Tiller Extension Length?

Discussion in 'Capri/Catalina 14 Talk' started by DonS, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. DonS

    DonS Member

    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I just purchased a Ronstan urethane U-joint for my tiller extension. However, my current extension is ~24 inches and I sometimes clip it to the tiller when running. Now with the new urethan U-joint I don't have to worry about clipping it, since it will just suspend itself.

    I would like to get some opinions from those of you who single hand but have the same kind of rubber U-joint. What length of the extensions do you use? pros/cons? I figure if I need to lengthen the extension, now is the time.

    Personally, 24 inches seems a bit short. I sit just slightly behind the barney post and sometimes when I get a strong puff and I am hiking out over the rail I sometimes think a longer extension would be better...on the other hand a longer one just get in the way when tacking/gybing.

    Love to hear some opinions.
     
  2. sailorlem

    sailorlem Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    My Mod I has an adjustable length stick I really like. Have never had to adjust to full length.
     
  3. c14_Jim

    c14_Jim Sailing on Shelter Bay

    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I made a whole new (kick-up) rudder and tiller for my boat. I made the tiller extension 25.5 inches long and it seems to work fine. My boat is an Omega and I am guessing it is about the same distance to the barney post. It is 52 inches from my transom to the center of the mainsheet cleat on the barney post. I have a little loop of elastic cord I can easily put my extension into so it sits atop the tiller when not in use. Getting everything taken care of during the tacking sequence, sheets, tiller, switching sides, getting the boat on the new course and such takes a lot of practice for single handing. Do you leave the mainsheet cleated where it is or loosen it a bit before tacking? I found leaving it tightly cleated can be a problem if you have a gust during tacking or steer off the wind too much. I have the jib sheets marked so I can pull them in to the first approximation quickly, and do the fine adjustments after getting settled on course for the new tack.
     
  4. DonS

    DonS Member

    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Thanks for the replies. I tried going with 36inch tiller extention...way too long. It was getting caught up on everything, and I mean everything. I eventually just took it off for the remainder of my sailing today.
    I tend to uncleat the main but hang on to it, uncleat the working Jibsheet and execute my tack. Once I'm sure I'm fully in my new tack I cleat the main and let go of it - but quickly haul in the jibsheet. I finally let go of the new working jibsheet and then go back to holding on to the mainsheet. Having a too long of a tiller extension definately complicated the process - going back to 24" extension. I either need someone to crew for me - or a 3rd arm.
     
  5. EddieB

    EddieB New Member

    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I single hand my Capri and, yes for me, the 24 inch tiller extension was too short. I purchased a Harken universal swivel #7102, had some left over 1/2" PVC, cut to 36", put it all together and went for a sail. The swivel fits perfectly in the PVC. As to the length, I started with 36 inch knowing that I could cut it back if needed. But after a good sail in some breezy conditions I like the length fine. I might wack a few inches off later, but I think for single handed situation the length was good. I could sit forward of the barney post in full hike position! So for $11 investment, much improvement over original 24" tiller extension. IMG_0232.JPG
     

Share This Page