigsaw once in. What do I expect from opening up the hull after 45 years?
I hope you didn’t pay money for the hull. Always do a mast step test before buying. If it leaks then pass. There are too many decent hulls out there. Unless it’s free and you enjoy projects.
 

fubar

New Member
Answer: because class rule 20 says, "Inspection ports... may be installed on the deck or in the cockpit to provide access to the hull cavity..."

Counterquestion: what sense would it make?

_
I need to re-read the rules again.... thanks bud.
 

fubar

New Member
I hope you didn’t pay money for the hull. Always do a mast step test before buying. If it leaks then pass. There are too many decent hulls out there. Unless it’s free and you enjoy projects.
paid couple hundred bucks, only able to do a knocking test all around, dry deck and hull is that all I know.
 

DiMoCA

New Member
How could you tell the hull was dry? I just bought an '82 Alcort and god knows what's in there. Without an inspection port I certainly don't.
 

fubar

New Member
How could you tell the hull was dry? I just bought an '82 Alcort and god knows what's in there. Without an inspection port I certainly don't.
There is a moist meter you can get for hull, they do work...Costed me few hundred bucks maybe 15 years ago to make me sleep better. But after playing with it for some time, I say a few bucks hammer + some white hair can do the job. Kinda like grandma way to picking watermelon, slight tap everywhere and wet core will sound different. You will need to know where studs, bulkhead and all.

If you have the boat now, shoot water thru the drain plug, and see what comes out. If any brownlish crap pee out, order a inspection port and make a hole on your deck.
 

kellymac24

New Member
Pour water in it to see how far down it drains to if it’s all the way then it’s worn through the bottom, then flush the boat with fresh water and get the boat totally dry (probably will take a good week, then with glass mat make 3 circles progressively larger with then smallest the size of the step, very carefully send them to the bottom of the step as centered as possible, then make sure it’s flat against the bottom as best as possible youll probably use more resin than usual (wrap an old batton end in wax paper works). If it looks like the mast step may be worn through towards the bow take 2 strips half the circumference of the step by about 3” and apply them to the inside of the step as well. Good luck
 

adamlaser

New Member
A little late now, but a couple hundred vs 1k for a hull makes a massive difference in quality. There are some good deals for around 1k, but some absolute LEMONS for a couple hundred
 

fubar

New Member
Too late indeed. After inspection port, blow dry for a week, patch the hell around the donut, now down to 142 lbs. Yup, some 40 yrs old water in the cracked bottles. Bailer added, deck plate and cleats, 15:1 vang, boom sleeve. Dust up the garage sanding, keeping lemon hull colour just for the sake of it. At least I can save a few bucks on sail numbers. But yes, a newer hull next time around for sure. Hey, this is what a noob does.
 

Laser41420

New Member
It has probably worn through the bottom of the mast step as well, I usually cut a fibreglass disk (sanded smooth) out of the bit of deck removed for the hatch hole, pour in about 25 ml of epoxy resin and drop in in.

The epoxy levels out the bottom of the mast step plus fills any cracks and the fibreglass disk acts as a new floor. Just make sure the hull is level by using a spirit level across the top of the mast step and that the fibreglass disk is a loose fit i.e. it does not get stuck halfway down.

I usually add about 3 layers of fibreglass tape wrapped around the base of the mast step inside the hull as well, preferably glued with epoxy resin.

Steve
 

fubar

New Member
It has probably worn through the bottom of the mast step as well, I usually cut a fibreglass disk (sanded smooth) out of the bit of deck removed for the hatch hole, pour in about 25 ml of epoxy resin and drop in in.

The epoxy levels out the bottom of the mast step plus fills any cracks and the fibreglass disk acts as a new floor. Just make sure the hull is level by using a spirit level across the top of the mast step and that the fibreglass disk is a loose fit i.e. it does not get stuck halfway down.

I usually add about 3 layers of fibreglass tape wrapped around the base of the mast step inside the hull as well, preferably glued with epoxy resin.

Steve
Yes, it did grind thru. If you look close, there is a small hole at the conner of mast step, where water came out. I duct taped vaccum there to suck acetone out pouring from top, and glass taping inside the tube from above, very dark coal mine to work with.

So tempted to cut up a hockey stick and glue a tripod to support the tube, eh!
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Reading that post from Laser41420 reminds me of using a flat rubber donut (or thick rubber washer) to "pad" the mast step where long-term rotation of the mast had begun to wear the glass of the step. This donut or washer may have been an automotive part, it had kicked around our tool cabinet for years... really tough rubber compound, barely flexible, and long-lasting too. One day---and I can't recall whether this was with the Laser or the Minifish---I grabbed that donut and tried it in the mast step, as I had noticed the glass in the step beginning to wear. The thing fit perfectly! ;)

I used a Louisville Slugger to push it down into place, didn't even need any resin or glue or anything, and the hole in the center ensured drainage when the hull was flipped. Had that thing in there for years, I guess it was sold with whichever boat, but it was some tough rubber compound... didn't hinder mast rotation though, and it also worked almost like a shock absorber in the step, so the mast didn't slam the glass in the step while hammering through wicked chop, or soaring over a wake and having the hull come down a bit harder than I expected, LOL. :confused:

Good point though from Laser41420, using a freshly-cut glass disk & some resin to "install" a new step floor. I only tried the donut or washer because it was there, ya know? And it actually worked, LOL. Of course, it was NOT soft rubber, it was some tough compound that was practically bulletproof... I think it was some sort of automotive part. Meh, it worked great for a long time, and it didn't cost me anything either, just a few seconds with the Slugger to push the donut into place. I reckon one could find such a donut or thick flat rubber washer in an auto parts catalog or maybe an industrial warehouse. :rolleyes:

THAT'S ALL I GOT, JUST WANTED TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE GOOD TIP REGARDING THE MAST STEP... CHEERS!!! :cool:

Edit: Oh, yeah, on a different occasion I also recall simply pouring catalyzed resin into the step to add protection, but the rubber donut or washer actually worked better, go figure. Now that I think about it, this donut or thick flat washer was reinforced with some sort of tough material, which also leads me to believe it was some sort of automotive part. I just Googled "reinforced rubber washer or donut" and came up with some stuff that looked similar, including high-temp pipe gaskets, LOL. Hard to say exactly what that thing was after all these years, but it worked like gangbusters... :)
 
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Laser41420

New Member
Best long term solution is to add the wear tapes to the mast (cheap from APS in the USA) and a sacrificial plastic disk dropped into the bottom of the mast step, result is no wear in your laser mast step ever!:) The mast leans a bit towards the gooseneck because of the weight of the rig so without the wear strips it grinds into the front area of the bottom of the mast step and the back at deck level.:eek: Aluminium is softer than fibreglass so the mast gets worn as well.:(
 

Cactus Cowboy

Well-Known Member
Good to know about the disk, I'll make a point of using one next time I buy a boat... I only tried the reinforced rubber washer or donut because it was there in the tool cabinet (tall wooden closet built into the garage). It worked great too, no complaints... and it only makes sense to add some protection to the greatest pinpoint stress location aboard the boat. Stress in more ways than one, if you catch my drift. ;)

I don't buy a dirt bike without tricking it out and adding or upgrading components... I see no reason why things should be any different with a sailboat, LOL. :cool:
 

Laser41420

New Member
APS gone? That's a real shame mind you I have not bought anything from them since they went over to expensive courier shipping. When they used the US post global shipping pack ($9?) it was worth buying half a dozen mast wear strip packs even in the UK.
 

fubar

New Member
Sand, right... We do need engineers to design boats. This boat indeed snapped together in a weekend during drinking.
 
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