Tiller Tamer Plans, Photo, and Instructions

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by KingJPW, Feb 23, 2012.

  1. KingJPW

    KingJPW New Member

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    Here are the plans and a photo for my Tiller Tamer implementation.

    Parts Required:
    2 Screw Eye Bolts
    1 S-Hook
    1 Jam Cleat
    Various line
    Total cost should be under $15

    The key to this design is that the shock cord travels over the tiller and therefore avoids entangling with the stuff below.

    1) You may wish to experiment with the lengths of line and shock cord.
    2) Make sure that 'Line A' doesn't jam when going through the Eye Bolt. I used 4mm line here.
    3) Try to achieve full movement of the S-hook through it's maximum travel.
    4) Make sure the first Screw Eye is no closer than 13 1/2" from end, or it will hit the transom and inhibit full movement of the rudder.
    5) To disassemble, simply remove 'Line A' from the S-Hook and leave in the boat. The tiller and rudder assembly can then be removed.
    6) I tried to show how I rigged the traveler line in the diagram. Essentially, the traveler stopper knot is ABOVE the hole and runs below and around the gunwale. Then I made a Figure-8 knot above to create a loop. The I tied 'Line A' through this loop with a Bowline knot. Hope that makes sense.

    I have found that this setup works quit well when sailing. Enjoy and please let me know if you build one!


    [​IMG]
    Note that the lines extending off the photo above attaches to the rear corners of the boat.

    [​IMG]
    Note the dimensions shown above.
     
  2. Vic Roy

    Vic Roy Member

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    When I got my 1988 Mod. 1 last summer it had no mooring cleats so I added two small open base stainless ones inside the transom, one on each side, thru bolted. On my first sail the need for a tiller tamer became obvious and I first tried one I read about here, some light line wrapped around the tiller and it worked okay, but was cumbersome. I then found a solid rubber mooring snubber I had laying around, about 18" long with a galvanized "s" hook on each end......hmmmmm....so I hooked one end on one cleat, went over the tiller, stretched the snubber and hooked the other end on the opposite cleat. Vola! a tiller tamer. The tension is easily adjusted by just sliding the rubber toward the bow on the tiller. The solid rubber has enough "bite" on the tiller to keep it from sliding like shock cord.

    Vic Roy
     
  3. c14_Jim

    c14_Jim Sailing on Shelter Bay

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    Ontological economy

    vic roy,
    I did the same thing with a standard bungee cord. I screwed a tiny cleat on the top of the tiller and the friction alone allows me to set the tiller in any position or even steer with the bungee in place if I want. It has worked out especially well for paddling with both hands and going forward to adjust or take down sails. It pops off with the flick of the finger when not wanted. Simple is good (Ockham's razor)
     
  4. Charley Sheets

    Charley Sheets Member

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    tiller tamer for $2.00

    I have a Tiller Tamer brand on my Cat. 25 and it is needed on a boat that heavy. I had a Watkins 23xl and put one on it that was simply a plastic clamp with a small line running through it. By pushing down on it the line was clamped tight and held my tiller very well. I will be installing one on my Omega soon. I am going to clamp or screw a heavy plastic clothes pin on the bottom of my tiller with a line running to both sides of the transom. One end will be tied through a strap and the other will be easily removable. The clamp will easily hold the tiller in place. You can also move the tiller by hand with ease if necessary. The type of clamp is sold by West Marine for holding up power cables,fenders, bimini lines etc. Charley
     

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