Adding cleat on mast for halyard

L&VW

Well-Known Member
#4
No mast cleat here, but related questions.

1) Should the mast cleat loosen, what do you do?

2) Anyone tried polypropylene line?

A Sunfish I bought came with 1/8" polypropylene. 'Tough on the hands so I replaced it with a cheap braided nylon line. But the replaced 1/8" line was slick through the guides, and with two extra turns on the deck cleat, held fast. :confused:
 
#5
Do I have to use aluminum rivets or are stainless steel screws OK?
thanks
roland
Both are an option when used correctly.
- Aluminium rivets are best when you want to 100% avoid galvanic corrosion. No matter sailing salt, fresh or brackish water. Salt water just has a faster galvanic reaction then brackish or fresh.
- You can use Stainless Steel screws but you want to (try to) avoid contact between the dissimilar metals. In other applications you can suffice with nylon washers or sealant between metals. In this case use Tefgel.

No mast cleat here, but related questions.

1) Should the mast cleat loosen, what do you do?

2) Anyone tried polypropylene line?

A Sunfish I bought came with 1/8" polypropylene. 'Tough on the hands so I replaced it with a cheap braided nylon line. But the replaced 1/8" line was slick through the guides, and with two extra turns on the deck cleat, held fast.
1) My vote is to fix it. Keep using it will "open" the holes in mast more, making future repair more extensive.
- Pop rivets; drill out, clean surface, cleat and holes. reattach.
- Screws; remove, clean surface, cleat and holes. Since it's loose while using screws, the holes are bigger than the screws. See if you can use thicker screws or use the same size but also attach it on a bed of 3m 4200.

2) I don't. I sail in the Caribbean and the sun is too aggressive for PolyProp. Either way, I prefer Dyneema as a halyard. Light weight, no stretch, doesn't absorb on water.

Ps. Another tip I found about the mast cleat on this forum: Put a piece of rough sandpaper on the mast sand the cleat on it. This will give your cleat the curve of the mast for a better load spread.
 
Thread starter #7
Both are an option when used correctly.
- Aluminium rivets are best when you want to 100% avoid galvanic corrosion. No matter sailing salt, fresh or brackish water. Salt water just has a faster galvanic reaction then brackish or fresh.
- You can use Stainless Steel screws but you want to (try to) avoid contact between the dissimilar metals. In other applications you can suffice with nylon washers or sealant between metals. In this case use Tefgel.



1) My vote is to fix it. Keep using it will "open" the holes in mast more, making future repair more extensive.
- Pop rivets; drill out, clean surface, cleat and holes. reattach.
- Screws; remove, clean surface, cleat and holes. Since it's loose while using screws, the holes are bigger than the screws. See if you can use thicker screws or use the same size but also attach it on a bed of 3m 4200.

2) I don't. I sail in the Caribbean and the sun is too aggressive for PolyProp. Either way, I prefer Dyneema as a halyard. Light weight, no stretch, doesn't absorb on water.

Ps. Another tip I found about the mast cleat on this forum: Put a piece of rough sandpaper on the mast sand the cleat on it. This will give your cleat the curve of the mast for a better load spread.
Sanding on the mast makes sense, would have never thought of that
 
#8
Can this cleat be used with the two halyard system? Can it handle two lines? Do you need different line diameters?
I'm not familiar with the 2 halyard system but am with the clamcleat. The unique feature of the one you're referring to is that it has a side entry. For the rest it has the same function and use of the regular one.
I don't recommend it for use of multiple lines. To hold the line properly it needs to "sink in" as deep as possible in the groove for the teeth to have a proper hold. The line on top will slip.
You can go thinner in line but might cause problems when you bounce on the waves.
 
#9
Can this cleat be used with the two halyard system? Can it handle two lines? Do you need different line diameters?
Yes you can, yes it does, and yes you do! This is how I have mine rigged. The first line I put in is the jens halyard. I wish I could tell you its diameter but I don't know it. It just barely holds. Either a slightly thicker halyard or shimming the cleat away from the mast would probably help. The second, main halyard is thicker and cleats nicely on top. When you need to go to the jens, you just pop the main halyard and off you go!
 
#11
Make sure the halyard still cleats to the hull at some point, as that is your means of mast retention. For a high-load cleat I would recommend using stainless rivets. Despite the potential for galvanic action, they will hold better and longer than aluminum rivets (which loosen up after just a few sails in my experience), and will be easier to remove and snug up than stainless screws in the long run.

One of my boats has a bunch of stainless screws in its spars and, despite my best efforts, I cannot get them out without damaging the spars, leaving me with extra, outdated hardware that I absolutely hate to deal with on the water.

Stainless rivets are the way to go IMHO.
 
#12
PS: to clarify, the reason the stainless screws will not come out is that they have corroded themselves to the spars on the inside. I would have to cut away the surrounding aluminum to get them out. Do NOT do this if you want to keep your spars in good shape.
 
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