To Furl or Not to Furl

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by Utah Sail, Aug 22, 2009.

  1. Utah Sail

    Utah Sail New Member

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    I am considering adding a drum furler for the Jib. Is there a down side to this? It appears that all that is needed is a small boat furler from Harken, a 14 " Jib penant, and a furling line. My sail already has the furling jib luff wire. Did I miss any thing? My only concern is how is the jib tensioned other than the luff wire acts as the forstay? Is there a trade off in performance over the non furling jib configuration?
     
  2. EGarcia

    EGarcia New Member

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    Does Harken also include the swivel? Plus, you may want to consider adding a guide within a few inches of the drum. It will work alot smoother. Also make sure you have a cleat on the mast to secure the furling line. I have not sailed enough to speak about the performance.

    Ed
     
  3. Utah Sail

    Utah Sail New Member

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    You can buy the drum and swivel as a package or you can buy them seperatly. What is this guide you spoke of? Is it a guide just off the drum to guide the furling line?

    Dan
     
  4. EGarcia

    EGarcia New Member

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    The correct name for the guide is a "fairlead". I added a bullseye fairlead and screwed it to the center of the bow. They are designed for minor direction changes in a line. I actually saw it installed on a Capri in the show room in Austin. It cost about $3 and will add life to the line as well as reduce the friction
     
  5. Utah Sail

    Utah Sail New Member

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    Thanks for the suggestion, I'll look for one and order it when I order the other components.

    Dan
     
  6. Utah Sail

    Utah Sail New Member

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    To Furl or not to Furl That is the question

    I'd still like folks to weigh in on whether it is the right thing to add a Furling System. My sailing experience is limited to catamaran sailing on western lakes. The wind can change direction and intensity in a heart beat and the ability to furl the jib when things really start to blow is a great convienience and can mean the difference between a safe escape from the lake and ending up upside down. Maybe I am asking a question that the answer is just obvious. Anyone want to venture an opinion.
     
  7. gregwcoats

    gregwcoats Member

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    I have a 28 foot Columbia as well as my Capri 14.2 and they both have roller furling. I cannot imagine not have it on either boat, as I sail solo almost all the time. It is my understanding that racers that have roller furling, remove it when they race the boat, I am not sure why this is but that is what I hear. It may be because racing sails are much more "crisp" than day sailing sails and perhaps the racing sails won't roll up a well. My two cents worth is go with the roller furling, without question.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. ross ellena

    ross ellena Member

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    Furling Jib

    The basic performance difference is that the jib luff tension on the furling jib cannot be adjusted, thus the furling jibs are not the best for racing.
    If your jib has a forestay wire sewn in, then it was probably intended for a furling setup.
    The non-furling jibs snap onto the forestay and have the halyard rigged to allow luff tension adjustment under sail.
    Ross
     
  9. Utah Sail

    Utah Sail New Member

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    Thank you. I appreciate the comments.

    Dan
     
  10. sailorlem

    sailorlem Member

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    Love my furlers

    I have had furlers on previous boats but not on my present 14.2. I plan to install one soon. With proper gear, luff can be adjusted with furlering jib.
     
  11. jerinaldi

    jerinaldi Member

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    I've got a Harken furler on my '89 Mod 2 and love it. I think it is original equipment.

    I've got no idea what the part is called, but at the top of the sail it's got the same rig as on the shrouds, a 4-inch long "U" shaped piece of metal with a series of holes through it to accomodate a moveable pin, so tension can be adjusted that way, if necessary, but not adjusted while you are underway. I just keep mine set where it is not too hard to step the mast, but still has decent tension (I don't race).

    Unlike some other furlers I have seen on bigger boats, my furler is a single line (as opposed to a loop) so the only thing to be sure of is that the line is properly adjusted before to attach your jib sheet(s). You'll need enough line to get back to the cockpit when it is unfurled and also enough to roll in the entire sail. Otherwise, you will either (a) lose your line inside the furler when you unfurl, or (2) still have half your jib flapping in the wind when you roll up the sail. Don't ask me how I know this.
     
  12. regularman

    regularman New Member

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    I am cheap and so made my own furler because I had access to a machine shop. Nothing like having that furler when a storm rolls in. Just pull it in and 1/3 of your sail area is gone, much less panic and screaming with that.
     
  13. fan

    fan Member

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    With the furler you won't point as high upwind but for day sailing its great. Get the furler and you'll be happy.
     
  14. regularman

    regularman New Member

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    In my experience, you can furl the jib and sail on main alone and point much closer to the wind than with any jib. Jib luffs way before the main.
     
  15. fan

    fan Member

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    If that was the case, no one would use a jib, but its not. I would be happy to be in a C14.2 with main and jib with you in another C14.2 with just a main sailing upwind. I'd get there 1st every time. Even if you think you're pointing higher you're going forward slower and slipping sideways faster. Anyway, its all about the furler and I suggested the op get one and they'ed be happy...Right?
     
  16. regularman

    regularman New Member

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    absolutely, it was the best move ever made on that boat of mine. Real stress reducer.
     
  17. c14_Len

    c14_Len New Member

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    New Sailor with furling question

    I am a new sailer and new to this group. Hello all.
    I just purchased a Capri 14 and had it out for the first time. Great fun! I didn't know how to use the furling jib though. I attached the jib to the mast and then to the Harken furler. I didn't understand how to get the sail to furl and unfurl. When I pulled on the thin line to the furler, nothing happened.
    I noticed that the furler does not have a spring of any kind. It is just a black can shaped thing with a rope attached.
    Any advise that you folks can offer would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank You,
    Len
     
  18. jerinaldi

    jerinaldi Member

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    Think of it this way, the jib sheets unfurl the sail and the little line furls it.

    I know it's a bad practice, but I store my jib wrapped around the halyard. So, when I step the mast, I connect the furled jib. I also make sure that the furler has enough line wrapped around it so that I will have something to grab onto once the jib is unfurled. To unfurl, I pull on the leeward sheet. That sucks the line up into the furler. To furl, I let the sheets go slack and pull the line on the furler, wrapping that bad-boy right up.
     
  19. ross ellena

    ross ellena Member

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    furling issue

    If you have a loose rig, the furling drum is not held rigid and can be difficult to spin.
    If this occurs, sheet the main to harden the forestay and then the drum will furl more easily. Mine does not work well unless the main is sheeted.
    RRE
     
  20. regularman

    regularman New Member

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    You got to have the jib all the way unfurled and out when you connect the furler when it is all wound up tight, that way as you pull the line out it rolls up the sail. You guys would laugh to see how I store my jib. I did not like the way it furled upon itself so I slid a slit piece of thin walled pvc pipe over part of the sail with the cable in it. As a result the jib cannot be folded up and stored in a bag, I store it inside a 2 1/2 inch piece of schedule 40 pcv pipe with an end cap on one end and a cleanout plug on the other and just slide the rolled up jib inside and carry that along with my mast and boom.
     

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