What's new

1963 Wooden Sunfish

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Kent,
Looks like it's screwed from under the deck. Also two screws join it where to two sides come together forming the 'V''.
Thanks! I have a fitting coming and I'll probably fashion a backer to screw to deck and attach splashguard to that...or make people scream by screwing on a fiberglass coaming :)
 

Wavedancer

Upside down?
Staff member
Not a connoisseur, but the splashguard on Andy's boat is different from the one on Clark's wooden Sunfish. As I vaguely recall, the shape on Clark's boat is original (and a pain in the butt). True or not?
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Not a connoisseur, but the splashguard on Andy's boat is different from the one on Clark's wooden Sunfish. As I vaguely recall, the shape on Clark's boat is original (and a pain in the butt). True or not?
The original 1953 splashguard was long and curved back past the cockpit, no hiking out or it would be a pain :)
The cockpit also had holes in the frame that could let water into the inside of the hull if you took a big wave or capsized. By 1963 for later wooden models they tried to seal up the cockpit so water could not get inside the hull, added drain plugs on the fore and aft deck and made a much shorter V shaped splashguard (the "mustache"). They also beveled the corners of the frames inside the hull so water that got inside could move from frame to frame and drain out at deck drains and not be trapped inside. I've been told that most of thee wooden boats rotted from the inside out.
 

danpal

Active Member
That would be a true statement since that's what happened to mine. All I have left are my mast, sail and spars. My dagger board and rudder are at the bottom of lake Sebago and the hull completely rotted after many attempts to restore it.
 
That would be a true statement since that's what happened to mine. All I have left are my mast, sail and spars. My dagger board and rudder are at the bottom of lake Sebago and the hull completely rotted after many attempts to restore it.
Hmmm. I like to get it out and sail it a couple times a year, but maybe better to keep it stored? It does take on a few quarts of water the first time out each year, but its easy enough to sponge out, and after a couple days takes on very little....
 

signal charlie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
That would be a true statement since that's what happened to mine. All I have left are my mast, sail and spars. My dagger board and rudder are at the bottom of lake Sebago and the hull completely rotted after many attempts to restore it.
Do you still have remnants of the hull? I was thinking that one could be copied and rebuilt piece by piece by looking at kit instructions and interpolating the homebuilt Sailfish prints? You'd have to learn to scarf plywood together, cut frames, kerf the chine etc...and spend a lot to have a wooden boat that could rot again...and be rebuilt again....
 

danpal

Active Member
No, it was cut up and tossed. My father was fed up with me keeping it in the garage. It was moved to the backyard when I went to college where it died a quick death. I originally bought it from a friend who was having a yard sale so I didn't have the original plans.
 
Question about possibility of racing.... Our club has an 'around the lake' race each year on Labor Day to end the racing season. I wouldn't race this boat in a regular club race... Too crowded, but this is a much longer race, and we're much more spread out. Anyway, I think it would neat to do, but wouldn't have a prayer with a 99.6 Portsmouth. Would there be a rating for a boat like this?
 
Top