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Added a Laser to my flotilla

Mashmaster

Active Member
In addition to my 4 Sunfish boats (all project boats) I just bought a Laser from a local college. There is only 2 things that I see that I need to fix ASAP. The bottom gudeon is broken and needs replacing and there is a tear in the deck fiberglass. I am thinking of putting in a hatch on the side of the cockpit to get to the underneath of the tear. Or I could just put a hatch where the tear is (yes I know that is cheating). What is under that portion of the boat?

It is a 1974 Laser

Wood daggerboard
Wood Rudder
Brand new sail (intensity so not class legal I know)

we are still going through the rigging to ensure we have everything.

The hull is orange and seems to be painted on? I am assuming someone did that years ago. Would you sand the bottom and reapply gel coat? or paint it? I is black under the orange and yellow under the black. Are those paint layers?

Pictures in this google album:
Laser
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
Picture by picture:

The inspection port location is one of the worst ever seen. Is there an ID code on the transom? If not, then the hull number is gone, with the piece of the deck that the port displaced. The horn cleat isn't legal, doesn't even look very strong, and attached to the weakest possible point. Multiple stupidity.

The punctured deck may not be as bad as it looks. There's another fibreglass skin and a foam core in between there. If it doesn't leak, then the inner skin is intact and you don't need to (and shouldn't!) go to "the underneath". A piece of duct tape is all you need to go sailing. For a permanent solution, you'd want to consult Fred Schroth, as you're apparently located in Gouvernail Country :D

The control line cleats are very illegally fitted. (More on that later if you want.)
The "new" blue centreboard brake may wear out quite fast and possibly damage the board.
The "integrated" sheet cleat is actually legal, but doesn't probably work that well. Needs to be tested.

What are the "extra" screws next to the rudder fittings? You could take them off and fill the holes, as they're obviously not doing anything.
The drain bung may be attached to a gudgeon but not the hull (and not with a snap hook).

The orange colour looks original at first, but yes, it's a yellow boat that was black at some point! For quick cosmetic fixes, add some more orange to cover the other colours; for any more extensive paint jobs, consult Fred again.

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Mashmaster

Active Member
Ouch! At least I got this hull for a donation to the college sailing team. Did I just get a hull that is not worth the repairs necessary? This will be a practice boat, I assume never will be class legal.

Yeah, I figured this is a project boat. The inspection port through me off too. I suppose I could put remove the port and patch the hole. pretty big hole to patch. I certainly can remove the horn cleat. I am guessing whoever put it in to connect to a mooring ball.

There is a hull number that is how I knew it was a 1974 boat. It is PSL 17878 0874

My son sails FJs out of the yacht club that Fred is a member of, he recognized the name when I mentioned it to him. We haven't met but I have heard he really knows what he is doing.

I am not sure what you mean by the illegal control lines. And we didn't understand the purpose of the swivel cam cleat so we were planning on removing that.

I'll remove the extra screws when I replace the broken gudeon.

I will see if I can track down Fred for hands on advice, unless he thinks I should just drop it off at the dump instead.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
So it's sail number 17878, built in August 1974 in San Rafael, CA. Had it been built a few months earlier, then the number would have been under the bow eye...

I'm not totally sure if the port takes the hull out of the class. I wouldn't go to the trouble of patching the hole (unless Fred thinks otherwise :D ), but I might glue the hatch in place (with just a little silicone so you can open it if you really need to) and switch the horn cleat to the Allen A134. At least it would look more "lasery" :rolleyes:

The cunningham and outhaul cleats, as well as their turning blocks by the mast, should be attached to standard (builder-supplied) plates, not directly to the deck. The swivel cleat on your boat is apparently for the vang, and shouldn't be there. (Interestingly though, the original plan in 1999 was to lead the vang, too, to the deck. I believe it wasn't done because Vanguard opposed it - they thought the deck wasn't strong enough.)

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Mashmaster

Active Member
My plan for the rigging was to take it to my sons' sailing coach who is a Laser fanatic to have him go over the rigging. My son when he first looked at the boat said where is the Xd block.... So we will be learning.
 

LaLi

Well-Known Member
where is the Xd block
:D That would be the vang cleating fitting on the mast... To be honest, I don't think it makes much sense to spend a lot of money on that boat - whatever new stuff you need to get, go for the less expensive but still legal alternatives. The vang is a good example; of course the old Allen cleat block doesn't work as well as the newer ones, but the cost/benefit ratio is unbeatable. The risk with consulting a "Laser fanatic" (such as myself :D ) is that they want to go all-"XD" on every boat.

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LaLi

Well-Known Member
The "integrated" sheet cleat is actually legal, but doesn't probably work that well. Needs to be tested.
No need to test - now that I took a closer look at the pictures, it's clearly not a ratchet block that the cleat is integrated with. So you need to switch that to a ratcheting one (without a cleat), and after that the choice is whether to mount sheet cleats on the side decks, or to have no cleats at all.

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