1950s Alcort Super Sailfish ZSA ZSA Restoration

signal charlie

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Thread starter #1
We are chiseling some damaged and extra bits off of our 1950s Alcort Super Sailfish ZSA ZSA. The bottom needed replacement and there was unneeded foam in the interior, and some heavy extra framing as well. We will get her back down to her fighting weight and use this as prep to tackle a 1963 wooden Sunfish CHIP that is waiting in the wings. We'll be taking measurements along the way and develop lines and a Table of Offsets.

Full story on our small boat restoration blog or facebook page.

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signal charlie

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Thread starter #4
Well we got the extra bits removed and put a new butt block under the deck panel joint. Thickened epoxy repair to the keel beam and then 2 coats of TotalBoat Wet Edge BluGlo White ro seal up the interior, after we sanded it.

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Cut out bottom panels from marine grade A/B plywood, rough fit and presetting the bend with straps per Capn Jack's direction. There is a little keel down the middle that acts as a spacer, and it will cover the plywood edge.

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Keyed scarf joint, carefully dredged out with a circular saw set to 1/16th inch, then cleaned up with a jack plane and rabbet plane.

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For More Info (FMI) check out ZSA ZSA's restoration blog.
 
#6
I second that opinion... always cool to bring an old boat back to life, somehow she seems grateful whenever I do it, kinda like rescuing an animal instead of buying one from a breeder. :rolleyes:

Keep up the good work, SC, I'm still on the hunt for a small sailboat but I have my eye on an Albacore 15, just gotta work out a price with the seller... :confused:
 

signal charlie

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Thread starter #7
BB, the kerf is probably around 3/16th of an inch, so you could make 10 passes or so and clean it out. I cut the first two strips on the measure line then did kind of a sweep back and forth to the edge, routerish and that cleaned it out also.
 

signal charlie

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Thread starter #12
Stanley #5 jack plane and 60 grit to smooth the scarf joints.
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TotalBoat epoxy fairing compound to cover the nail heads and scarf joint. Mix equal parts until green.

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mixmkr

Active Member
#14
Do you like that DeWalt random orbit sander? I just ordered one, instead of another FEiN or Festool (too dang expensive). I've got a Dust Deputy that I'm hooking mine up to, in front of my shop vac. Google Dust Deputy, if you haven't heard of it. Amazing item...easy to make should you be inclined too.
 

mixmkr

Active Member
#15
Looks like you started out on your Port chine, with a regular single part filler using a red MEK crème hardener...then switched to your Total Boat epoxy ?.....(I've never used that)
 

signal charlie

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Thread starter #16
1) I like the DeWalt, it has held up great so far and didn't cost much. I used Craftsman for several years, and went through several of them burning out the bearings. They had a one year guarantee so I got several free ones, but it was irritating to stop during a job to go track another one down. Most of my hand power tools are DeWalt, multi oscillating tool, jigsaw, random orbital sander, 13 inch thickness planer and compact trim router. Belt sander is Black and Decker. Chop saw and table 10 inch saw are Ryobi. Circular saw Kobalt. Drill press Craftsman. Hand drill and spiral saw Skil. ANd a very interesting 4 inch Left Handed ciircular saw from Rockwell. Latest thing we added was a Work Sharp 3000 power sharpener.

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2) I was wondering if anyone was going to notice the fairing compound. I used the green TotalFair all the way around, but started trimming and belt sanding the port side panel before the compound was dry, so that is a mix of sawdust and red paint from the side panel. I trimmed as close as I dared with the DeWalt multi oscillating tool with a flush cut blade, it made quick work of the plywood, then hit a few areas with the jack plane, but mostly ran the belt sander around flush on the side.

3) And look close at the Starboard side edge, see the little jog in about 2 1/2 feet back? I tacked the panels on, fit them and marked the side onto the bottom panel. Then took them off and rough trimmed them with a jigsaw, trying to stay about a heavy half inch away from the line, leaving the edge proud for final trim after installation. I must have fallen asleep there because I cut a hair inside the line! I had to fudge on that panel installation to angle it out a bit, you'll notice at the bow that the panel is not under the keel strip. After final trim a little dab of thickened epoxy will fix that boo boo and then be primed and painted, only me and you will know. Otherwise it would have been back to the lumber store for another $75 sheet of marine grade plywood. Maybe I'll slide a little wedge of ply in there, but the stem has a lot of repair THIXO there anyway from the rot repair we did, I kind of like her having the bionic nose.

I'll reference you back to one of my Boatbuilding criteria, the Great Spirit criteria.
"My Native American criteria is that only the Great Spirit can make something perfect, so it is best to leave small mistakes in the work as tribute. Plus if your boat gets stolen and recovered by the authorities, you'll be able to point out all the mistakes to them as proof of buildership. That is of course, unless they point all of them out to you first."

See all Criteria

Cheers
Kent and Audrey
 

signal charlie

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Staff member
Thread starter #17
Your query cost me $114.47, just ordered a Dust Deputy, it looks handy to keep shop dust down. I could have been out there sanding in the shop yesterday while it rained but I like to roll the boats outside to sand. Most of the time I hook up the shop vac to the DA or belt sander but there is still a lot of dust escaping, a full bag to empty, etc...

...and I suppose I'll need a new shop vac, bearing shot in the old one, from dust, lots of fiberglass work.

As for that left handed saw, set the blade to minimum depth and it will cut a nice curve. Dust collection port picks up almost everything. The left handed blade makes it easy to see the cut line, but be careful, there is not much saw between the blade and body parts. I moved it wrong once and it backed up on me, I should have had the work piece secured better and been standing back a bit. The blade sucked the tail of my work shirt into it before I released the trigger and nicked my pants, too close to the femoral artery. I was not cut but got an important learning lesson.

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L&VW

Well-Known Member
#19
As for that left handed saw, set the blade to minimum depth and it will cut a nice curve. Dust collection port picks up almost everything. The left handed blade makes it easy to see the cut line, but be careful, there is not much saw between the blade and body parts. I moved it wrong once and it backed up on me, I should have had the work piece secured better and been standing back a bit. The blade sucked the tail of my work shirt into it before I released the trigger and nicked my pants, too close to the femoral artery. I was not cut but got an important learning lesson.
I always thought the "Skil" saw was invented by a left-handed person. Now I see the danger inherent in left-handed cutting with hand-held circular saws.

'Wonder how left-handers safely handle the "wrong-handed", but extremely common, "Skil" saw?
.
 
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